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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

Full disclosure, I have never reloaded brass (for pistols). I've reloaded shotgun shells forever, and just recently got into reloading for rifles. I have a an 80's S&W in 41 Rem Mag, and I can never find ammo for it. I just bought a set of reloading dies for the 41 Rem Mag, so I've decided to start reloading for it. I can get brass from several vendors, but the bullets seem to be another story. They're either more expensive than I was expecting or just simply unavailable. I don't know if this is true, but I've read before about using a 40 cal bullet in 41 brass.

My question is this: should I look at using 40 cal bullets in the 41 brass? (Is that a stupid question?)

Again, I am a new brass reloader, so just rip into me if I am wrong here. I need to learn what works and what doesn't.

Thanks
 

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I would not make the bullet swap you suggest. Follow what's in the book. Besides the cast bullets, look for plated bullets. Mid-South has them in stock as I write this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone, I will check out those resources- does anybody have load data that they would be willing to share with me? I have a Lee reloading book.. but it is from the 90's (as am I) and I know that the available powders has changed a little since then. A modern medium hot load would be great. Actually any info would be great.

Thanks in advance. You can PM me if you prefer that method
 

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I really liked my 41 mag Model 57. I loaded it with 2400 powder and 210 grain bullets. I used 17.0 grains. Make sure you have the right COL. Very accurate load. 2400 is a slower burning powder, so you don't usually get leading like you do with 296 or unique. Good luck with your decision.
 

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I hope you bought carbide (resizing) dies. It'll save you the mess of having to lube your brass prior to sizing. I would suggest you buy Loadbook in that caliber. It's about $10 and have load data from powder and bullet manufacturers for that specific caliber only. Presuming you don't have a semiauto and have to worry about having enough oomph on your starting loads to work a slide reliably, slowly work-up your loads to see which your firearm prefers in terms of accuracy. Segregate your brass according to manufacturer and how many times you have reloaded them. Milder loads will give you longer brass life. I think Oregon Trail/LaserCast bullets have merged with Rim Rock Bullets. Even though they may be the same weight, best to check the data for jacketed and lead bullets separately- they may not necessarily be interchangeable. A little caution about using top end loads when using lead bullets: you may end up with considerable leading (in the barrel) which can be a pain in the ass cleaning. Invest in a good scale, caliper, and powder trickler. Be careful and enjoy your new firearm and hobby! P.S. 40cal and .41cal bullets are NOT interchangeable. Crimp your bullets adequately to prevent bullet movement due to recoil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I hope you bought carbide (resizing) dies.
I bought a kit used that had these in it. I don't know if they are (or how to identify if they are) carbide. looks like 1 part RCBS and the other 2 are Lee
Automotive tire Tire Auto part Audio equipment Household hardware
Finger Gas Rim Household hardware Automotive tire
Household hardware Material property Gas Auto part Cylinder


Coil Household hardware Cameras & optics Gas Auto part


Presuming you don't have a semiauto and have to worry about having enough oomph on your starting loads to work a slide reliably
No semiauto here
Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory
 

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We have to see the mouth of the sizing die. Agreed, get a carbide sizer. Ebay may have one if yours is a non carbide type. Look for a ring insert in the mouth of the die. Dont forget, lead bullet ".41 "special" loads are fun too. Consult a manual for 700-900 fps loads.
 

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When loading a cast lead bullet belling the mouth of the case keeps you from shaving bullet when seating the bullet. If the crimp doesn't cover the bell the bell is to deep.

When loading lead bullets to magnum velocity a small copper or brass cup called a gas check prevents leading the bore.

When loading the COL needs to fit your chamber. Fitting your revolver chambers is your goal. If the reloads are going to used in more then one gun using the book or SAMI specs is probably the best. But setting the loader to what works for your revolver and not sharing with anyone, or shooting another firearm in the same caliber works.

Al
 
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