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after 28 years of reloading for both shotgun and metallic i finally had a dangerous mishap. i was reloading 500 .38 specials. i was putting the loaded shells in a tupperware container. as i went to move the shells the container slipped and the shells fell to the floor. one shell apparently landed on the rim of a shell on the floor hitting the primer with enough force to detonate it. my ears rang and my shorts needed changing. as i was picking up the spilled shells i found the ruptured case and a seperate shard of brass. no idea where the bullet went. im glad it didnt hit me. i showed the wife and told her i need to go to the attic the next time it rains to see if the bullet exited the roof. i have a new found respect for handling loaded rounds.
 

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Your last sentence is the key. You were handling ammo, not reloading. Do not give the trolls like Steve any extra ammo. A factory load being move in a tupperware container because the box was crushed would have done the same.

Glad no one was hurt.
 

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The bullet would not have gone very far.

Once it exits the case, the pressure drops and so does velocity.

Glad to hear it just scared you a bit.

don Verna
 

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I believe Chuck Yeager, the aviator, remarked in one of his books that his friends thought it was great fun to throw live rounds into a fire in a pot belly stove when they squadron was in England. That group found such juvenile antics to be great fun. God bless 'em. At worst, the case would fly, not the bullet. Nothing to contain the pressure. But a flying case could, I suppose, hurt.

One guesses that storing rounds/powerder/primers in a safe is a much more dangerous practice...a pipe bomb of sorts if there were a house fire. Or undercharing a metallic round that allows detonation.

But...I dunno if it's an old wives tale about keeping loaded metallic rounds in a vehicle for long periods of time? I heard that the jostling sometimes changes the burn rate of the powder, hence the pressure curve. Anybody?
 

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On the Discovery Channel, the Mythbusters tested this scenario. They placed cartriges in an oven and cooked them off. Even a 50 BMG stayed within the confines of the oven. The case moves away faster because it has less mass. Handgun rounds didn't even break the inner glass of the door.

-Aaron
 

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Decades ago before Readers Digest turned into Commie Digest they ran an article about a guy who built a wood framed box and covered the open sides and top with Saran Wrap. He put a hot plate in it and cooked off rounds and nothing even got past the Saran Wrap.
 

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I understand what will happen if live rounds are place in a fire,stove etc.

What has always worried me a bit is ammo handling and having a round go off when dropped which is what I understand happened to Rick.It has not been uncommon for me to drop a completed shell on a concrete floor during reloading process, or on a Trap line while shooting for that matter.

I have never witnessed a shell detonation in this manner first hand. Who has, and what were the circumstances?

Jim
 

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I think.......in a case like that, the first thing I would do is to count the family "jewel's" and make sure they were all intact! lol lol

Hauxfan!
 

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I read an article in one of my gun magazines it may have been guns and ammo, not for sure, but it told about a guy that was shooting at an indoor range with a semi auto pistol and he had his new shells sitting in the styrofoam holder beside him on the bench or floor and a spent casing that ejected from the gun hit the primer on one of the loaded rounds and set it off. No one was hurt in this case either, but it sure makes you think about safety.
 
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