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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I still cannot believe this happened ... I always shot with the rib all the way down... never noticed ... until I did
Can anything be done??
1752034
1752035
 

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I still cannot believe this happened ... I always shot with the rib all the way down... never noticed ... until I did
Can anything be done??
View attachment 1752034 View attachment 1752035
The answer is yes it can be fixed, but it's going to be expensive.
As an alternative, a machinist or gunsmith can make or reshape a rib adjuster to fit bottom notch that exist now.
 

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How I would do it would be to machine the notches out completely, drill and counterbore a hole from the front, screw in a new block, and recut the notches. Not a huge deal, although it'd be a little cosmetically different.

If you want to it to stay original, the only repair would be to have it melted off and a new one soldered on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Someone told be that new metal could be welded on in that area.. and possibly, a couple new notches could be filed and cut in. Possible?

Yes, MG, to cause that, the front and back rib would need to be badly out of sync and repeated firing torqued the hell out of the muzzle. Either that or a hard drop of the gun on that end.

I am not a long-time owner, and the damage was hidden from me. Sure, I wish I had inspected closer... live and learn
 

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15 min with a dovetail file! {A dovetail file only cuts on one surface of the three sides} clean up the female slot first then file down the the male part to match. a little oil to keep from further damage and rust prevention. your not out anything the damage has already been done.

I would suggest being a little more gentle when putting gun in the gun rack and check the way you store the old girl in your gun case. that might also be your culprit.

Also check the spring pressure on the male piece if its weak it will cause it to bounce when you close the gun each time.
 

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Someone told be that new metal could be welded on in that area.. and possibly, a couple new notches could be filed and cut in. Possible?

Yes, MG, to cause that, the front and back rib would need to be badly out of sync and repeated firing torqued the hell out of the muzzle. Either that or a hard drop of the gun on that end.

I am not a long-time owner, and the damage was hidden from me. Sure, I wish I had inspected closer... live and learn
It might be able to be done by micro welding, but I'd be concerned that any heat applied would loosen the solder joint, and at that point you'd be much worse off than you are now.

Honestly looking at the design again, I think my method would be the best short of replacing it (and maybe even better TBH). I'd make the rib and block a LOT closer fit so the cutouts could be cut deeper (and stronger) and the wedge would have more bite. Looks like you might need a new wedge as well.
 

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15 min with a dovetail file! {A dovetail file only cuts on one surface of the three sides} clean up the female slot first then file down the the male part to match. a little oil to keep from further damage and rust prevention. your not out anything the damage has already been done.

I would suggest being a little more gentle when putting gun in the gun rack and check the way you store the old girl in your gun case. that might also be your culprit.

Also check the spring pressure on the male piece if its weak it will cause it to bounce when you close the gun each time.
There's nothing to file, one of the teeth sheared off.
 

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With an expensive gun like yours, I wouldn’t attempt a self-fix. You could cause more damage.
If the gun was mine, I’d ask Don Rackley who to send it to.
John
 

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It might be able to be done by micro welding, but I'd be concerned that any heat applied would loosen the solder joint, and at that point you'd be much worse off than you are now.

Honestly looking at the design again, I think my method would be the best short of replacing it (and maybe even better TBH). I'd make the rib and block a LOT closer fit so the cutouts could be cut deeper (and stronger) and the wedge would have more bite. Looks like you might need a new wedge as well.

I have no first hand experience with that particular joint; however, may of the Perazzi joints are "soft soldered"....such as the O/U side ribs. If that front piece is soft soldered the heat from welding might make it loose.

The soft soldered side ribs are why an MX model O/U must be rust blued instead of hot blued. Just something to consider......
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I will call him... thanks

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Hope a good fix is available. I bet someone can help.
But, this whole thread begs the question of why Perazzi uses a somewhat too simple and potentially weak system to adjust the barrel, rather than a machined, precise, and strong gear and wheel system such as Kolar and Krieghoff use. And I am a perazzi shooter and a big fan of the guns. But that may be a design weakness, not sure.
 
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