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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All:

I'm running into a problem that makes me rethink the way I paint my PFS.

I shoot with a golf glove on my trigger hand. This is to help me have a far more solid grip the plastic PFS grip piece. I grip it firmly, not a death grip. I have tried to shoot without the glove, but it only caused discomfort.

After about 1000 shells there is a dime sized chip out of the paint in roughly the same area.
I am looking for suggestions on how to go about repainting my grip the next time it chips.

I have no desire to shoot a wooden grip or have my PFS hydro-dipped.
I know the glove causes it, so I'm looking to improve the painting process to get more time out of it.



Here is my process:

After using paint thinner to clean the old paint off, I put a coat of primer on and let it dry for an hour.

Second, I spray the first coat of paint/primer on and let that dry in a warm area with the fan on for a day.

Third step is to spray a light second coat of the same paint/primer on and let that dry for four days in the warm area with the fan on.

After done drying, I spray a coat of clear enamel designed for plastics. Dry for one day.

Final step is to put a second coat of clear enamel on. Dry it until I shoot next.



Any suggestions would be appreciated.

My initial thoughts may be to extend how long each step has to dry.

Or possibly remove the primer in step one as my spray paint color is paint/primer for plastics.

Thank you in advance.
 

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To me, paint that chips indicates poor adhesion.

I can understand the glove abrading the surface, but I can't conceive how the glove would make the paint chip.

If it were mine, I would try a different paint, possibly an epoxy.
 

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You need auto paint and clear coat, two part. Rattle cans aren't and won't cut it. You are trying to paint nylon, which isn't easy in and of itself.
 

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Didn't try to alter the grip, rather tried to alter for-end wood to color match the grip? Given the for-end wood needed a little TLC the end product looks like a match to the PFC grip.
 

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I have hydro dipped a few grips and the first thing is you have to burn off the release agent that is in the grips before you paint them.
I saw a video on painting plastic type items. And this worked / works for me.
A lot of plastic items are produced in molds that have a release agent. The release agent gets into the plastic and has to be removed with heat.
I have a small torch I use and you can see the agent come to the top. Then I wipe off with alcohol.
mike
 

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Didn't see anywhere that you actually sanded the parts before spraying either primer or paint. If the pieces are not properly prepared and sanded, you will never get good adhesion. I have had many PFS sets airbrushed and hydro-dipped and have never had a problem. Most of the work is in the prep. Hope that helps. Good shooting, Rey
 

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I've painted my PFS lots of times, with many types of paint. I found the best paint to use is the Home Depot spray paint for plastic. Clean the grip with alcohol, lightly sand and featheredge the chips. Then shoot the plastic paint on. You don't need anything else. Works for me. And I use a golf glove. When it gets really hot and the glove gets wet I sprinkle some powder I bought for gripping bowling balls on the glove. It's will not slip then at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
After I have the paint on and it has dried, what type of finish would you recommend?

Enamel or laquer?
 

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After I have the paint on and it has dried, what type of finish would you recommend?

Enamel or lacquer?
Spray two coats of gloss on. 20 minutes between coats. And let is set for about 48 hours. Should look great for a long time. I think the paint is enamel gloss, but I'm not sure. The spray can is about $6.00 or so. I used black and painted the forearm as well. I've also painted them gold, silver, red, and my favorite for comments "Pearl Lime Green" but that was with an airbrush. This is on a Ljutic Mono, and a Beretta 303. Anything to make that ugly PFS look better. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Didn't see anywhere that you actually sanded the parts before spraying either primer or paint. If the pieces are not properly prepared and sanded, you will never get good adhesion. I have had many PFS sets airbrushed and hydro-dipped and have never had a problem. Most of the work is in the prep. Hope that helps. Good shooting, Rey

I failed to mention it above. After stripping, I lightly sand and wipe down with alcohol.
 

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You need auto paint and clear coat, two part. Rattle cans aren't and won't cut it. You are trying to paint nylon, which isn't easy in and of itself.
Does anyone know for sure what type of plastic the grips are? I would have GUESSED glass filled lexan, but I do not know.
 

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Hydro dipping is the go.
Picked a color from approx. 30 different patterns, wife loves it.
If I remember correctly about $200 for the grip and cheek piece.
I found a company close to me off the net and two days later this was the result.

Release Trigger…...Downunder.


GUNS 035.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What grit of sandpaper?

I'm considering 800 grit for prepping the grip and sanding the primer.
 

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Hello All:

I'm running into a problem that makes me rethink the way I paint my PFS.

I shoot with a golf glove on my trigger hand. This is to help me have a far more solid grip the plastic PFS grip piece. I grip it firmly, not a death grip. I have tried to shoot without the glove, but it only caused discomfort.

After about 1000 shells there is a dime sized chip out of the paint in roughly the same area.
I am looking for suggestions on how to go about repainting my grip the next time it chips.

I have no desire to shoot a wooden grip or have my PFS hydro-dipped.
I know the glove causes it, so I'm looking to improve the painting process to get more time out of it.



Here is my process:

After using paint thinner to clean the old paint off, I put a coat of primer on and let it dry for an hour.

Second, I spray the first coat of paint/primer on and let that dry in a warm area with the fan on for a day.

Third step is to spray a light second coat of the same paint/primer on and let that dry for four days in the warm area with the fan on.

After done drying, I spray a coat of clear enamel designed for plastics. Dry for one day.

Final step is to put a second coat of clear enamel on. Dry it until I shoot next.



Any suggestions would be appreciated.

My initial thoughts may be to extend how long each step has to dry.

Or possibly remove the primer in step one as my spray paint color is paint/primer for plastics.

Thank you in advance.
I do not see on your list where you sprayed with plastic adhesion promoter.

This will be your primer. Then paint any color you wish. Cover with several coats of 2k clear. All can be had in rattle cans. MUST have ventilation.
 

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I think you would use cerakote and blast the plastic
here is a Glock frame I cerakoted it has held up well
Don


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