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I'm a little confused (not an unusual state for me to be in)? I'm just getting started shooting (ahem:) skeet and I purchased an older 26" Citori as a starter gun. It came with a mercury recoil reducer in the stock. I'm replacing the stock recoil pad so I removed the reducer but now I'm seeing several short barreled skeet guns for sale on here that also have them.
I put a reducer in my 32" XT because as I moved from an 1100 I seemed to need help in getting it to swing smoothly. However,it seems counter-intuitive to me to put more weight into the rear of a gun that should be plenty fast swinging already.

It seems a little unlikely that recoil is that big a problem with the light loads and open chokes used in skeet and the gun seems to balance fine without the extra weight.

How about it, you experienced old time skeeters; am I missing something here?

John
 

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QUOTE: "It seems a little unlikely that recoil is that big a problem with the light loads and open chokes used in skeet and the gun seems to balance fine without the extra weight..."

You hit the nail on the head, you don't need anything hotter than a 2 3/4 Dram load for Skeet in my experience. The targets are much closer and slower moving than a Trap target, so there's really no need for a "Handicap" load. A mercury reducer might be a good idea for a field gun firing 3 inch magnum loads, but it's completely uneccessary for Skeet in my opinion, all it's gonna do is make your gun heavier, which ultimately will result in arm fatigue.
 

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You want to make the recoil as little as is possible, regardless of the gun or the loads, since the effects of recoil are cumulative. You want a gun that is as heavy as you can physically handle to achieve this.

My skeet gun is 11lb, with a PFS on it, and I don't shoot anything heavier than 7/8oz 12ga (1250fps) or 7/8oz 20ga (1200fps) for skeet. I will shoot 2 3/4 dram 1 1/8oz for trap, the recoil doesn't seem to bother me as much for some reason, then again, I never shoot more than 3 rounds of trap in a day, and I might shoot up to 15 rounds of skeet in a day.

My gun is also set up to be more back-heavy than most peoples would be.
 

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I also shoot a 26" Citori, I haven't put it on a scale but I'd be surprised if it weighs more than about 8 1/2 lbs. I haven't found either 2 3/4 or even 3 Dram 1 1/8 oz. loads to be a problem recoil wise, but I usually don't shoot more than 3 or 4 rounds at a time. For my purposes, if recoil became a problem I think I would opt for a soft recoil pad like a Limbsaver versus adding weight to the gun. The only way you're really going to know what works best for you is to experiment with different setups, if you can shoot the gun comfortably without the reducer, you probably don't need the extra weight, but you can always put it in later if you need to.
 

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The lighter loads are just plain FUN, I had to move up a little on my skeet loads to get my Browning A5 to cycle reliably,

Try your Skeet loads on trap 16 yard line.

7/8 oz loads even 3/4 oz loads have had some people accussing me of shooting "gamer (extra heavy) loads!

"the way they smoke a target!"

Those 24 gram international loads make 16 and 22 yard targets disapear!

If the wieght is in the buttstock (IE. right at your shoulder)you it should not effect your swing. So with most skeet shooters resting their shotgun on a pad while waiting , how is carrying an extra 8 or 9 oz's even if it was a pound going to tire someone out?

Al
 

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John, What Skeet_man says about a heavier gun will recoil less is true, but a gun that is too heavy can/and will fatigue most shooters quickly as well. I believe most gun companies came up with a weight of between 8 and 8 l/2 pounds the norm. for the majority of target gun shooters. Some shooters will like a gun that is a little less/ or maybe more. I suggest you try to get your skeet gun between these numbers if you want to shoot a large number of shells/targets in a single day. Now if you add ll oz. in the stock, I would recommend 4-6 oz.s in a barrel weight clamped to the barrel of a O/U to rebalance the gun (A end cap weight for pumps/auto's). A extra pound in total weight will help alot in the recoil department. Only you can say if the extra weight in the stock will bother your swing or not!!! To me it makes no difference as I swing a shotgun with my legs and hips and my lower body can't notice the difference between a 6 pound gun or a 11 pound gun. Now if you use your upper body to swing a gun??? Well, thats another topic entirely. Good Luck and break em all. Jeff
 

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I went through much of the same. I bought a 26" Citori Skeet and put an old RAD I had on it. Then I did the really smart thing and bought a 26" barrel for my 390. My 390 has one of the soft touch stocks on it. Wow...what a pleasure to shoot. My skeet scores have gone up and I feel good about the gun. I like the Citori skeet, but I may have to find something else to shoot with it.

JON
 

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Can't beat 1100's and probably 390's ect for recoil. While for some people recoil is not a problem, it never adds anything positive to the game. I am going back to gas operated guns because of a an old shoulder injury that is bothering me.
 
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