Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
While at a shoot I decided to have a well known trigger Smith check out both of my guns, I asked him to make my triggers release at the same poundage. While talking with him, he stated that he likes to start at 2 pounds and that anything over 3 was way too fast and dangerous.
I thought it was the other way around, that two pounds was a faster trigger, than say a three.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,661 Posts
Heavy means you don't have to relax/release much at all for the hammer to fall while light means you have to relax/release much more. The release weight is reversed from the pull weight on a pull trigger.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
2,066 Posts
Since the original title is about a release trigger, we need to be careful about which weight we discuss.

Most release triggers are about a 5 lb set weight and about 28 to 32 ounce release weight. A higher release weight is a faster trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Nope. Two is slower than three.
I was referring to the weight in between set and release being say a 5 pound set 2 pound release would be slower than a 5 pound set 3 pound release. Sorry if I was mistaken but I had guerini slow mine down by increasing the poundage difference between set/release.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,631 Posts
In his book, Daro Handy recommends a little bit of forward movement before the release trigger lets off in order to get a feel for when the gun will fire. I have this on my Release trigger for the TMX but not on my Doubles gun where I have trouble with the 2nd barrel going off too soon. Arthritis and numbness in my old fingers doesn't help a bit either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
There seems to be some confusion here, correct me if I'm wrong. 5 lb. set / 80 oz. set, 2 lb. release/ 32 oz. release. So if this is the case and it takes 80 ounces of pull to set the trigger and 32. oz. or let up on the trigger which is 2 lb. to release if I am correct.

Same scenario, 80 oz of pull and 3 lb / 48 oz of let up on trigger means more of the pull weight needs to be let off thus slower trigger. This is the way I understand a release trigger to work.

I started shooting on a BT99 and had to have a release installed in it very soon. I had been shooting a friends BT99 with the same built release. Phillip asked me how I wanted my trigger built and I told him I didn't know, make it like the one I was shooting.

I then purchased a MX8 Combo, Phillip built my triggers and asked how I wanted them. I told him like the BT99 because that was what I was used too. Phillip explained he couldn't make them that slow. I told him to make them the way he thought they should be made and I would adjust too them. I did and all was good.

Step forward a couple of years of shooting with the Perazzi MX8. I took the BT99 out to shoot at the local club for a practice just to give it a try. I set the trigger and called the target and the trigger never released. I opened the gun and checked the shell and it all looked good. So closed the gun and did it all over again and no firing of the gun. I opened the gun again and removed my handload and put my snap cap in. I tried to release the trigger and nothing so I removed my finger from the trigger and it went off. The trigger was really slow and I knew that because Phillip had told me my friend shot a really slow trigger. I had just found out how slow, I loaded the gun up and shot my round by releasing my finger clear off the trigger and the gun functioned beautifully. I shot it well and couldn't believe the difference in triggers. I have not shot the BT99 since.

PD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,661 Posts
The difference between set weight and release weight is called speed. If the difference ( in perazzidave's examples ) of 5#/2# and 5#/3# are looked at there is a 3# differential in the first instance but only a 2# differential in the second. The first trigger is said to be 'slower' than the second.

Addendum. These weights are in pounds applied to the trigger. In 'dave's example of complete finger removal the release weight can be said to be 0#.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Don Rackley

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,556 Posts
PD
The Trigger sets when you apply 80 ounces of pressure.
The trigger releases when pressure is reduced to 32 ounces.

If release pressure was 48 ounces the trigger would go off sooner.

West
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
PD
The Trigger sets when you apply 80 ounces of pressure.
The trigger releases when pressure is reduced to 32 ounces.

If release pressure was 48 ounces the trigger would go off sooner.

West
Thanks for the explanation, my thought process on this is wrong.

PD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,691 Posts
Just as important as the set/release weight is the amount of travel (or creep) in the trigger. I prefer as little trigger movement as possible while still being safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,631 Posts
On a Pull trigger the term Creep applies when you pull the trigger. On a Release trigger if there is creep when you set the trigger so what, it doesn't matter at all. On my other post in this thread I mentioned Daro Handy's book where Daro prefers a little forward movement on the Let/Off . I like this also but I cannot seem to get it on a trigger where the release hook contacts a pin in the hammer only on a trigger where there is a notch in the hammer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,195 Posts
OK---I'm more confused now than I was when I opened this thread!!! So to keep it simple, and I do believe in the KISS system of shooing, I am going to just stick with pull triggers. So there. break em all Jeff
 

·
Thorn in your side
Joined
·
8,112 Posts
OK---I'm more confused now than I was when I opened this thread!!! So to keep it simple, and I do believe in the KISS system of shooing, I am going to just stick with pull triggers. So there. break em all Jeff

I agree with the more confused part, but I shoot a release. I have shot a few different ones, and the one I have is fantastic for me. I had Phillip do my K-80 the same as the one I have in my Mono gun....all is good now!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
When you are thinking of release trigger weights you have to think completely backwards from a pull. You have a set and release weight. The set weight is not a important as the release weight. The set weight is the amount of weight you have to pull to set the trigger, you want enough weight difference so you will have a complete set on the trigger. Some people think the set weight is rely critical but my way of thinking it is not, some people think they have to have a 5lb set and 2lb release and they say thats a 3lb release, its not a 3 lb release its a 2 lb release.The reason I do not think the set weight is that important is one time you might just set the trigger at the 5 lb and the next time you might grip harder and really be using 6 or 7 lbs of strength to set the trigger. The important part is the release weight, a 2 lb release you have to hold at least two ponds of pressure on the trigger to keep it from going off. When you finger pressure gets below 2 lb the gun will fire. A 3 lb trigger you have to hold atleaset 3 lbs to keep the trigger from firing so when your finger presser gets below 3 lb the gun will fire. now you also have travel on the release andI like a title movement to my release and be smooth so as you start to release the trigger you can feel a little movement so know exactly when the trigger will release some people call that a live trigger. A dead trigger has no travel at all, to me its hard for me to shoot a dead trigger it will surprise me . Hope that helped some of the thinking but my writing ability is not that good so it probably screwed more people up

Phillip Crenwelge
 

·
Ljutic Nut
Joined
·
2,880 Posts
You said it pretty good Phillip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
When you are thinking of release trigger weights you have to think completely backwards from a pull. You have a set and release weight. The set weight is not a important as the release weight. The set weight is the amount of weight you have to pull to set the trigger, you want enough weight difference so you will have a complete set on the trigger. Some people think the set weight is rely critical but my way of thinking it is not, some people think they have to have a 5lb set and 2lb release and they say thats a 3lb release, its not a 3 lb release its a 2 lb release.The reason I do not think the set weight is that important is one time you might just set the trigger at the 5 lb and the next time you might grip harder and really be using 6 or 7 lbs of strength to set the trigger. The important part is the release weight, a 2 lb release you have to hold at least two ponds of pressure on the trigger to keep it from going off. When you finger pressure gets below 2 lb the gun will fire. A 3 lb trigger you have to hold atleaset 3 lbs to keep the trigger from firing so when your finger presser gets below 3 lb the gun will fire. now you also have travel on the release andI like a title movement to my release and be smooth so as you start to release the trigger you can feel a little movement so know exactly when the trigger will release some people call that a live trigger. A dead trigger has no travel at all, to me its hard for me to shoot a dead trigger it will surprise me . Hope that helped some of the thinking but my writing ability is not that good so it probably screwed more people up

Phillip Crenwelge
What brand scale do you use when working on release triggers?

Thanks,
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top