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Reloading .410 bore?

3018 Views 13 Replies 13 Participants Last post by  GrandpasArms
It seems that whenever I mention reloading .410 bore hulls I hear about how difficult it is. However, most of the comments are coming from shooters who don't already reload that size. That leads me to question the accuracy of their tales of woe.

Really, is loading a .410 all that more difficult than a 12 gauge, especially if one is using a single stage reloader?

Thanks in. Advance for any input.

Larry Frieders
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I do reload 410 and will attest that it is more difficult to load them than 12 ga. The reason being, in my opinion, is that the base is so much smaller that they tend to be less stable in a progressive press. Also, the capacity is so much less that just a little too much shot and it can spill. Larger calibers have the capacity to absorb a bit of overshot. In a 600 Jr. they are no more difficult to reload.
 

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I load on a Mec 8567 and see little difference in loading 410 versus a 28 once you have the machine set up. Since the volume of the 410 is so much smaller it can be a pain in the setup or if you have a shot spill as mentioned above. Dependent upon your age as to whether you will have any problem with the Mec Jr. As I've gotten older my hands don't handle small items well. LOL Jackie B.
 

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The .410 is a bit more difficult because of its small diameter. I find the most difficulty with folded over wad petals when the wad is inserted. Reforming the crimp correctly is another area of difficulty.

Ponsness/Warren has solved the problem of shell stability on a progressive loader.

Jim Skeel<BR>
P/W Dealer/Distributor

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I've loaded 12s and 410s on a single-stage machine. Once you are into the swing of things the 12s can move along pretty nicely, maybe 2 or 3 boxes an hour when it's all said and done. And it really seems like you are reloading shotshells. Doing 410s on a single stage is a lot like loading metallic cartridges on a Rockchucker - the process is slow and intensively manipulative.

I've talked to some guys who load 410s on MEC progressives and say they work well. Understand, I'm just passing on second-hand information when I say that, so take it for what it's worth. I don't know how that works because a skinny little hull like the 410 has to be awfully wobbly in a MEC turret.

Jim is spot on about the PW being able to offer the shell stability which is critical for powder/wad/shot insertion in a progressive machine.
 

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I have loaded literally thousands of rounds of 410 on both MEC 600/700 single stage & a MEC 650. The single stage is very slow,but easy to work with. I do not like the progressives above a MEC 650. Too much up & down movement & also jiggle with the hull,causing shot spill. The best case for fast reloading at a cheap price is a used 650. And yes,it is harder to load the 410 than the 12 on a single stage. It all has to do with the payload. If you use ONLY 1 hull type,so much easier but even the,the slightet variation in length causes problems.
 

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The Hornady 366 has a thicker plate that holds the shell preventing a lot of the characteristic wobble of the .410 hulls. Once I have the loader set up for a load that fits the hull things generally go very smoothly and fairly fast. I had a MEC Grabber that was very frustrating with all the shot spilled from the unstable hulls as the loader advanced.
 

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Larry, Yes it takes abit of getting used to. The most important items being that you really need to drop the correct amount of powder and shot and adj. both holes to be perfect. There is no play for volume in the 410 as the wad has no dead space area in it that you have in the other gauges. Next once that is done fine tuning the wad pressure and pre/and final crimp are also abit more important. Once these are done and you stay loading the same hulls and not changing back and forth its becomes no different than the other gauges. So it takes longer to set-up and then your good to go. Best of Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
 

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I first reloaded 12 ga and .410 with the MEC 600. I found absolutely no difference between the machines on handling either gauge. Several years ago I upgraded to a MEC 650 in both gauges. Again, both machines are equal.

If you want to load 410's do so and don't let the naysayers discourage you.
 

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i load .410 with a 9000, a little adjustment in the beginning for your particular flavor of shell is all it takes, you may squash a hull every now and again but thats about it. process is straight forward.
 

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I have loaded LOTS of 410 shells on a MEC 9000G fitted to an original Automate. If you understand how to adjust the machine they are no problem. They are a little tougher to get dialed in, but once you have it set, you are good to go.

Shoot well and often,

Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the encouragement. I've decide to get a used MEC single stage (600 or 650)because I'm very familiar with how to adjust them - made thousands of 12Ga.

Next step is to get my hands on a nice .410 gun - probably O/U or SxS. Vacillating between looking for something and ordering Briley .410 tubes for that fine Ugartechea 12Ga I have (still for sale on GunBroker). Tempted to keep the Ugartechea - only weighs 7 pounds WITH a 7 ounce recoil weight in the stock.

Larry
 
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