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POOR REACTIONS TO MISSED TARGETS

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Wrong reactions to missed targets.



Watching the targets of the squads ahead of me during a shoot allows me to see how the targets are set and the if the angles are correct. While doing this I also get to see some of the interesting reactions of the shooter’s when they miss a target! Some of them are down right funny and others are, at the very least, unproductive.



They include:



  • Flipping the head back and bending the knees.
  • Looking around to see if anyone saw the miss.
  • Throwing the offending empty shell on the ground.
  • Cursing in anger…usually with a head-bob.


All of these are amusing…but the net result of this is more missed targets. These types of actions will affect your attitude and concentration for the worse! A lost target requires no drama or theatrics. It’s already history and there’s not a thing you can do to bring it back.



You should remain calm, forget about the lost target and concentrate on the next target comng out of the house. Never change your routine, you need the positive energy your pre-shot routine gives you to continue to break a good score. You really only have to “super concentrate” for about 5 seconds for every shot. Keep focused on the task between shots and really work hard for the few seconds it takes to break the target. Think positive thoughts while you shoot and leave the drama out!



So go and have a positive, fun day with 100 straight in mind!



Keep smiling …. Because I am!



Sandra Jo Jack
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I'm of the school.that. believes that a small show.of disgust can be beneficial. Get it off your chest and move on! I'm not saying you should go into.a mind altering hissy fit but a shake.of the head or a grumble under the breath can get you past the poor performance and ready for.the next bird Bottling up.the rage, disappointment and/or disgust might not be a good thing
 

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I used to love watching Adam Vella, a medalist at the Atlanta games, shoot Olympic trap. First barrel, second barrel or the dreaded hooter, his reaction was absolutely identical.
Open the gun, catch the shell/s, carefully reload, wait for the next shooter, walk to the next station and calmly set himself for the following shot.
As opposed to a young lady I nicknamed “shell thrower”..

An observer who doesn’t watch the target, or hear the call, should not know what the result was by your reaction. you are fooling yourself if you think even a head shake helps.
 

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Wrong reactions to missed targets.



Watching the targets of the squads ahead of me during a shoot allows me to see how the targets are set and the if the angles are correct. While doing this I also get to see some of the interesting reactions of the shooter’s when they miss a target! Some of them are down right funny and others are, at the very least, unproductive.



They include:



  • Flipping the head back and bending the knees.
  • Looking around to see if anyone saw the miss.
  • Throwing the offending empty shell on the ground.
  • Cursing in anger…usually with a head-bob.


All of these are amusing…but the net result of this is more missed targets. These types of actions will affect your attitude and concentration for the worse! A lost target requires no drama or theatrics. It’s already history and there’s not a thing you can do to bring it back.



You should remain calm, forget about the lost target and concentrate on the next target comng out of the house. Never change your routine, you need the positive energy your pre-shot routine gives you to continue to break a good score. You really only have to “super concentrate” for about 5 seconds for every shot. Keep focused on the task between shots and really work hard for the few seconds it takes to break the target. Think positive thoughts while you shoot and leave the drama out!



So go and have a positive, fun day with 100 straight in mind!



Keep smiling …. Because I am!



Sandra Jo Jack
I try not to let anyone know I missed a target. But sometimes you have kick your own but to get back on track. I seldom if ever miss a target while finishing a post that I totally screwed up a shot on or the post after that. But some screw ups need a kicking your oun but reaction just to unwind from why I/you screwed up so badly.

Shake it off or act it off then get back in there with a good focus. No two people or alike so why make one rule for everyone. Trying to conform will wind people up more than any reaction to a missed target ever will.

Al
 

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I try and follow the teachings of the late English Olympic Trapshooter Kevin Gill. If you miss a target, open a box in your mind put that lost target in it and close the lid and move onto the next target. Yes, I have been know to get a little rattled missing a target and eject the spent shell onto the ground. I try and not do that, but sometimes when I have not shot a lot for a while it happens. If things are working well, I catch the spent shell and put it in my vest pocket or in the bucket in front of me and if I miss I do the same and move on. It's not good to disturb your thought chain and throwing a shell can do this as well as upsetting other shooters on your squad.
Devonian.
 

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Physically I do not react to misses any different than I do to hit's, I know why I missed and make a mental note about the target and the angle of it and where I missed it, carry on to the next, the longer you pout about a miss the more likely you are to miss another one, just like in golf don't compound a mistake with another mistake :unsure:
 

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I like to slowly drop my head, firmly grip my shotgun by the muzzle end with both hands, take 2 deep breaths and on the last exhale start my Olympic hammer throw technique sending my gun down range!
Seriously though, a bad reaction to a miss is something I see far too often with my young shooters. I try my best to get ahold of this situation before it is a habit. I kinda have to be an ass sometimes to get them to stop. One of my favorite things to tell them is “there’s nothing we can do about that miss. It is history. We cannot change it or bring the shot back for a redo. Odds are that several people saw the miss. No need to start chicken flopping, foot stomping or yelling Come on man. Let’s not dwell on that shot and let’s start concentrating on the next one. Let’s not get dramatic over missing a clay. It takes more muscle movement to throw a fit and act a fool than It does to regain our composer and concentrate on crushing this next one.” I have no idea if that last statement is true and glad I’ve not been called out by a kid wanting me to prove it.
The boys seem to be more dramatic than the girls.


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Was at a local shoot, I was on the porch standing behind a former flame, guy she came to watch,, every target he missed, (and was many) he would bite the empty hull, then throw it behind him, I acted like i didnt know who she was with, I said, That guy looks like a drama queen, and a lousy shooter!!. I bet shooting isn't his only weakness. and walked away,, she called me the next week,
 

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Bad day shooting always beats a hard day working! ;)

I remember awhile back I went a very long time with no trap time and rather than start back off with singles I went right away back to doubles which I used to be above average at, but holy hell was I terrible that day! Out of 90 targets I think I managed to hit like 5. My reactions after all the misses had the people I was with almost on the ground laughing. Shame no one recorded it because I would have put it on YouTube in a heart beat!

This next story is not trap related, but instead video game related so don't read anymore if you don't care for them. Anways 2 nights ago I was playing Majora's Mask and I was getting really frustrated at a certain part and normally I don't get mad enough to do what I did, but I got so mad that I put the controller on my knee and punched it with all my might and before my fist hit the controller it slipped off my knee and my full power punch hit my knee so hard that it almost instantly bruised and I couldn't put all my weight on it the next day while walking. Yet another thing that I wish I had recorded.
 

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For to long I was that guy, I allowed my anger to control my shooting. Which lead to a lot of really bad scores. I don't know if I thought I was better than I was or what. Until I started really listening to the people trying to help me things stayed the same. then the light turned on. Scores went up and I was having fun again. I still let a few choice words fly, when I do something stupid, but for the most part I am in control. Believe me it took way to long to get it. Now I get to watch others who need that push in the right direction. As I was always told, take every suggestion try them and use what works. It worked for me.
 

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While I'm a big offender of this I wish I wasn't. I honestly try to not let my emotions get the best of me, but I guess I'm just hotheaded. I work on it and I'm getting better but I'm still not there yet. This is a good thread revealing me what people really think of showing your emotions on the trapline.

Thanks!
 
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