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a friend reloads for me, sts hulls, 1 1/8oz shot, 8 petal downrange wads, 18gr green dot...when i rest my gun on the rubber pad, i notice flakes of green powder...what does this say, and should i change the recipe? thanks in advance...milt luther
 

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Yes!

It is too light a charge and you are getting incomplete burning! It should be 20 gr of Green dot.
 

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Most likely your friend needs to use a hotter primer. Is he using a cheddite or wolf? Other possibles, not a deep enough crimp or wad not sealing efficiently in hull.
 

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There are a lot of variables to consider. Ask youself the following questions. Do all the shots feel the same? Are the target breaks good? Do I break a lot of targets? Will I be using this load in cold weather?

If there is a problem with the load you are using you could switch to a hotter primer, like a Winchester 209. Probably a good idea if your shooting in cold weather.

On the other hand if everything is working OK then leave it alone. HMB
 

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I never shoot cold shells. On league nights I bring my shells to the car and go to the club. I bring them in. If it is VERY cold, like less than 0 degrees, I usually have a handwarmer in the pocket with the shells. ( a Chemical one, not a combusting one.)

Never a problem. I have noticed there are some combinations over the years that have problems in cold weather.

Hotter primers, higher pressure loads, etc help. Claybuster Lightning 7/8 oz wads have given me cold weather problems.

A "AA" pattern wad will produce higher pressure than one with a flat bottom, and in the same recipe works better in the cold.

Keep 'em warm for less trouble.

HM
 
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