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Discussion Starter #1
I'm about to buy my first reloader and have been reading about the process and reading all the "Getting Started" threads.
I think before I even consider a reloader I need to first build myself a dedicated reloading workbench

Before I get started on that I thought I ask if anyone here has decent plans for a DIY workbench build?

And, if you had your dream reloading workbench, what kind of layout, drawers, vise, shelves, etc
would you add to a design?
 

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Yes. Here are the plans for the bench I made:

https://shotgunsportsmagazine.com/downloads/bench_plans.pdf

I did not make the upper part. But the bench portion is very heavy duty and solid. You can scale the dimensions, height, width and depth, to suit your needs. For me, a key consideration was height. For years I'd been reloading sitting down and it always seemed to put strain on my lower back. I built this bench tall enough so I could load standing up and it made all the difference in the world. That underneath shelf is where I store my powder and there is enough space under the shelf to store bins of empty hulls. I built a low shelf along the back top to put stuff like primers and bushings. I also bored a hole in the top so my finished shells drop into a bin on the shelf underneath.
 

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You can get all kinds of ideas on a reloading bench, but need to work with the space you have. The biggest issue is to make sure it is solid.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do a search, lots of info.
Uh, I always start most tasks these days with an online search.
If the search comes up thin, or incomplete, then I'll have to ask.

Got a specific link to workbench plans that have worked well for you?
 

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That reloading bench is on my list of "things to do this winter."
 

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Solid core wood door makes for a seriously solid benchtop. You can cut it to fit your space or your existing bench frame. Drawers are best mounted on full length rollers but they are spendy.
 
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Uh, I always start most tasks these days with an online search.
If the search comes up thin, or incomplete, then I'll have to ask.

Got a specific link to workbench plans that have worked well for you?
Imagine....4X4's, 2X6's, and 3/4" ply board. Screw them together and suddenly you have a reloading bench.
 

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Imagine....4X4's, 2X6's, and 3/4" ply board. Screw them together and suddenly you have a reloading bench.
The use of 4x4s and 2x6s, instead of 2x4s, will add appreciably to the "solidness" of the bench. You don't want the front to sag due to the weight of the loader or the bench to vibrate while reloading (contributes to inconsistent loads). Using the heavier lumber will reduce or eliminate these issues.
 

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The use of 4x4s and 2x6s, instead of 2x4s, will add appreciably to the "solidness" of the bench. You don't want the front to sag due to the weight of the loader or the bench to vibrate while reloading (contributes to inconsistent loads). Using the heavier lumber will reduce or eliminate these issues.
Well, I've been using mine built like that for 30+ years. Oh, and 35" deep so I can stack lots of other stuff behind my loader. It's as stable today as the day I made it.
 

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make it at least 8 ft long and 36 in. deep that way you can put a back on it like in the picture. I have 2 that size and still need more space. I also have 2 of the 5 ft. tables with just 1 loader on each table. I also used the 4 x 4's for legs you can usually go to Goodwill and get the laminated tops that a builder didn't use that's what I did on one of my tables that holds one of my 800+'s

Mac
 

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All of my benches are mounted on the wall. For the last shot shell bench I took a heavy 2x4 used deck screws to mount it on the studs that make up the wall, making sure it is perfectly level. I mounted the bench top to the 2x4 again using deck screws and put legs on front and back with a couple cross supports and runners front to back on the sides. The top surface can be either doors like flashmax suggested or you can use countertops or one inch compressed wood with a finished Mylar(?) surface. I doubled the thickness of the pressed wood and used deck screws to mount the top layers to the frame and the shotshell press on the top. The bottom of the bench is wide open which come in handy for storing hulls and wads in plastic tubs.

For my metallic press, I bought a couple of white cabinets with 3 drawers each made of pressed wood material and finished smooth surface that are in a kit. The drawers are used to store small parts, dies, and accessories for both presses. I took a piece of plywood and mounted it to the back of the cabinets with a space between them. Then after I shimmed the cabinets to make sure they were level, I used deck screws again to mount the cabinets against another wall, through the plywood backing. Again I doubled the table top and used material along the back and sides like a splashback to catch things from rolling or getting pushed off the top, like my scale. My benches are rock solid and will not move.
IMG_0403.JPG


This pic show the metallic reloading setup. I have a couple of different single stages along with this turrent press. I mounted the each of the presses on a piece of pressed wood. I can switch out depending on which one I want to use.

Heavy solid doors like flashmax are great table tops and are usually very level. I have two that I I use for building surfaces, but dang are they heavy. If I tried to set them up myself today, I am not sure I could. They are two inches thick and must weigh close to 100 pounds.

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Those suggesting that it be ultra-sturdy are right on! You have no idea how much torque full-length resizing rifle cases exerts on a bench. I have built several including some for other people, and my current design is simple yet user friendly.





The frame perimeter is made from 2x6s ripped down to a full 5" width (from 5-1/2") as that is the width of the molding I wanted to use. The crossmembers are 2x4s spaced 12" apart, the legs are staircase newel posts and the top is 2x10s with a sheet of 1/2" plywood with a nicely figured birch upper layer. The only nails in it are in the shelving; everything else is screwed or bolted together. There are electrical outlets scattered around the underside for my power case trimmer and the other electrically-operated tools you see on the bench. Partially hidden by the Rock Chucker Supreme rifle loader is an electrical box housing two more outlets and a rheostat switch for the track lighting attached to the ceiling over the bench. The top measures 7' in length and 44" in depth with 12" of that being occupied by the shelving, which is dimensional lumber with panelling for a back and sliding glass doors. The whole thing is sealed with water-based semi-gloss polyurethane and the top and lower shelf were treated with a cherry stain first.

When I loaded shotshells, a MEC 9000E sat on the left end of the bench. I obviously have added a few more types of metallic cartridge powders since then.



Handloading on a wobbly or weak bench is not fun. I have had larger benches, including an L-shaped one, but this design has served me for about 12 years and in that much time, I honestly haven't thought of anything I wish I had done differently.

Ed
 

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Wife got a laptop computer, threw out her table, I rescued it added a set of wheels so I can move and clean it. Works great "for me" plenty strong 1&1\8 inch top good solid mounting for loader--storage is good with drawers and cubby holes, I did add some shelving below. Best part FREE, all formica easy to clean Ross Puls
 

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Ross, you took all the fun out of making one! But congrats on the ingenuity.

Ed
 

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While I was still reloading I setup a room next to the laundry room for reloading. Used kitchen cabinets placed on a set of risers so I could stand and a lower "table" for the reloading.
 

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Will have to agree with the deep table top design, i went for the sturdiness of using two 2X12 and a 2X8 for the table top for the entire length of the room approximatly 14 feet and will eventually build another one on the wall to the right for gun cleaning and the tumbler. Hope the picture attaches as it gives plenty of room for shot shell reloading on the left and metalic reloading on the right side of the table
 

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