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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been shooting release triggers for about a decade, but still find that I often release the trigger by relaxing my entire hand rather than just relaxing my trigger finger. I know that this isn't good for my placement of the shot.

Has anyone else had the same problem but overcome it? If so, do you have any tips on how to maintain a firm grip with the trigger hand, but relax only the trigger finger?

Thanks,

Easystreet
 

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Get a small rubber ball and practice squeezing it and holding it with your thumb and all but your trigger finger. Practice flexing, moving and rotating your index finger. This will train your hand and index finger to operate independently.
 

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A really good trigger will fire when you do no more than relax your trigger finger. If you have to open your finger you've got too slow a release and too much travel in the sear. A good trigger doesn't necessarily mean an expensive trigger. I had the same problem you describe with a 391 trigger that I had, but not with my 1100 trigger.
 

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Stay in the target dust.
That sounds good. If your thinking about a release trigger you're not concentrating on the target. Drive the gun with your right hand and just shoot the target - the trigger will take care of itself.

Does for me anyway
 

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Having the ability to control your trigger finger independently from the rest of your hand is a key skill in all of the shooting sports. If you do any pistol shooting you will quickly find out how badly that habit will affect your accuracy. Perhaps that might be a good way to develop the coordination? Just thinking out loud.
 

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I've been shooting release triggers for about a decade, but still find that I often release the trigger by relaxing my entire hand rather than just relaxing my trigger finger. I know that this isn't good for my placement of the shot.

Has anyone else had the same problem but overcome it? If so, do you have any tips on how to maintain a firm grip with the trigger hand, but relax only the trigger finger?

Thanks,

Easystreet
I've had the same problem for years, if you find a cure pls let me know.
jack mc
 

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1100 GRIP-1.jpg
I don't have that problem, but I do use something that would help. I have the entire neck and pistol grip built up with tennis foam grip tape. While not a thing of beauty, the grip is so solid that even relaxing my hand a little won't lose control of the gun.
 

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I wear a mesh backed batting glove with the trigger finger cut back 2/3 of the length. Helps me hang on to the gun yet feel the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you relax your whole hand rather than just your trigger finger, I don't think it would make any difference what size grip you use or how much feel you have of the trigger, you'll still lose some degree of control of the gun. It may not be much and it may not cause you to miss the target every time, but you'll be less accurate, IMO.

I think I'll take the suggestion about squeezing a small rubber ball and moving my trigger finger without changing my grip on the ball. That seems to make sense as a good exercise. BTW, I shot yesterday and tried to keep in mind to relax only my trigger finger and not my whole hand. I think it helped a little.

Easystreet
 

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Try just pointing your trigger finger at the bird when you want to release the trigger. You will find that when you point at something you will concentrate on the object (Claybird). This makes this a concentrated effort to release the trigger. This helps me a lot.
 

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Might help to keep your trigger finger along the side of the receiver until you have pulled the gun firmly into your shoulder with your right hand..then set the trigger..helps keep the actions independent of each other.....
 

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image.jpg
My BT99 with release had this bolt on trigger guard grip cushion when I bought it. Not sure what company made it, but works good for me as I grip the stock with my index (middle) finger.
 

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I have been shooting a release trigger gun since 1981, I do not deliberately release the trigger, it's a hand eye coordination thing, you simply allow your eyes to tell your muscles what to do, if you are trying to release the trigger yourself you will be looking at the bead and trying to figure out when you should let the trigger go, your gun will get sloppy and you will shoot behind the target.

Bottom lone trust your eyes to tell your muscles what to do

Argus Tuft
 

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The flinch you thought you cured, is still there. Like one of the great oratorian's here has said, you are trying to throw the gun away from your shoulder and at the target.

How much time each week or each day, even, do you spend on improving your trigger hand? You cannot expect it to cure itself if you only work your trigger finger while registering targets.
 

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Don't be shy 221, explain in detail, in exact detail, what your suggestions and procedural recommendations are......
 

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Trigger freeze can be caused by a number of conditions, 1. a poorly fitting pistol grip that puts the finger in the wrong place and causes poor feel of the trigger 2. too much wood disabling all but the last joint at the tip of the finger, described as pulling wood, 3. too much finger sticking outside the other side of the gun causing the shooter to pull the trigger with the second joint etc, all of these conditions can be fixed with stock adjustments, adjustable blades and so on, but there is one trigger freeze that is learnt, and this is from using a gun that does not fit which whacks the shooter in the face and hot loads that whack the shooter. over a period of time the brain learns that if the trigger is pulled it is going to HURT, so the brain intervenes and interupets, stopping the shooter from pulling the trigger.

By this time the shooter has backed off his loads and had a new stock made that fits, or bought a new gun that does not whack, all to no avail as the brain knows if the trigger is pulled it is going to hurt.

What the brain has not learnt is that it will hurt if the trigger is released and providing you have a gun that fits and does not whack you before you go to release trigger and you shoot soft loads the problems does not reoccur

It is always interesting to see people chime in on these posts, who quite frankly have no idea how this affliction manifests itself, who then scornfully cast aspertions upon the shooter who genuinely is looking for some advice and help with his or her problem, there are many shooter out there today who would not be shooting if it were not for release triggers.

The release trigger is not something new, it was around in Europe in the flint lock days and in 1938 a Dr Pol an American invented a device he called The Relaxing Trigger and patented it, the only difference from that trigger system and what we have today is that he was way ahead of the game in so much as his release trigger system could be switched on and off, google it ,it is quite interesting.


Argus Tuft
 
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