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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

I have had PW reloaders for decades and never ran into this problem-

I have a like new Platinum 2000- couple years old- lately it has decided to not index about 1 in 50 times- I thought it might be too much lube on the center shaft so i took it all apart and cleaned it real good- Seemed to help but still fails to index once in a while.

Anyone have any ideas? Tried to call Whiz but he's out of the shop for a while. Thought someone might have an answer. Seems the collet is not dropping down to engage the table correctly.

Terry Jones
 

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TJ........If your problem is solved please share the fix with us other P/W owners.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I tried to load some cheap Noble sports- Went into the dies REAL HARD and got stuck- Guess I forced the issue and bent a small pin (part # 88) and maybe put a flat spot on the Spacer roller bearing (part# 91)
Ordered new parts today

Hopefully this will be the cure.

Terry
 

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The same thing happened to my reloader. I ordered a new roller and bolt and it went about another year until it happened again.


The roller quit rolling and developed a flat spot. A new replacement roller was sized too small and did not work at all. I wrote a letter to P-W but never heard anything back.


I found an oilite bronze bushing that worked ok for about 700 reloads, but it too developed the flat spot.


Any excess clearance in the roller bolt location, that close to the axis of rotation, translates to where the index pin (farther out) will not index the carousel.

I sold the P-W for parts and bought a Spolar.
 

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Had this happen to mine as well.

The center column of the loader - the one with the slot in it that this pin and roller ride in - takes an incredible amount of pressure as the loader cycles. Thus it is the 'weak link' in the loader. The angled shoulders wear and the slop lets the pin/roller bind and deform.

Whiz White replaced the shaft for me (the install is rather precise and Whiz is set up to do it).

With this the pin and roller needed to be replaced (obviously). Further, the givory wheel (plastic plate that sits around the shaft), which has index holes in it was worn/damaged through this and needed to be replaced (lifetime guarantee on this part).

If you carefully watch each of these pieces as the unit cycles you can see where the pressure and stresses come in and you will quickly understand the damage you are seeing.

You say a 'like new' machine, but you do not say how many rounds you have loaded. Mine was well over 250,000 rounds before this failed. That being said, the slot in the center shaft needs to be kept lubricated and clean of debris.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I got my parts from P-W and re-assembled my reloader- Quickly ran thru 200+ and it is working flawlessly now!!

T. Jones
 

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Not familiar with the 2000 but have a 950 elite which I think is similar. Center shaft, but before they started making them out of plastic. Had a lot of issues with it. Called PW and they told me the links on the shaft were designed to break. Sent it to Whiz for repair and got it back still not working. He said it needed more parts which I got from him. Pretty hefty bill for all of this. While this was all going on I acquired a Hornady 366. That damn 950 is still in the box. In my opinion, at least the newer PW's, are way over rated. The Hornady design is very simple and parts, if you need any, are a whole lot cheaper. I will guarantee you if you call them, they will not tell you that a major part is "designed to break". I can also reload faster on the Hornady due to the fact that you put the hull and the wad on at the same time. Don't have to keep tapping the primers. Just a better machine in my opinion.
 

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Mike I have to agree with you. "As for Jim White intentionally sending a press back to the owner not in working order, well......" Always goes the exter mile.
Larry
 

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I didn't say he intentionally sent it back not working sent it back not working. That would imply dishonesty on his part. I don't think that at all. We resolved the issue and I don't have a problem with him. As to what you want to call a part, you have your opinion and I have mine. I'll stick to my old 366. They could have accomplished the same thing with a shear pin or slip clutch or make it out of material that is not so easily broken. From what I hear the older 800 series were pretty good. I can't say the same about the center shaft ones.
 

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Well, here goes... the man of a few words that I am, not:

Since Mr Scott has dragged me into this, I researched my invoicing program and all I can come up with is an order for a primer ram back in 2008. So we're going back 5-6 years and, honestly, I can't remember, nor can I locate ANY invoice for him.

I am thinking that I had a customer named Alan from around the Ohio area who broke out a portion of his crosshead and needed a new crosshead, but I am not 100% sure about who this was or where-been a long time ago. As far as purchasing "expensive" parts from me, I don't see that anywhere. This Alan did not want to purchase a new crosshead, so he machined it out himself and made a steel insert, much like all new P/W come with nos. He sent me photos and I said I'd be interested in a couple of those inserts myself. He sent me two, I believe if my memory serves me correctly. I think he was miffed because he considered them quite valuable, more so that I. I believe he also installed this in one of my broken crossheads for me.

Perhaps, Mr Scott can unlighted me with an invoice number because I show nothing else. If he can send me an invoice number I would be happy to post it here for all to see and my related charges. In fact, I cannot remember the last time I ever had a 950 in here with the short 1" shell holders. So I am very curious about this matter.

I have never, ever charged any customer for the entire amount of time I spend on their reloader, similarly with then work I do on Perazzi's. It is more of a labor of love (tough love at times with some customers), but I have a healthy retirement from a past profession and money has never been why I do this.

I have a Perazzi here that I have probably 10-12 hours invested in a fitting. I would be a hypocritical fool to charge this gentleman for that time and he'll probably pay only half. Many times I even show discounted labor on an invoice, but just as often I simply just cut my labor in half and call it "good."

I've never intentionally sent ANY reloader back not working, and I am amazed that even after I rebuild a reloader, and often time return it with actual reloads that take new factory shells to task, I'll get an occasional call that something is not working. Guy fiddle with adjustments and have no clue what they are doing, then they get to a point of frustration and that's when I get that call that "I" did something wrong. Oh, I may have overlooked tightening one of the 1/8" Allenhead screws from time-to-time, but those are no-brainer's.

