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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this old radio (see pics). Got it from an old, old lady at a flower shop years ago and it has been sitting on a shelf in my home for the last 25 years at least.
I don't know if it works because I have not and probably will not plug it in.
I have looked on the net for similar pics and models but I can find nothing that matches this thing. It seems to have some kind of Broadcast setting but I don't know for sure??? There are no apparent cracks or outside damage to be seen. I have not removed the back so i don't know about that part except that I know it does have the inter-workings.....
If I sell this, I will donate 100% of the money to one of my classes to pay for student materials fees.
Does anyone know anything about this radio?


Electronics Technology Electronic device Radio Antique


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This is fun stuff for an electronics history geek. That is a 1950's CONELRAD [CONtrol of ELectronic RADiation] radio. It had the emergency broadcast option built into it. It was to be used in the event of a Soviet attack on the United States, when all commercial radio stations would stop broadcasting so that Soviet bombers couldn't use our radio signals as navigation beacons. CONELRAD stations would broadcast on either 604kHz or 1240kHz. All radios sold after 1953 were required to have the CONELRAD frequencies 640/1240 kHz. You see the little triangle on the dial? There should be one more. The triangles are CD (Civil Defense) marks, and pinpoint the stations. When the Emergency Broadcast System started being used in 1963, these radios were obsoleted.

That's an old vacuum tube radio. It will work if the tubes are not blown or broken. It'll just need time to warm up after you plug it in. Take it outside and plug it in there, if you are scared.

Who made that one? Is there a brand name on it?
 

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Oh, and you can find more information on this by calling John McCarty at the National Electronics Museum. Tell him that Devi from the AOC told you to call him. He's a friend and fellow board member. He can give you more history and may even be able to tell you how to put a value on it.

Go to the website above to find the phone number. Call the main number and ask for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Very interesting Recurvyarcher & I'll definitely take your suggestion and make that call. The Brand on it is "Philco".
I did take it out and plug it in but then decided to just wait and maybe let someone else mess with it.... The tubes did start to glow but I wonder about the integrity of the insulation on the circuitry.
Anyway, I'll call your friend and post what he has to say.
Thanks, James
 

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Common brand of radio back then. I doubt that there are a lot of them still around that work. That's a cool piece of history you have there. Please pm me after you talk with John. I'd be interested in more information just for kicks.

!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
recurvyarcher, I never did have any luck getting in touch with anyone at the museum website as suggested in your earlier post but I did talk one of my neighbors who repairs old radios.
I did find out that the radio is a 1953 model. It has what is known as Telechron Movement and was capable of broadcasting at one watt. Now I don't understand how this thing can broadcast but it has a switch on the back that is labeled "Broadcast" and has a rating of 1 watt of output power. The gentleman I spoke with said he didn't know for sure either.....
These sell for around $100 - $299 to collectors.
If anyone is interested, I would ship to your door for $110 and donate that amount (minus shipping cost)to a worthy student/school activity.
Thanks, James
 
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