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Jan. 21, 1893 Sporting Life


One of the published exchanges between E.D. Fulford (winner of the 1898 GAH), Thomas S. Dando (later shooting editor of Sporting Life), Capt "Jack" Brewer, and James H. Worden regarding Fulford’s withdrawl of his commitment to shoot a match at the Riverton Gun Club (Penn.) when informed the prize would be only $50.


Jan. 12, 1893 To E. D. Fulford

— Dear Sir: Your telegrams received by me today. I consider this one of the rankest, stinkenest, dirty deals that one who poses as a man could possibly inflict upon another. I always thought there was some manhood about you while I was perfectly cognizant of the fact that there was very little sand, but I now rank your sand above your manhood in about the same proportion that a mosquito bears to an elephant, a pollywog to the Atlantic ocean, or in the common acceptation of the term, a monkey to a man. Any man who will stoop to make offer or use of an excuse such as you have made in this case - namely, that of a $50 note with chances of winning it and posing as the champion wingshot of the United States ought to be booted off of every shooting ground in the United States.


Any man who will deliberately ask of a friend to enter into and obligate himself to the fulfilling of an engagement for the paltry sum of $50, ought to be hung up by the heels and knocked in the head with a club.
A man who poses as a money maker and in the presence of several witnesses told Jim Elliott that you would go down to them and shoot and if you won would give him the purse, "certainly knew that the purse was to be contested for, not donated," as all you wanted out of it was your expenses, and then turn round and say in your telegram to me today that "we don't propose to be laughed at and walk home," is a duffer pure and simple and of the rottenest class. I wrote Mr. Dando, enclosing my letter to him as follows:


“I leave for the Riverton Gun Club much space to extract from these telegrams. The sweetness evidently born of a full grown "posy" of the Hi-lo Jack-ass class self styled champion, and ask that they exonerate me for having had any dealings with such Farce-Acular Yaller."


I am sir, very devoutly, J. H. WORDEN.

Makes us sound downright delicate here on trapshooters.com in 2014 :)
 

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George McAlpin assaulted Capt. Money in his office at the "E.C." American Powder Co. Dec. 28, 1900 related to a disagreement over handicapping.


http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1901/VOL_36_NO_18/SL3618014.pdf

The trial of Geo. S. McAlpin for assault on Capt. A. W. Money was called
January 10 in New York. The defendant'sattorney argued for a postponement
until February 18, stating that an important witness for his client could not be on hand until that date. The Magistrate granted the postponement and McAlpin was held in $300 bail, having previously been paroled in the custody of his attorney.


http://library.la84.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1901/VOL_36_NO_22/SL3622014.pdf

Geo. S. McAlpin has resigned from the Carteret Gun Club, of New York, at
least it is so reported. His resignation is a result of his attack on Captain A.
W. Money some few weeks ago. Two factions were immediately formed in
the Carteret Club one demanding McAlpin's resignation and the other fighting
to keep him in the club. This fight became so bitter that it threatened the very foundation of the organization. At a stormy meeting on last Monday night
McAlpin withdrew from membership of the Carteret Gun Club.
 
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Fulford was one of the great (largely unkonwn today) shooters of the time. He shot with the best and often won. He also was an inventor like so many other trapshooters, patenting a live bird trap and single trigger.

I believe he was only 41 when he died.

One of my many hero's of the period.

Kenny Ray
 

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E. D. Fulford, the winner of the 1898 GAH, has been at the traps as a professional shot for five or six years, during which time he has won many honors. He claims an unofficial record of over 400 live birds killed without a miss.

He is at present a shooting representative of the Remington Arms Co., and used a Remington hammerless gun weighing 7 3/4 lbs., 3 1/2 Schultze powder in U. M. C. Trap shells, three inches in length; 1 1/4 oz. No. 7 shot.


1897 at Watson's Park, Chicago





DEATH OF E. D. FULFORD.

Elijah D. Fulford, famous the world over as a trap shot, died at his home in Utica, N. Y., Oct. 15, 1904 after a brief illness, of pneumonia. Mr. Fulford was 41 years of age, and for several years past had been employed as a shooting representative by the Union Metallic Cartridge Company and the Remington Arms Co. He was a faithful worker and never lost an opportunity to promote the interests of his employers.


