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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
any recommendations on stripping and re-finishing? how do you get around the checkering? what finish do you use ( I want a high gloss) . any help would be appreciated
 

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Lots of variables. What finish do you have now ? I prefer a oil finish using Tru Oil . You can have a low luster finish or gloss depending on application and number of coats. You can mask off the checkering after you strip but will need to seal with a coat or two of whatever finish you choose. Biggest rule is do not get in a hurry. If you want a nice job you are talking weeks not days to complete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I plan on talking all winter to do 2 stocks, time is not a problem. I really want a high gloss durable finish.
 

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Tru oil can give you a high gloss finish and the plus is if you scratch it you can touch it up easily with more Tru oil. There are other good finishes also but I do not know anything about them. Hopefully someone else will respond that knows other alternatives.
 

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You didn't provide make and stock finish on stocks to be refinished? Some factory stocks more difficult to strip original finish. Now as far as checkering I have used regular strip remover used a brush to coat/soak the checkering and used a tooth brush to remove the finish, has always worked for me. I've used several finishes over the years, Tru-oil is a good choice as it will water proof the wood over other choices and easy to reapply for any scratches. You should use a stain on the wood prior to applying finish for desired color but don't use Minwax, has a sealer in the stain as you want top coat to soak in the wood.

As far as stain, I've used Danish oil and Herters French Red from Brownells with success, the Herters is water based and has grain sealer mixed into the stain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
one gun is a Ruger mini 14 with a maple stock, for practice, and the other is a Kreighoff KX 5 . The KX has a very hard finish, which chips easy, and also shows scratches
 

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I like to use a heat gun on the thicker harder nonoil finishes.
Sanding can remove extra material, a high quality scraper is great in most areas.
 

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For high gloss and durability, you can't beat automotive clear coat. You can get catalyzed clear coat in a spray can.
 

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I plan on talking all winter to do 2 stocks, time is not a problem. I really want a high gloss durable finish.
If you have that kind of time I’d recommend Custom Pro Oil. There are two types 1 in a pint can 2 in a spray. It’s available on line from the mfg. & also from Brownells. I did my 1st stock last year, it took 4 months building it up & wet sanding with linseed oil the kind with a dryer as a lubricant. I was told the Spray is faster & popular with some stock makers but after comparing some recently completed stock done professionally with spray on a 1 to ten scale I’d give the spray an 8. To be fair I’ve had a lifetime of experience in restorative refinishing mostly in autos & classics with wood trim even some guitars. I’ve never experienced such a lengthy endeavor on one piece of wood. I masked the checking throughout the process & at the end ran a checkering tool around the border to clean it up & used the linseed oil to blend it in. Pro oil was applied with a pads made in the same fashion as for French Polish. Here's a pic after a between coat sanding & another after the next application (gloss). You can finish your project either mat or gloss depending on preference. Notice the rod. I used a rod with tape wrap shoved into the stock bolt hole. The tape made a tight fit while the other end was in my vise. This setup enabled me to controlably rotate the stock so I could evenly cover all sides. Not a impossible 1st time project but not for the faint of heart. IMO Id pass on true oil, definitely an inferior product & I believe Polyurethane would be a better choice than true oil should you want to take the easy route.

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If you have that kind of time I’d recommend Custom Pro Oil. There are two types 1 in a pint can 2 in a spray. It’s available on line from the mfg. & also from Brownells. I did my 1st stock last year, it took 4 months building it up & wet sanding with linseed oil the kind with a dryer as a lubricant. I was told the Spray is faster & popular with some stock makers but after comparing some recently completed stock done professionally with spray on a 1 to ten scale I’d give the spray an 8. To be fair I’ve had a lifetime of experience in restorative refinishing mostly in autos & classics with wood trim even some guitars. I’ve never experienced such a lengthy endeavor on one piece of wood. I masked the checking throughout the process & at the end ran a checkering tool around the border to clean it up & used the linseed oil to blend it in. Pro oil was applied with a pads made in the same fashion as for French Polish. Here's a pic after a between coat sanding & another after the next application (gloss). You can finish your project either mat or gloss depending on preference. Notice the rod. I used a rod with tape wrap shoved into the stock bolt hole. The tape made a tight fit while the other end was in my vise. This setup enabled me to controlably rotate the stock so I could evenly cover all sides. Not a impossible 1st time project but not for the faint of heart. IMO Id pass on true oil, definitely an inferior product & I believe Polyurethane would be a better choice than true oil should you want to take the easy route.

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Lots of video's on refinishing stocks on You Tube.
 
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