Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all...brand new member here, 15 years or so of trap shooting under my belt. I have finally broke down and bought a really pristine BT-99 two barrel set with 32 mod/34 full barrels. The only problem I have is that it has a release trigger which I would like to convert back to a "Pull" trigger.

Anyone here have a recommendation for a good gunsmith who can do this in SE Wisconsin?

Thanks for the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Learn to use the release and watch your scores go up.
I have considered it, but I am a little concerned it will screw me up as I shoot a lot of Sporting Clays with an O/U also. I did shoot it and after a round or 2 of getting used to the high POU I was shooting my average of 22.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,521 Posts
If you don't have a flinching problem with a pull trigger, it should not effect you shooting sporting clays. Shooting a release for trap is an advantage. Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
You may be able to remove the stock and remove the release link. Take the stock off and take a look. You might be able to figure it out. You could also post a picture and many comments will probably follow with great ideas.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,302 Posts
Don't listen to Jack. Just look at all these happy release users and winners!
:143::143::143:
:1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1::1:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I agree. IMO, only go to this option when you begin flinching.
I tend to agree...I do not have a flinching problem. I have also witnessed a couple turf shots or peppering the back of the trap house shots by release shooters over the years which left a bad impression.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,993 Posts
I tend to agree...I do not have a flinching problem. I have also witnessed a couple turf shots or peppering the back of the trap house shots by release shooters over the years which left a bad impression.
These type of incidents are common when someone first tries to use a release trigger. I've seen it many times myself. I also speak from experience. Shot the back of a trap house back when I was a teenager when one of the older trap shooters insisted I shoot his gun for a round and give it a try. All went well for the first station, but on the first bird of the second station...well....you can guess the rest of this story.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,302 Posts
Here ya go poppy. I have posted this before and it goes back a few years now. You want to improve your scores, get a release.


I got the following note some time ago from a friend that he received from one of his friends. I did a couple of minor edits to protect their identities but the rest is presented as written. It's got nothing to do with flinching but it sure makes a strong case about release triggers.

"Hey XXXXXXX,

As you know, I took up Trapshooting a little more than 4 years ago using an old model 12 trap gun that was loaned to me by a friend. However, after I had demonstrated a commitment to the game, my father in law sent me an over/under. By chance, it had both release and pull dropout triggers. While I knew nothing about release triggers and had never flinched, I thought why not give it a try. One of the guys at the club where I shoot showed me how to use it. Bingo. Within a couple of rounds I was shooting better than I had ever shot before. I soon gave ATA a try. I liked it and within XX months I was shooting AA/27.

I have watched the arguments about release triggers on TS.com for quite a while. I never felt qualified to jump in and participate because most of these arguments referred to flinching rather than just whether a release trigger is a better method of firing a trap gun. Because I had never had a problem with flinching, I do not understand anything about that problem. However, here is where it gets interesting. I have a very unique job. I am a team coordinator/referee/slave driver/mother hen for a team of exceptionally educated, experienced professionals representing a variety of engineering, medical, psychological and research disciplines. Our business is rocket science and brain surgery so to speak.

We are all employed by a major aerospace firm and while some of what we do is highly classified, most of it is of a standard commercial nature. What we do is provide independent testing for human interface control systems to determine if those controls are designed in such a manner as to eliminate as much probability of human error as possible. Simply put, this might just be whether it is better for a two way toggle switch to have up as off and down as on or vice versa. However, think of the control array in a 737 cockpit, the space shuttle or a nuclear power plant and that is what people pay us a lot of money to test. We usually have about 10 people on a team and we bill at $8000-$10,000 per hour.

About once a quarter we try to get the team out of the labs and into a more natural setting. I decided that a day at my trap club might be a lot of fun. I recruited a friend to help me with getting the guys to the line and shooting, and hopefully, hitting some targets. We had four trap guns, three with pull triggers and mine with the release. I was surprised at how easily some of the guys took to shooting the release. Afterwards, as we were sitting around enjoying chili dogs, the guys who used the release trigger started asking questions as to why my gun had a release and the other guns had pulled triggers. I gave the standard overview concerning flinching. However, these guys immediately were interested in whether a release trigger is a better human control interface for firing a trap gun. Much discussion ensued and everyone had a great time bringing their particular discipline to bear, but being research scientists no one would accept a resolution without specific testing.

