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I shoot a lot of practice rounds each week. I like to shoot and of course i would like to improve my game. I know however that a lot of the time I am just burning shells trying to shoot a good score and really not learning that much. Please share your ideas about what you think makes a good productive practice session.


Thanks,Smokit
 

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Cathy Wehinger, ATA HOF and perennial All-American, gets ready for the season by doing 100 gun mount/lifts a day. But today she (and Larry) are watching the "Pack"
 

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It doesn't even have to be for $5.

Lowest score buys at the Dairy Queen or something similar.
 

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If you can, stop shooting rounds and begin shooting stations.
Especially the stations and presentations that give you the most problems....
Shooting rounds for score is not the most effective practice.
Set up some goals for yourself.

For instance, if you are having problems with one and / or five with the hard lefts and rights, then stay on one or five for 25 shots, especially if you can lock the trap from auto to manual (simply a flick of a switch).

a coach once told me....

Do not practice until you get it Right.... but rather practice until you cannot get it Wrong.

There is a BIG difference between the two.

Art
 

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I second the idea of shooting just stations, but I don't lock the trap.

I don't want to know exactly where the target is going. I want to practice THAT station just the way I'll shoot it in competition. If hard lefts from #1 are biting me, I'll shoot 10 at #1...I'll be sure to get a few hard lefts and be surprised when I do. Then I'll go to a different station for 5 and back to the problem station for 10 more. I want to walk out to a station, make a perfect set-up and be alert and ready for whatever comes out.
 

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Today I worked on my lead and follow through. Some of the birds were a long way out before I pulled the trigger but I wanted to practice tracking the clay and being smooth. A couple times I was on the bird but getting there was ruff so I stopped my swing and started chasing the clay again. Someday's I will focus on my bead and were is is in relation to the clay when I pull the trigger or focus on follow through. I usually don't worry about my scores the days I do some of this stuff because I'm trying to improve and I find a few rounds of focusing on this or that translates to better shooting and better awareness of where the clay is in relation to the bead, how much lead i'm using and how my swing is.
 

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GW22 is a trap hustler. he has had me on the long hustle for a while anytime I bet him he whoops me. If we just shoot I beat him put a five on it and he comes to life. os
 

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If you want to make your practice worth it, also try different hold points and soft focus heights beyond your barrel. And do it at each station. Try some holding lower on 1 and 5, and higher on 2,3,4, etc.
 

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mike Campbell, as usual, has it right. Practice one post at a time and don't lock the trap.

I might also add, if you are practicing for singles, shoot from 18 yards. If you are practicing for 20 yard handicap, shoot from 22 yards. If you are practicing for 27 yards...kiss my ***! You shouldn't be asking this question on this site! Martinpicker
 

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One of the hall of famers Mark Arie when asked about his many years of very fine shooting and his averages replied "I mount my gun in the evening 300 times". That was his practice of getting his mount the same every time. Must have worked for him over his years of shooting one can look in the books and see his many records and championships. He has been gone over fifty years.
If some of these helpful hints aren't what you are looking for I would suggest to find a coach who has an excellent record and use the advice they can give you. Good luck with your game. Dan
 

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A good way to look at your question is that if you shoot alot of practice and like to shoot,use the mind set of practicing to improve.Keep a journal of each round as you try different things whatever they may be and record succeses and failures.This helps me alot especially when Im working with a new gun ect.If you pattern your gun take some pictures and notes as with todays camera technology it is easy and a good way to keep records as opposed to(I remember it was this or that)Also by keeping a journal you will not waste time with things that you have tried and did not get the desired results.Hope this helps George
 

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Shoot every target as though the Grand championship is on the line. Always use the same intense focus you would during an ATA event.

One thing we've learned that really helps on the hard angles, when on post 1 & 5, hold on the opposite corner of the house during practice. You're swinging the gun a lot farther, but you learn that the birds aren't going to get away from you. When you go back to your normal hold position, the angles seem so slow (because you're moving the gun much less) that you crush them with ease.

Also be careful to whom you listen for advice. There are an awful lot of shooters willing to offer an opinion, especially when out practicing. I doubt they do it intentionally, but many of them are searching for answers themselves and can send you in the wrong direction in a hurry.
 

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Pay your money and dry fire a round. You'll soon see what you are doing because you won't be dealing with recoil. It works quickly and well.

Good luck.
 

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doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results will not do the trick!

See if you have problematic stations or targets.Change things and see what's happen.Take a break after 50 shots and analyze what you did. Set up realistic goals and be committed to them.Stop shooting if you are tired. Ask for help if things are going out of control!

Good luck!
 

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None of the above information is wrong. Your partly on your way since your mindset has changed from shooting a round to practice. YOU have to put some effort into the results you want. The things I've done......
1. Got 2 books from James Russel and got some great direction.
2. At first I didn't believe the gun mount exercise stuff but it's important. When you go to a shoot you wouldn't believe what adrenaline can do. I've mounted my gun and thought I've grabbed the wrong gun from the rack.
3. Journal entries are important and the first step is to practice with a purpose and stick to it. You'll be tempted to just fall in with the guys and "shoot the round" and practice goes out the window.
4. The last tip I'm really thinking about is getting a Terry Jordan wall chart. You accomplish gun mounts and move to the targets together and like above.....don't waste ammo.

Best wishes on your journey........I'm addicted
Kurt
 
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