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I am Reloading for the first time and was curious as to what the experienced reloaders thought of the recipe I am coming up with. Using a 2 3/4 inch Remington gun club shell with 20.6gr of Winchester aa super handicap powder and a TGT12 wad. I am aware that this shell normally has 1 1/8 oz of shot but am not sure if that would matter. My thought is that the wad is designed for the size of the shell. What’s your thoughts?
 

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Whatever you do in terms of changing components matters. Stay with published recipes, period. There are many available on both the Hodgdon and Alliant sites. If you freelance, you're looking for big trouble and should not reload shotshells.[
Thank you. I used the Hodgkin site and found the correct
Measurements. Looks like mine were right. However I do appreciate your feedback for safety and for steering me towards the website. My only question is on the primer now. I have CCI209. Is there a difference in the primers? Rather is there a difference that would cause me to have a concern?
 

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Using the TGT wad instead of a 1 1/8 oz. wad is appropriate when using an extremely dense powder such as WSH. If you had used a 1 1/8 oz. wad with that powder you likely would have dished crimps. You are fine.

And, welcome to TS.com!
 

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Yes, primers matter. Many folks think that there is a linear order to the power of primers, but that is not exactly correct. It is how a specific primer works with a specific powder in a specific load. Some think the Federal 209A and CCI 209M are hot primers, but the pressure they produce in some loads is actually less than for a milder primer. There are times one can substitute primers however. If your specified load produces 8500 PSI or less, you may be able to safely substitute another primer. You can always ask the powder manufacturer if your propose swap is safe.
 

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Fro
Yes, primers matter. Many folks think that there is a linear order to the power of primers, but that is not exactly correct. It is how a specific primer works with a specific primer in a specific load. Some think the Federal 209A and CCI 209M are hot primers, but the pressure they produce in some loads is actually less than for a milder primer. There are times one can substitute primers however. If your specified load produces 8500 PSI or less, you may be able to safely substitute another primer. You can always ask the powder manufacturer if your propose swap is safe.
from what I’m reading the cci209 primers produce less pressure than Remington 209p primers.
 

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Yes, there is a difference in primers. Typically, if a hotter primer than is called for is used, you can exceed the upper limit of pressure, created by the load/primer, which can be unsafe. However, if you use a "colder" primer you will stay within the parameters, but the ballistics of the load will suffer. This article by Tom Armbrust does a good job of explaining it: Shotshell Primer Substitutions Effecting Patterns by: Tom Armbrust
 

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Yes, there is a difference in primers. Typically, if a hotter primer than is called for is used, you can exceed the upper limit of pressure, created by the load/primer, which can be unsafe. However, if you use a "colder" primer you will stay within the parameters, but the ballistics of the load will suffer. This article by Tom Armbrust does a good job of explaining it: Shotshell Primer Substitutions Effecting Patterns by: Tom Armbrust
But, not all primers behave as "hot" or "cold" with all powders. Sometimes a primer that behaves as a cold primer with one powder might behave as a hot primer with another. At the risk of overgeneralizing, some primers most consider "cool" with flake powders behave the opposite with ball powders. And, I believe WSH is a ball powder. Trying to predict how a different primer might behave with a given load is a fool's game.
 

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I am Reloading for the first time and was curious as to what the experienced reloaders thought of the recipe I am coming up with. Using a 2 3/4 inch Remington gun club shell with 20.6gr of Winchester aa super handicap powder and a TGT12 wad. I am aware that this shell normally has 1 1/8 oz of shot but am not sure if that would matter. My thought is that the wad is designed for the size of the shell. What’s your thoughts?
You do not come up with recipes, you find the recipe that fits the components you have. I also agree with having a powder scale, an electronic one make it a lot easier to weigh a lot of drops. But if your budget is some what limited a balance beam will do. You will notice that the powder drops will vary due to how you operate your press.
As a starter load I would pick one that is one level below the fastest load. I suggest you try the 1200 f/s load with a Win 209 primer. This way you will not have to be too concerned about the plus side of the drops.

Jason
 

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As Tim trots out this old message that is saved on his computer:

A word of caution.

If you are getting into reloading strictly to save money, don't. Buy factory ammo.

If you are going to get into it to make it a sub-hobby of your shooting or hunting hobby, then by all means.

If you don't enjoy it, it's not worth your time. Because you aren't likely to save enough money to make it worth the time you spend in front of the reloader.

I reload for clay target shooting, so bear in mind, what is written below is based on high volume target loads. Some of the answers may be different if you are reloading for hunting.

Step one, before you even buy a press, is to go online and buy Lyman's Fifth Edition Shotshell Reloading Manual. Read it cover to cover, then re-read it.

I wouldn't use the data in the Lyman manual though, since it is a bit dated. Use the powder manufacturer's online data.

Then, pick a reloader. There are single stage and progressives. If you plan on reloading a few boxes of shells from time to time, a single stage press will be fine. If you plan to reload a LOT of shells, plan on getting into a progressive. There are a lot of brand choices, and prices, and others may chime in here with opinions and advice.

Then, pick what kind of hulls you want to reload. Remington seems to be the best choice these days (they are what I use) but there's absolutely nothing wrong with Winchester AA's and Federal Grand's.

I would steer away from other hulls and stick to these. Other hulls work fine, but there is less data available for them. They all work. It's just a matter of preference. Bottom line, stick to one style of shell and don’t waste your time with others, once you decide.

