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I believe with (2) 35 gallon trash cans of once fired STS hulls, that it's time to start reloading.

I am considering the purchase of a Mec 9000G with auto-mate.

Any input/advise as to the ease of operation, setup and quality of reloads for the Mec 9000g or input as to another system thats is better would be appreciate.


Thanks
Tony S
 

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Although many swear by the Mec 9000 I swore at mine.

I gave up on it and replaced it with a PW 800+ with a case feeder. I love this setup. Easily 500 per hour and up to 700 per hour if nothing hiccups - which is rare.

The Dillon hull feeder holds about 80-100 hulls so I found it a pain to keep filling it. The PW hold 500.

I also have a Spolar hydraulic and it is slick but the PW with case feeder is faster.

Don Verna
 

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I would test drive the Mec, PW and Spolar's that are within your budget. I have had the 9000 and PW 800B and 800+.

The only one I still have is the PW 800+.

Once you use them you will know what you want.
 

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Well, this is like a new car, everyone has a strong opinion. I have in the past 3-4 years had the Mec 9000G, put the original AutoMate on it, bought a P/W800+, put the original AutoMate on it, added the shell feeder to the P/W, added Whiz's after market accessories (which are terrific), removed the AutoMate and added Spolar hydraulic unit.

It really boils down to personal preference. The Mec/electric unit (Automate with Mec's own features for safety) is a terrific unit for the money. And you don't need a world class bench for it, which is critical for a bigger press. I even had a shop laser cut Whiz's steel plate to make things even sturdier, complete with drop hole for pvc tube. But I never had a single issue with a reload from my Mec.

I truly enjoy reloading with the P/W. You can load up 4-5 hundred empty hulls, 2-3 hundred primers. 25#'s shot, and about a pound of powder. Add some serious ice tea, a slick dispenser for your favorite wad, and it is happy hour for me.

If Spolar had a shell feeder (don't, and from my conversations probably never will), there is no doubt I would have one of those too. They are built like a Rolls Royce, no doubt about it. But with the rig I have put together above, it is a very brain dead operation, which fits my style just fine.
 

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Just a poorbiys observation but after spending the money for several reloaders including the PWs and the spolars, hull feeders and etc., seems like you could shoot new shells for quite a while. Any of you fellas above ever started out with a 600jr., of have you always had pleanty of "play" money?Stroker
 

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I started with a $125 grabber. Sold it for a Steelmaster. Wanted more speed so I bought and sold several 9000's and and an 800+ until the profits bought me a new 800+.

Ultimately I ended up with an 800+ with extended primer tray and Whiz'z metal top plate for about $250 initial investment in trading material.

Had I bought it new it would have taken about 185 boxes of reloads to pay for it. That is about 4625 rounds reloaded. I loaded over 7000 last year and am at 1400 this year so I guess I would have nearly covered the cost of of 2 800+'s just in the past 13 months.

If you want something bad enough there is always a (legal) way to get it.
 

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Started with a Mec 600, then Grabber,tnem a 9000GN, and finally added an Automate. Never been happier, the Automate is very easy on the shoulder and the shells come out perfect. You can buy new for $8-900, what could be better perhaps a Spolar with hydraulic for $2500(?)?
Bill
 

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Stroker,
I started with a MEC JR.

Yes, it is play money. If you do not have a lot of play money, Trap is not the game you should play at seriously.

If you shoot two lines a week, the MEC JR I started with is what you need/can afford.

I now reload over 15,000 shells a year and I work full time - so time is an issue for me. I love to reload and like to do it efficiently and with excellent equipment. My shells look as good as factory and I am proud of my work.

I save about $2 a box on average so each year I "earn" $1200 of after tax income; and as an added bonus, I get exactly the loads I want. It does not take long to pay off good equipment if you use it. Plus, I can recoup most of my investment if I ever sell the loaders - as prices seem to keep going up.

New shells are great for many. If you do not shoot a lot, if you are worried about making safe ammo, if you do not like to reload, or if you have a LOT of play money; then buy shells.

Making ammo is not for everyone and you could be one of those people. Nothing wrong with that. I know a two guys who only shoot factory. They are good shooters and great guys. They put up with those of us that reload and pinch pennies while we spend hundreds on reloading toys. They must think we are nuts - but heck, we can still play together.

Don Verna
 

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I started with a Mec 250, moved up to the VersaMec 700, then a PW 800, and then a Mec 9000, then tried a Spolar. I have two 9000s sitting on the floor and a Dillon SL900 on the bench. Unless someone comes up with something new that's the way it's going to stay. I would like to see a larger primer feeder on the Dillon, but when it runs out it only takes a minute to refill, throw some more hulls in the hopper and start cranking again. NO bushings to change and I can always dial the exact charge I want and not have to settle for what is close.
 

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Big Dave. If you started with a 250...you have been at it a long time. Glad to know you have reached the "top of the line" and are happy. I started with a 400 and thought I had the best. Since then I have used 600s, grabbers and the 9000 mecs. I have loaded for 47 years and never had a "bad" shell til I went to the progressives. I shoot trap, skeet and sporting and shoot almost all reloads. I still haVE ABOUT 400 pounds of reclaimed shot and find it ok til the registered shoots come along. When plastic wads and shells came along I wondered "what next". Guess plastic is the final thing, or is it? At 73 I dont shoot as many shells a year as I did but savings on shells has allowed me to shoot many more targets. I was just asking about the "high dollar" reloaders mentioned in this thread. Seems I can do well with the Mec line and have for all these years. A few tenths of a graijn of powder has never worried me at all. If you weigh the powder in factory shells you will find them to be "off" some as well. Thanks for the comments. See you at the range....Stroker
 

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I too started with a 600 JR. It's a great way to learn, but my recollection is that it takes six strokes of the handle to complete one shell, and a lot of moving the hull from station to station by hand. I think it was a good job to complete 100 rounds per hour. I now have a Dillon SL 900 which completes one round per one stroke of the handle. The right hand stays on the handle, the left inserts the wad into the wad guide. It is no problem at all to complete two flats (500 rounds) per hour. In fact my only problem is keeping the darn thing fed. Right now I'm just about out of wads. Before that it was shot, and before that I had no more empty hulls. If you are serious about reloading, sooner or later you'll need a serious reloader.
 
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