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I’m thinking about rebluing an MX 8 receiver. I’m not a professional by any stretch of the imagination however I have done some rebluing in the past and it turned out pretty well. By Question is this. Will the resale value be less because I did the work instead of having a professional do the work?Assuming I do a good job.

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Rex
 

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I’m thinking about rebluing an MX 8 receiver. I’m not a professional by any stretch of the imagination however I have done some rebluing in the past and it turned out pretty well. By Question is this. Will the resale value be less because I did the work instead of having a professional do the work?Assuming I do a good job.

Thanks
Rex
When I hear or read "do the bluing myself, " I see cold bluing being used.
Why use a twenty dollar product on a $3,000 dollar part?
The factory bluing using a hot bath to help the steel itself make the finish.
A cold blue makes a reaction that of itself that either will look like painted on or etches the finish into the surface. It is very difficult almost impossible to get an even black finish.

Even if you would end up paying $300 for a rebluing job you end up with the finish that the factory used.

But I always dis cold blue products.

On the other hand take you polishing skills to their limit on a hardware store steel part and then cold blue that. Then decide if you want to do your action.

Al
 

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Reblue it yourself while you shoot it, it protects the steel. When you are off season is a good time to get it done by a professional. As far as gun value, trap guns are made to be used, not collected. Reblued guns may lose value to a collector, but collectors are collecting Colt SAA, and Winchesters made in the the 19th century.
 
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Reblue it yourself while you shoot it, it protects the steel. When you are off season is a good time to get it done by a professional. As far as gun value, trap guns are made to be used, not collected. Reblued guns may lose value to a collector, but collectors are collecting Colt SAA, and Winchesters made in the the 19th century.
If I had never followed cold bluing and seen the damage that the cold bluing chemical recation can cause, I might agree with you. But having seen cold blue, maybe the worst of it, use a lot of protective oil. A glove to keep the oil of your hand. Re-oil after use, wipe of oil to shoot and reoil when done.

Al
 

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If I had never followed cold bluing and seen the damage that the cold bluing chemical recation can cause, I might agree with you. But having seen cold blue, maybe the worst of it, use a lot of protective oil. A glove to keep the oil of your hand. Re-oil after use, wipe of oil to shoot and reoil when done.

Al
Well, I guess I am pretty lucky, following instructions and never having a problem touching up. Leaving metal bare might cause more problems than not covering it, that is what I was taught. I have seen guns that look like coral reefs, raw metal eaten up by acid from handling .

I guess it can be another matter of opinion.
 
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