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If I get coil springs, why do I need a drop-trigger?

Your thoughts are solicited.

Thanks.
 

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Do the coil spring triggers allow you to switch the shooting order? I though that was the whole purpose of the drop trigger.

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If I get coil springs, why do I need a drop-trigger?

Your thoughts are solicited.

Thanks.
If you get a drop trigger coil spring Perazzi and you want to be able to change you firing order, you'll have to pay a premium to get a trigger with either an internal barrel selector, or an external barrel selector. Almost all fixed trigger Perazzis have a safety/barrel selector on the top tang. I've got both.

Now, if you're trying to pick between a drop trigger Perazzi and fixed trigger Perazzi, for trap, I don't think one has a shooting advantage over the other. The drop trigger is probably easier to clean, and slightly easier to service (if you ever need to).
For sporting clays, I prefer a fixed trigger Perazzi with the safety/selector on the top tang
Drop trigger Perazzis are probably more popular in the U.S. (mostly probably for the 'gee whiz' factor), but parts for both seem fairly easy to come by.
 

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Drop out trigger allows one to swap triggers with ease. I shoot a double release and like the fact I can easily put a pull trigger back in if the need should arise (e.g., if I wanted to sell the gun, or let a buddy shoot it, or if I want to shoot a pull trigger). Leaf springs are very easy to replace on the drop out triggers. The fixed trigger guns are cheaper for Perazzi to make and they don’t hold their resale value around here like the drop out guns. I’ve heard it said the fixed trigger guns are more reliable. I’m not sure what that means or if that is the case?
 

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Most shooters I know that have a drop trigger have a backup trigger. If a hammer spring breaks you simply put in the backup trigger and keep shooting.
With a fixed trigger if a hammer spring breaks the squad either goes on without you or waits quite awhile you replace the spring. I'd advocate for the former
and the squad keeps shooting unless you are really good at replacing springs on a fixed trigger gun.
 

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Coil springs will weaken, take a set, and would need to be replaced at certain intervals based on how much you shoot.
When I had a coil spring trigger in my TM1 I would replace spring at the start of my target year.
The old spring would be about 1/4” shorter.
BTW, I shoot a release so might not affect you as much with a pull trigger.
 

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Drop out trigger allows one to swap triggers with ease. I shoot a double release and like the fact I can easily put a pull trigger back in if the need should arise (e.g., if I wanted to sell the gun, or let a buddy shoot it, or if I want to shoot a pull trigger). Leaf springs are very easy to replace on the drop out triggers. The fixed trigger guns are cheaper for Perazzi to make and they don’t hold their resale value around here like the drop out guns. I’ve heard it said the fixed trigger guns are more reliable. I’m not sure what that means or if that is the case?
I'd dispute that the "fixed trigger guns are cheaper to make...and don't hold their resale value..." First, I'd think the number of parts between the two is about the same, so I wouldn't think there'd be too many extra machining steps for either one. Second, compare used Type 4 MX8 prices with used Type 4 MX12 prices on gunbroker.com and other websites, and you'll see MX12s tend to go for more. As for reliability, I'd say a fixed trigger coil spring gun would be as reliable as a drop trigger with coil springs; maybe even slightly better, as the drop trigger fitting into the receiver presents another point for fitting or potential slop.

I'd also point out Kim Rhode and George Digweed didn't seem to have any problems winning piles of hardware with their fixed trigger Perazzis (MX12s).
 

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If its Italian its probably fast & exotic & Perazzi is no exception. Given the choice between fixed & drop out triggers Id choose the later & for most of the reasons mentioned. Flat springs deliver a different feel & even sound. Easy fast maintenance & as I said there is the exotic wow factor.

trigger 1.JPG
 

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If you currently have a leaf spring trigger and want a coil spring trigger, factor in the cost of a new Locking Block also. There is a special Locking Block for coil spring triggers that pushes the bottom hammer back (when the top lever is opened) to allow the bottom firing pin to withdraw from the fired primer.

Don Rackley
 

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If you currently have a leaf spring trigger and want a coil spring trigger, factor in the cost of a new Locking Block also. There is a special Locking Block for coil spring triggers that pushes the bottom hammer back (when the top lever is opened) to allow the bottom firing pin to withdraw from the fired primer.

Don Rackley
. Don, does this make the lever harder to move ,compared to the leaf spring trigger as it's moving the hammer?
 

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If you currently have a leaf spring trigger and want a coil spring trigger, factor in the cost of a new Locking Block also. There is a special Locking Block for coil spring triggers that pushes the bottom hammer back (when the top lever is opened) to allow the bottom firing pin to withdraw from the fired primer.

Don Rackley
Speaking of that, Don, check your email. I sent you one from the Contact Us form on your website asking about the availability of MT6/MX12 locking blocks. I need one.
 

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If you currently have a leaf spring trigger and want a coil spring trigger, factor in the cost of a new Locking Block also. There is a special Locking Block for coil spring triggers that pushes the bottom hammer back (when the top lever is opened) to allow the bottom firing pin to withdraw from the fired primer.

Don Rackley
I wonder why Perazzi (and the aftermarket), doesn't just default to having all their locking blocks do this; it probably doesn't cost much (if any) extra to make, and it doesn't hurt the function of leaf spring triggers. I'd think it'd be easier to just make and stock one part instead of two.
 

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If you currently have a leaf spring trigger and want a coil spring trigger, factor in the cost of a new Locking Block also. There is a special Locking Block for coil spring triggers that pushes the bottom hammer back (when the top lever is opened) to allow the bottom firing pin to withdraw from the fired primer.

Don Rackley
Good Morning Don, I am intrigued....any chance of a picture showing the difference of the special locking block for coil springs.
 

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I owned Perazzi guns with both trigger types and I could not tell any difference between them performance wise. I had a leaf spring drop-out non-selectable trigger on my Perazzi MX2000/8 trap gun and a coil spring non-drop-out selectable trigger on my Perazzi MX12L sporting clays gun. I very much prefer the above configuration for each discipline respectively. I always fire bottom barrel in trap (or bottom barrel first in doubles) so, there is no need for barrel selector, which makes trigger mechanism simpler and more reliable. For sporting clays, I definitely like barrel selector on the tang near safety where I can always easily see which barrel is currently selected and change it if needed.
 

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Now that you can get leaf springs for Perazzi that don't break, why go to coil. Even when I had to use Perazzi springs, I would not have changed. I bought three complete sets of matched weight leaf springs from Mile High Shooting, and their tool pouch and kit. I did have to change a spring, on the line, in the middle of a sub-event. Since I had the pouch on my belt, it took 60 seconds and I was back to shooting.

FWIW, Kerry Allor is an expert on Perazzi triggers. When he was doing mine (leaf spring) he told me his trigger job would last at least 15,000 pulls. If it was leaf springs, it would last forever.

BTW, mine was an unsingle combo. So I never needed a barrel selector.
 
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