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Talk about precision shooting! Heard on the news this morning that there was a head-on collision today in the skies over Siberia, WAY OVER SIBERIA!

It was reported that two satellites collided at high speed (yea, I would think that orbital speeds for satellites would be a bit faster than the typical, or even International clay pigeon!) resulting in the complete destruction of both with a large debris cloud now traveling through space. The collision happened 500 miles over Siberia.

It was reported that these were both "communications" satellites, one US and one Russian. Pardon my not quite believing this! A US satellite over Siberia brings to mind Keyholes or even newer spy satellites. This is reinforced by the 500 mile orbit altitude. Now, gee, what do you think the odds are of two satellites, cruising through space both arrive at the same exact 10 or 20 cubic feet of space at the exact same time? I figure it would be something like putting a load of 8's into a clay while shooting blindfolded in a snowstorm at midnight in a coal mine in West Virginia and hitting the clay that was launched from a trap in Sparta!

By the way, how much lead would you have to give an orbiting satellite if you are on the 27 yard line, Post 3????
 

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The Russian satellite was non functioning and out of control, basically not being where it was supposed to be. Same as cars on a highway, as long as you stay in your lane all is good. Interesting point is that the U.S. communications sat "Iridium" weighed less than 2 pounds and the Russian sat was about 2000 pounds.


Eric
 

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Mixer,

Small ??? discrepancy!!!! The two pounds quoted does not even come close to the Iridium Satellite tech specs. If you check the RUSSIAN web page listed you can get more details.

Iridium Satellites

Iridium Satellites 66 operational plus 6 in-orbit backup satellites are located in 6 orbital planes with the inclination of 86.4 degrees. Orbital period 100 minutes, 28 seconds.
General Characteristics:
Satellite weight - 700 kg (1500 lb),
Spot beams - 48 per satellite,
link margin - 16 decibels (average),
lifetime - 5-8 years.
 

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Sorry, the article I read had a typo. It said 1.235 pounds not 1,235 pounds.


Eric
 
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