Like I said, I use Remington, but even then, I don’t mix and match when reloading, even though the load data is identical. If I’m reloading Gun Clubs, I’m reloading Gun Clubs; if I’m reloading STS’s, I’m reloading STS’s, if I’m reloading Nitro’s, I’m reloading Nitro’s, and so on.

I prefer Winchester primers, because they are reliable and cost effective, but the other brands are just as good. They all work. It's just a matter of preference.

Absolutely, positively, invest in a good scale, and use it. The electronic ones are nice, but the balance beam scales are just as accurate.

WEIGH your powder charges, especially when setting up a new load or starting with a new container of powder, and never believe the bushing charts. They are notoriously inaccurate.

I like Downrange wads because Kevin Lewis is a good guy and a friend, but the brand name wads are fine (a bit expensive) and Clay buster wads are fine too, though some people complain they leave more plastic residue on your choke tubes. They all work. It's just a matter of preference. Just make sure you use a wad made for a tapered hull if you use Remington or Winchester hulls, and a wad made for a straight-wall hull if you use any other brand of hull. This is covered in the Lyman manual.

I like Hodgdon Powders (and their other brands, IMR and Winchester) because Chris Hodgdon is a friend of mine, and their home offices are near my home. Supporting my local economy. But Alliant, and other brand powders work just fine. They all work. It's just a matter of preference.

Stick to the powder manufacturer’s published online loading data.

Good luck!
 

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As Tim trots out this old message that is saved on his computer:

A word of caution.

If you are getting into reloading strictly to save money, don't. Buy factory ammo.

If you are going to get into it to make it a sub-hobby of your shooting or hunting hobby, then by all means.

If you don't enjoy it, it's not worth your time. Because you aren't likely to save enough money to make it worth the time you spend in front of the reloader.

I reload for clay target shooting, so bear in mind, what is written below is based on high volume target loads. Some of the answers may be different if you are reloading for hunting.

Step one, before you even buy a press, is to go online and buy Lyman's Fifth Edition Shotshell Reloading Manual. Read it cover to cover, then re-read it.

I wouldn't use the data in the Lyman manual though, since it is a bit dated. Use the powder manufacturer's online data.

Then, pick a reloader. There are single stage and progressives. If you plan on reloading a few boxes of shells from time to time, a single stage press will be fine. If you plan to reload a LOT of shells, plan on getting into a progressive. There are a lot of brand choices, and prices, and others may chime in here with opinions and advice.

Then, pick what kind of hulls you want to reload. Remington seems to be the best choice these days (they are what I use) but there's absolutely nothing wrong with Winchester AA's and Federal Grand's.

I would steer away from other hulls and stick to these. Other hulls work fine, but there is less data available for them. They all work. It's just a matter of preference. Bottom line, stick to one style of shell and don’t waste your time with others, once you decide.

Like I said, I use Remington, but even then, I don’t mix and match when reloading, even though the load data is identical. If I’m reloading Gun Clubs, I’m reloading Gun Clubs; if I’m reloading STS’s, I’m reloading STS’s, if I’m reloading Nitro’s, I’m reloading Nitro’s, and so on.

I prefer Winchester primers, because they are reliable and cost effective, but the other brands are just as good. They all work. It's just a matter of preference.

Absolutely, positively, invest in a good scale, and use it. The electronic ones are nice, but the balance beam scales are just as accurate.

WEIGH your powder charges, especially when setting up a new load or starting with a new container of powder, and never believe the bushing charts. They are notoriously inaccurate.

I like Downrange wads because Kevin Lewis is a good guy and a friend, but the brand name wads are fine (a bit expensive) and Clay buster wads are fine too, though some people complain they leave more plastic residue on your choke tubes. They all work. It's just a matter of preference. Just make sure you use a wad made for a tapered hull if you use Remington or Winchester hulls, and a wad made for a straight-wall hull if you use any other brand of hull. This is covered in the Lyman manual.

I like Hodgdon Powders (and their other brands, IMR and Winchester) because Chris Hodgdon is a friend of mine, and their home offices are near my home. Supporting my local economy. But Alliant, and other brand powders work just fine. They all work. It's just a matter of preference.

Stick to the powder manufacturer’s published online loading data.

Good luck!
Thank you. This isn’t about saving money was looking for a semi hobby as well. Just don’t want to be foolish. Hence why I’m here. Everyone is giving great advice. Thru this thread I’ve already learned a lot. I have Lyman 5th addition book. That’s how I was piecing info together. But when I went to the Hodgdon site that gave me everything. Just brought up my question of the primer. I believe I have my answers.
 

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I am Reloading for the first time and was curious as to what the experienced reloaders thought of the recipe I am coming up with. Using a 2 3/4 inch Remington gun club shell with 20.6gr of Winchester aa super handicap powder and a TGT12 wad. I am aware that this shell normally has 1 1/8 oz of shot but am not sure if that would matter. My thought is that the wad is designed for the size of the shell. What’s your thoughts?
Put a bead on shotgun reloading data | Hodgdon Reloading

I know you already found it but here's your load options for the components you listed. You can get even more specific as you've already found with components and weight. It's fun to look at and browse options.

I'm new to shotshell reloading too but have found a lot of information on this site. Not new to metallic and suggest a scale as well
 
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