In fact, I have a reloader right here sitting behind me awaiting UPS Monday morning going back to northern California that was rebuilt last summer but was returned for a problem. The problem is that it would not index after inserting a primer. The owner claims he doesn't "touch anything," but the wad ram was set 3/4" too low (that should have been a bigger problem), but his primer seating assembly was set so exceptionally high that the friction from the seating post on the base of the hull was so great that the turret could not rotate. Yes, the primer seating area was changed and not by me. Now, one with some minimal intelligence would have to assume that I could not have reloaded ANY shells on that machine in that condition, but I did, a dozen or so all sequentially numbered to show the owner the progression of a a "fair" reload to a "perfect reload"... Evidently there are gremlins in his reloading room or working at UPS. Oh, I did not charge this customer a dime for my work, and if I make a mistake, there would never, ever be a charge. I do make mistakes, and occasionally fix whatever UPS destroys.

I am sorry Mr Scott has lived with this problem for 5 or more years now without even calling me for assistance. Half my days are spent on the phone helping guys solve problems. I have to say that these times are soon ending. I just cannot spend that kind of time doing this kind of free work when I have shop work to do. I sure don't know any attorneys who would offer their services over the phone for nothing. And, because of this I end up working until midnight or later on most nights. This is why I usually don't open until after 10:00 AM... Yesterday morning I even had a call at 7:50AM (came early to get some work done) for help.

The other half has, many times, tried to convince me to stop all these late working hours and limit my phone calls for help to 10-15 minutes. In fact, I am going to institute a 10-15 minute limit policy for assistance, and then start my normal hourly charge for time beyond that once I have a credit card number. My neighbor is a certified QuickBooks Pro. He gives you about 10 minutes free and then after that it's $100/hour billed in 15 minute increments. He's trying to get me to do this as well. My days are just too long and wasted on the phone when I have bench work to do. The customer always has the option of calling the factory for "free" help as well. Ha, try that one on for size.

Here is the only invoice I should for an Alan Scott...


whizwhite_2008_020363.jpg



My invoicing database program goes back to 1997, so I am puzzled as to what other work I have done for Mr Scott. I am sorry this person has lived with a problem for these 5-6 years. Had I been the customer, I would have requested ME to take it back and fix it right! Maybe there are some sour grapes involved, but I am grabbing straws here because I just don't understand what's going on.

Mr Scott and I do 100% agree about the center shaft reloaders; the 900, 950, and Platinums. Their indexing is generated by a very small collar residing in the center shaft. That collar is "supposed" to "roll" up and down the machined channel. It probably does for a period of time, but the torque it generates to rotate the turret is just more than it can handle. I do make a hardened steel version, but it has its limitations as well. P/W should have used a much larger center shaft that would have permitted the use of a needle bearing roller collar. And, the use of 12L14 steel is just too soft for many of their applications. It is used because it machines quite nicely and tooling stay sharper longer.

Again, sorry Mr Scott has lived with this problem and if he'd like to return it to me, I would be happy to look it over and fix anything that I may have touched in its previous residence here. He pays shipping in and I'll pay it back.

Jim "Whiz" White
 

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One short addendum (I think I can be succinct):

You guys who are reloading the Remington Gun Club's, Rio's, Kemen's, and any steel based hull are going to run into problems on your reloaders.

The progressives were not designed for steel based hulls.

When steel based hulls are fired, their steel expands to the chanmber diameter, but does not retract any amount as brass would. Kerry Allor the "Barrel Meister" and I have talked many times about this... and we even talked awhile earlier today. He says it helps his business becasue he can eventually end up sleeving chambers that have become swollen.

The reloader I mention above sitting behind me right now was returned to me with a bag of hulls to reload... many were steel based.. P/W dies are 0.802"-0.806" in diameter. If you have the 802's, you're looking for trouble because of the torque required to resize the shell, and the 806's required additional force as well. And, if you are using a 900/950/Platinum, you are putting torque on that collar mentioned in my above thread.

FYI.
 

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I think the peoblem is you should have an I.Q. over 36 to use any P.W. . I have 3 and love them all/ Fred. Ps, I've dealt with Whiz a lot,wont find better or fairer Person.
 

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Sorry Gentlemen,

I have absolutely "No Dog In The Fight"... But, I do Personally take offense to making ANY attack on Mr. Jim, "Whiz" White's character or business acumend's.. I have known him only through this site, and several phone conversations, but... he has, in my honest opinion, been nothing short of being one of the most reliable, trustworthy men I have yet to have the pleasure of personally meeting. Being said, before the "easy" internet bashing, I would recommend to anyone on this site to give him a call, as he has been as personable and pleasant Man you will find. You may find this to be accurate.

Respectfully,

Mark Schneider

p.s. - I made your primer ram, so if you have a problem, get in touch with ME... I'll make it right, in your thoughts.

South East Tool Co., Inc.
901 Springfield Street
Dayton, Ohio 45403
(937) 258-0616 - ph.
(937) 258-8409 - fax
e-mail to: [email protected]
 

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i have to chime in also. whiz will bend over backwords to help you get it fixed. he is an asset we all need on gun parts [ perazzi ] and reloading parts and some of his innovations. regards howard
 

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Dittos to the above comments supporting Whiz White.Reminds me of my years as an MD-often those who get the most time and attention are the most critical and unappreciative.
 
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