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I load them 3 times on the average.I look at them extremely close after the second loading.If the pin holes have started to appear I just chunk the hull.I really love the Fed papers.I think, in my old worn out mind, that they shoot softer and pattern a little better than plastic.Probably just my imagination! Anyway,3 times is the magic number for me.Your mileage may vary.
 

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I load a F209A, 18.5 grains of Green Dot, 12S3 wad and 1 1/8 of 7 1/2's for 1100 fps. I get 3-4 reloads. I look at the crimp and the merger of the tube and brass. I am OK with one small pin hole. My hulls never hit the ground.
 

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19.0 Red Dot, Windjammer, Cheddite Primer, 9/8 of shot.....3 is about max before you get some pinholes
 

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I load a F209A, 18.5 grains of Green Dot, 12S3 wad and 1 1/8 of 7 1/2's for 1100 fps. I get 3-4 reloads. I look at the crimp and the merger of the tube and brass. I am OK with one small pin hole. My hulls never hit the ground.
And if the hulls hit the ground they are not usable anymore?
 

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1Straightshot:

Not letting a hull hit the ground means to me that you shoot only your own hulls, not pick-ups of other shooters. Paper hulls pick up moisture if they lay on the ground overnight or for a longer period of time.

I reload .223, .308, 30-06 and others. when I reload metallic I resize the brass after every shot, measure and trim to a desired length plus several other operations. For shot shell, I inspect the hull for pin hole burn throughs, strong case mouth and overall condition. I can do this in about 10 seconds. I usually check about a target box of hulls, about 350 or so, and then load them. I check each reload for overall appearance, i.e., good crimp, no bulges, primer properly seated and so on. Again, about 10 seconds per shell. I don't hurry as I enjoy creating a proper shell.
 

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I load the older Federal papers twice, 3 time sat most. The new Federal papers one time only. They do not have the same wax content. My load is Federal 209A, 21 gr Green Dot, Federal 12c1 wad and 9/8 shot. And Federal 209A, 18.0gr Red Dot, DR H FO wad and 1.0 oz. shot. "Can't beat the smell" Bill
 

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1Straightshot:

Not letting a hull hit the ground means to me that you shoot only your own hulls, not pick-ups of other shooters. Paper hulls pick up moisture if they lay on the ground overnight or for a longer period of time.

I reload .223, .308, 30-06 and others. when I reload metallic I resize the brass after every shot, measure and trim to a desired length plus several other operations. For shot shell, I inspect the hull for pin hole burn throughs, strong case mouth and overall condition. I can do this in about 10 seconds. I usually check about a target box of hulls, about 350 or so, and then load them. I check each reload for overall appearance, i.e., good crimp, no bulges, primer properly seated and so on. Again, about 10 seconds per shell. I don't hurry as I enjoy creating a proper shell.
Ed,
Thanks for the definition. The last time I loaded paper shells there was no other choice. The most important operation was to check for overall internal shell depth. This was done to ensure the base wad did not come loose or shoot completely out of the shell altogether. Is this not a concern these days?
 

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I agree, I think you have Winchester Super Trap and Federals mixed up.

I'm playing with some old Winchester right now to use up some of the shorter wads. Yes, you have to be careful of the base wad.

Just for fun I have loaded them about 7 or 8 times. I iron them and re-wax them, most are still in pretty good shape.
Evidently they had to make do in WW11. I have even found some inserts that fit into the mouth with wax to
put new paper so they will crimp. The inserts were that old, not the shells.
Yes, I have to much spare time!:image035:
 

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I like 25 gr Unique, RIO primer, 12S3 wad, 1 1/8 oz 7 1/2's in papers. Gets to the target quickly, mild recoil.

I load this one time and let the hulls go. This load is hard on papers.
 

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Two good reloads and toss the third time. Or toss the second load if I reloaded a handicap load twice. I use Int'l Clays or Green Dot to get 1225 ft/sec out of my reloads for handicap. Clays to get 1150 ft/sec for singles reloads.
 

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In the case of this story I think this fellow got very few reloads: A friend of mine who thought that he had been gotten the best-of one too many times by a local gun jockey bought a few target boxes of GM papers from a trap range that had been stored in a shed for a long long time. The papers were mostly all a greenish color from mold, but he sprinkled a top layer of nice once fired hulls on the top and sold them to the gun dealer who coveted the paper hulls. He then waited for the later opportunity to hear of the buyers response. They both laughed of the prank and are still friendly.
 

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I reload twice and then them fly. I screwed up recently and reloaded a number of boxes a third time and I'm proud to say I still have a face. Evidently I didn't do a good job marking the bags of empties that created this. I now have to look down the barrel after every shot to make sure nothing is left in the barrel as I've had a number of shells come apart after firing. I even had the paper part of the shell to go through barrel towards the target the other day. I've only got a couple more boxes of these left and no more reloading the third time. I'm no stranger to reloading and I use an Automate that produces beautiful crimps. I inspect every shell before they go into the boxes but none of these shells showed potential problems. When reloading papers caution is priority. JMHO Bob
 
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