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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of mine is a new shooter and is using a sporting clays gun that shoots way too flat. I told him he needed to raise the comb to get it to shoot higher.
What should I tell him to make him understand better what I am trying to say.
I have seen this question very effectively explained on this sight in the past.
 

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Simply put...The birds in trap are rising, thus by the time the command goes off in our beady little brain (pull the trigger!), travels through our shoulder and down our arm to our trigger finger, the bird has risen 6" to a foot. Thus the need for a high shoot'n trapgun. Speed of thought process may vary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We shot the gun today and you must completely cover the target to break it well.
I told him trap shooters want the target well above the barrel as the target rises.
My (3) trap guns all shoot 60/40 or 70/30..

jbm
 

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Just making sure. Why don't you just tell him what you told me? A couple of strips of moleskin on the top of the comb should nail the message down for him. You are doing the right thing helping a newer shooter get his gun right; we should all be willing to do the same.

Neil
 

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Brwy, this may be of some help. A while back I plotted trajectories of targets and shot in AutoCad. I used the ballistics data from Ed Lowry's Shotshell ballistics for Windows. It lead to some surprising findings.

For a regulation target broken 34 yards from the shooter you need a 75/25 shooter to compensate for the targets rate of climb if you shoot sustained lead. Said another way, if sustain lead a target and fire with the bead just kissing the rim of the target, you gun must shoot 6.6" higher than you aimed to venter the target in the pattern. That works out to a little over 7.5" at 40 yards. Of course it will be less if the gun is moving faster that the target when you fire, but it gives you the maximum you need to add to just float the bird.

Have you buddy shoot at the intersections of a big tic tac toe sign at 13 yards from muzzle to target. A typical sporting gun is set to shoot somewhere between 50/50 and 60/40. If he hits the intersections he is aiming at, that's flat- 50/50. If the shot is 1" high at 13 yards, that's 60/40. Let's say he shoots 1" high. You want to get to a maximum of 2.5" high at 13 yards. So add enough height to the comb to add another inch on the board. 2" at 13 yds is a 70/30 shooter, and an awful lot of people are happy with a setup around that. You can fine tune it from there.
 

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ZZT, that's the most accurate advice I've seen in some time for shooters guidelines to POI information. Good job guy! My personal numbers for 16s are 9 inches high and 15 for the 27 for my timing to the targets. Hap
 
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