A couple of weeks later, we had cleared the decks for a large contract concerning a fire control system for a shipboard missile defense system. The package was to arrive on the appointed morning and we had completed constructing our testing protocols. However, as I was conducting what I thought was the final check list meeting, we were notified that their might be a delay in delivery. Somehow the conversation flowed back to the outing at the trap club and then the discussion about release triggers. About that time, we were notified that delivery would be delayed at least 24 hours. So here is all this high-priced talent with nothing to do so someone suggested why not apply our talents to a release trigger review. Needless to say, numerous bets were quickly made. Having previously received security clearance to bring my trap gun into the employee parking lot, I happened to have my gun in my trunk. A quick call to security and I and my trap gun were being escorted into the lab.

Soon, we had several volunteers with wires attached from their trigger fingers, up their arms, on their spinal column and all over their heads. Others were studying the mechanical forces required and exerted by the two different triggers. Data was collected in the number crunching began. After a bit over five hours of research we had our answer.

Our typical project results in a document that runs from 20 pages for something very simple to several hundred pages for multiple function control arrays. However, while these reports are very helpful for the design and manufacturing teams, we have devised a simple ratio to present so that non-technical management people can quickly appreciate the value propositions of one system versus another. To do this we assign the least desirable functionality a value of one. We then assign the better functionality a value of plus one. By example, if we have found that the up is the worst position for "on" for the toggle switch then we might say that having "off" is a 1.14 better choice. We call this the better alternative ratio.

Because most of the products/systems that we test our very well designed with a lot of previous knowledge applied, our alternative ratio is usually fairly low. In fact, previously the highest alternative ratio that we have estimated for a manual control was a 2.67. Now, drumroll, the release trigger came back with a better alternative ratio compared to the pull trigger of 3.27 based upon a projected 100 repetitions in a 45 minute time frame. Quite frankly I was shocked at how big the difference was. Even though I had seen my shooting improve after getting the gun with the release trigger, there were lots of other variables that I am sure contributed to that progress

In summary, we produced a result that someone would have had to pay us about $45,000 to achieve. While I can't add anything to the discussion about flinching, I think I can categorically state that a release trigger provides a substantial biomechanical superiority to a pull trigger for shooting a trap gun.

Of course, we all know that many of the best trapshooters successfully use pull triggers and achieve 99% plus results. We also know that the majority of release trigger users will never achieve 99% plus results. However, if I were going to train 100 qualified candidates that can fly fighter jets to shoot trap, every one of them would have a gun with a release trigger."
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,042 Posts
Wow, looks like release triggers may be coming to fighter jets also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,993 Posts
Here ya go poppy. I have posted this before and it goes back a few years now. You want to improve your scores, get a release.
SS,

Thanks for the response. It was an interesting read.

Believe me when I say I'm not trying to be disagreeable about the subject of release triggers. Just a couple of things that I would like to point out...your perspective, and the article also, was for trap shooters.

IMO, and once again you and others may not agree with me on this, release triggers are best suited for the game of trap. Some of us shoot many other clay target sports. Yes, I realize that some shoot release triggers no matter what type of clay game they are shooting. I ran into a few who had to go to them shooting competitive skeet and sporting, but I have never met a skeet or sporting clays shooter who CHOSE a release trigger over a pull trigger because he thought it would give him an advantage. They did so because they had issues being able to shoot a pull trigger. It was make the change or quit.

Secondly, if a shooter, who has no issues with pull triggers (like myself for example) chooses to go to a release trigger, what does he do if he starts flinching or has trouble releasing those? I personally have witnessed this type of problem before. In fact, there is a thread running on this site right now about a release trigger shooter who has developed a case of the "yips" (for lack of a better term). It's more common than shooters would like to admit.

To all those who choose to go to release triggers, I wish you nothing but many years of continued shooting success. But, I will be personally honest with you in closing by saying that I hope to God that I never have to use one, because if I do, that means I have developed that dreaded word "flinching". I have seen it frustrate many a successful shooter. For what ever reason, it seems to be the simplest cure.

Good Luck and Good Shooting!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I shoot Trap with release triggers. Everything else, Sporting Clays, International Bunker and Flyers with pull triggers.
Never have a problem transitioning between the two.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
19,102 Posts
Stick with pull if yu are not flinching. Release triggers have a lot of inherent differences and switching form one gun to another with releases can be a nightmare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,962 Posts
Take the stock off and get a photo of each side of the innards, e-mail them to Phillip and he can tell you who made them. If they are marked no need for pics.

Pat
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top