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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a serious question, not a fishing expedition. Why are release triggers more common in trap shooting than in skeet or sporting clays?
 

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Why not? there are folks here who shoot many disciplines.

"When too old to shoot Skeet, one will shoot Trap". I have heard this before.

I also enjoy shooting Skeet with a release.
 

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Subject: accidental discharge
From: ysr_racer
Email:
Date: 18-Jan-09


I stopped reading after "Switched to a release trigger". I won't shoot on the same squad as guys shooting RT's.

All your life, you've been "pulling the trigger", try walking upstairs backwards, and let me know how that works for you.

And the reason you are asking is?

FRedmon
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
>> And the reason you are asking is?

Because I want to know why are release triggers more common in trap shooting than in skeet or sporting clays?

My G-d, I'm starting to think all the crap I read about trap shooters is true. You know what, never mind. Don't answer my question.
 

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And what "crap" have you heard about trap shooters? #1- You asked about a controversial issue here #2- You asked a question, and you got answers from people who were trying to answer to the best of their knowledge. and #3- Why did you turn in to pouting saying "Don't answer my question"? If you don't want an answer, don't ask. People are just trying to help and you get pissy. Sorry for the rant...Josh
 

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One answer is the number of targets shot. Few skeet or sporting shooters will shoot 10,000 registered birds in a six month season, but many trap shooters do. I will leave for the Silver Dollar in about a week. I will shoot 2700 registered targets in 10 days. I use a release trigger.

Pat Ireland
 

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I am a newcomer to trap so I don't understand the emotion behind the question. However, what are the advantages/disadvantages of the release trigger? Why does it combat flinching? Is it easy to convert typical trap guns? What are the perceived dangers?


Joe Squarzini
 

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In skeet tounements there is a rule that if you have a misfire you must keep pressure on the trigger until checked by the referee. Hard to do with a release trigger. HMB
 

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The first time I shot a release on Skeet, I did very well. It was earlier this year, and I have shot Skeet since 1958.

Trigger control is mental. I cannot help but think that a flincher allows his cognitive brain to take over and micromanage the trigger press.

In this game, using the reactive brain to take care of details while the cognitive brain uses all its will to focus on the target is cardinal.

"Watch the bird, and every thing else will take care of itself".

When I developed the "F" problem, I would flinch with the 410! Recoil was NOT an issue. I was thinking my way into a bad shot.

If I put all my energy into looking at the target, I seldom realize when the trigger is pressed.

YMMV
 

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"Primarily the release trigger tricks the shooter who has become recoil sensitive,and allows the shooter to fire the shotgun without flinching."

This is not true. The flinch that is eliminated by a release trigger is not recoil related or you would still flinch with a release. No tricks involved.
 

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Wow - some of you are really rude. What's the big deal with answering his question? Oh yeah - it's because you don't know. That's okay - maybe there is someone who has actual knowledge out there willing to share and we can all have something else to ponder. Or you can just post te first irgnorant thing that pops to mind.

I'll throw in my two cents - I was told (I still shoot a pull, but am going to try a release this year to see if what I'm about to say is true) that it is much more difficult to blink your eyes when you use a release trigger. A "pull" motion tenses the body and promtoes a blink - a release not so much, so using one promotes seeing the target through the entire act of breaking it - and that is a good thing. The few skeet guys I know who shoot skeet well say that because you know exactly where you are going to break each target ahead of time, this is not as critical. I would think if it's good for one it's good for the other, but that is what they tell me.

Joe
 

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Personally i shoot a pull trigger.I shot a release for a while in trap,and liked it.I just prefer a pull trigger.In shooting skeet or sporting clays, in my opinion it would be more of a hassle to pull,release,pull,release,instead of pull,pull.
 

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Brooks- Most flinches do have recoil as an underlaying cause. The actual flinch is a learned reflex. Your body has learned that with a shotgun mounted, contracting the muscles to pull the trigger results in an unpleasant sensation. With a release these same muscles contract without the recoil (setting the trigger) and then they relax. It is more difficult to learn a reflex from a passive action (relaxation) than an active movement (pulling). But, some have learned to flinch with a release trigger. That makes a big problem. You can learn more about this by looking up the fine motor movements regulated by the pyramidal nervous system.

Pat Ireland
 

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Just for the record, I too shoot double releases in trap, skeet, and sporting clays, but what little hunting I still use a pull, and do occasionally flinch under those circumstances. This has been since 1977 (2nd year of registered shooting) and over the years have made two concerted efforts to change back to absoulutely no avail.

To HMB, I shot registered skeet for 4 or 5 years around 1990 with double release and all the rules required was that you notify the referee and the squad members that you were using one. I don't know if that is still the rule.

Personally, I believe an experienced release shooter is a lot safer than the above-mentioned shooter that flinches, takes two steps forward, and is momentarily out of control. I have seen guns go off on the second or third try to pull the trigger and I can guarantee you that wasn't safe at all.

This is not to add fuel to the fire, but I believe that, ignoring the flinch factor, a release allows better trigger control in shooting (for some) than pull triggers. I know several release shooters that use them by choice simply for that reason. Now that ought to raise some eyebrows....it's raining hard here today and there isn't much else to do but stir the pot a little.

Good times to all....

Larry
 

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"The actual flinch is a learned reflex."

If it were a learned reflex, you would do it EVERY time.

Hand anyone a "loaded" shotgun(loaded with a snap cap) and tell them to squeeze off a shot at a patterning board. You will see the "learned reflex" recoil flinch.

What is commonly referred to as flinch that is evidenced by shooter physically not being able to pull the trigger is something else. I am not sure what the physiology is, but a learned reflex would not manifest itself only 2-4 times per 100 shots.

I personally have no sensitivity to recoil. In fact, I enjoy the thump and I shoot 1 1/8, 3 dram loads and will go out and shoot 200 practice rounds in an hour. Yet, I started to flinch within my first 10,000 rounds. Installed the release, no more flinchs.
 

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I flinch with a Remington 572 pump using .22 shotshells on my wild cabbage butterfly hunts. Can anyone tell me what part recoil plays in this personal failure? Plenty of Skeet shooters believe the .410 gauge gun is the flinchiest one to shoot!!
 

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Ok.. I'll do my best.. First.. I can't shoot a release worth a dip.. I have a release flinch and nose dive the barrel.. ONLY.. my coaches Seitz could I shoot well with a release. Remember.. most trap shooting is move of a sweep and follow thru. For some.. a release is very easy to do motion.. as it takes less effort to release a trigger than to pull it. I know many shooters that could never go back to a pull trigger.. It's all in what you get use to.. If there were no release trigger.. you'd learn to shoot the pull.. Kind of like my PFS stocks and or 24 gram shells.. Either you love them.. or hate them. As you get more and more gun movement..a release can get iffy..as more movement.. it's easier to release the trigger at an unwanted time.. But that's just me..and my guess.. Everyone is different.. When I developed a HUGE F problem..EVERYONE said try a release again.. For me.. it only made things worse..but I know countless people whom it helped greatly.. There is no real answer for this question.. Try one.. and see if it fits your shooting style.. Really.. in the shooting game... no one cares how you get your score..Which gun,ammo, barrel,stock, rib..???trigger.. release or pull.. Just..what's your average.. If you shoot well.. YOUR setup works for you.. Shoot well and often..and don't worry about what others tell you.. Shoot your style with your gun.. It's that simple.. put the lead on the target.. All Good.. Mike
 
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