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The only gun in my collection that has a name. Old Clem, because it looks like the gun my dad used to hunt with then I was a boy.

His name was John Clement, but his family all called him Clem because his father (my grandfather) was also named John.

Ithaca Model 37 in 16 gauge.

1732270
 

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Two of my six Model 37s are 16s – one made in 1941 and the other about 65 years later. I love them both equally.
This one is a 1952 model. No rib.
 
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Great gun for upland.
The best I've ever handled, bar none. Nothing comes up and swings on fast-moving upland birds as smoothly and quickly as a Model 37. Now exactly why that is, I can't tell you.

With the bottom ejection, you can almost always find your spent shells. They're generally a few feet directly in front of you.
 

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They are being made in Upper Sandusky, Ohio now, close to me. They would work well for a lefty like me.
Doug
I "think" there is a kit to swap the cross bolt safety to work for a left hander.
 

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I have one in 12 ga. sitting next to my bed. Yes, the safety can be swapped to left.

An excellent pheasant gun, Tim, and thanks for sharing your memories!
 

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My dad purchases a model 37 16 gauge from a pawn shop in in 1960. When I was 12 years old I carried it empty on several pheasant hunts. One day when we were going hunting dad handed me a old box of Montgomery Ward paper 16 gauge shells and said "the guys have decided you are ready to hunt". Shot my first and many pheasants and ducks with that gun. Dad gave it to me several years back with a smile on his face and said "let me know if it still works". Well it does. Did a little research on it as I could never find the choke marking on it. It is ordinance marked and turns out to be one of the guns the military purchased in WWII for tail gunners to practice their leads.
 
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