In 1892 Mr. Fulford established a name among shooters all over the world by defeating J. L. Brewer, at that time the acknowledged champion wing shot of the world. Fulford killed 100 birds straight and Brewer killed 99. In preliminary practice and in the match Fulford scored 421 birds straight, a feat which undoubtedly will never be equalled. Fulford was a favorite among the shooting fraternity. He was always good natured, genial and entertaining. He was an honest, wholesouled sportsmen and delighted in surrounding
himself with a crowd and relating his experiences at trap and field. He was an inventor of considerable note, his greatest achievement being the Fulford single trigger. He also invented an automatic target trap of great merit, besides many other things.


Mr. Fulford was a native of Bridgeport, Conn. Besides his wife he leaves three brothers, John W., of Morristown, N. J.: Thomas B., of Schenectady, N. Y., and Robert, of Dillon, Mass.


January 2, 1904 "The American Field" courtesy of David Noreen

 

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Elijah D. Fulford was first shooting a Greener in 1895, used a Francotte in 1896 most likely because he became a representative for Francotte.

He settled in with the Remington about 1897 or so, again most likely because he went to work for Remington.

Most folks don't know that he was a construction foreman for American Telegram and Telegraph Company and superverised the installation of lines from New York to Chicago.

His inventions were not always trapshooting related (live bird trap, trap puller, single trigger, perfected single trigger) as he also invented a device for setting telegraph poles.

He became the Champion of the United States in 1891 when he defeated Capt. John L. Brewer, another of our great shooters who remains largely unknown.

Fulford was a member of the the U.M.C. Squad and also organized the several gun clubs in Tennessee.

His patent for a target trap was granted in 1909, 5 years after his death.

He was so well-liked that shooters across the country made contributions for a huge monument at his grave. Annie Oakley sent a contribution and provided flowers at his funeral. Annie's husband Frank Butler and Jack Fanning were two of the bearers carrying his casket.

In my mind . . . . another Hall of Fame shooter for sure.

Kenny Ray
 

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Grunt:

Yes, its in Utica, NY at the New Forest Cemetery.

I had fellow trapshooters from New York locate the memorial and they sent me a picture several years ago. I'll see if I can locate it.

Here's what was reported on it.

Kenny Ray

W. H. Heer and F. D. Kelsey Were the High Average Winners – Hopkins Won
First Merchandise Prize.

Utica, N. Y., June 17. – The 47th annual convention of the N. Y. S. A. F. T. P. O. F. A. G. was held here this week under the auspices of the Oneida County Sportsmen’s Association. It was the most successful New York State shoot held in years and the feeling among the State men was that The new life and spirit shown would make the future N. Y. State meets of old-time importance.

On Tuesday morning the shooters attended the unveiling of the E. D. Fulford monument at New Forest Cemetery. The exercises were impressive and attended by all of the visiting sportsmen, which showed the high esteem in which their late comrade was held.

Sporing Life, June 24, 1905, page 23


Letter of Appreciation

The following is a copy of a letter sent by the Fulford Monument Committee to Mr. James T. Skelly, who so ably handled the cash and whose continued efforts in this matter had much to do with its successful fulfillment:

Utica, N. Y., June 14. – Mr. James T. Skelly, Du Pont Powder Co., Wilmington, Del. – Dear Sir: Now that the Fulford Monument has been erected in a most satisfactory manner to all concerned, we, the committee, take the present opportunity of thanking you for the pains you have taken in this matter. While we have each put forth every effort to make it a success, we feel that you, in acting as treasurer, have done more than your share and again we extend our heart-felt thanks for the conscientious and business-like manner in which you handled the funds entrusted to your care by the sportsmen of America. Yours very truly,

T. H. KELLER,
J. S. FANNING
J. A. R. ELLIOTT,
FRANK E. BUTLER,
Committee.

[ SPORTING LIFE, June 24, 1905, page 22 ]
 

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LOL. Somehow I get the feeling those guys were glad he didn't accept the challenge?

Thanks Kenny for the info and picture of his monument in Utica, NY.

HAP
 

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Rebel Sympathy The only thing that's changed is that $50 is a big winners purse today.

Drew and Kenny nice look back, I didn't know much about Fulford. It does seem he should be in the HOF for sure. Keep the good stuff coming.

Brad
 

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It's too bad a Hurt Feelings Form wasn't available to the gun club management. They could have filled it out and sent it into the ATA EC for consideration of a penalty and expulsion of Mr. Fulford from trap shooting. Fulford, on his part, could have requested the return of all the traps being used at the time as a penalty to the club with the hurt feelings.
 
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