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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone on here knows about house water filtering and water softener systems?

Just got my water results back and it's a total mess so I need to figure out what I need to get. I have a new well system (3HP, 20 gpm) with the following issues:<BR>
1) LOTS and lots of sediment.<BR>
2) VERY hard water, 18 GPG.<BR>
3) High pH levels, 7.8.<BR>
4) Slightly elevated Arsenic<BR>
5) Slightly elevated Tannin<BR>
6) High TDS levels, 384. General catch-all.<BR>

Here is what I have so far. I have 2 Big Blue sediment filters that look to be the 10" models. Also have 2 floor standing tanks that were in the house for the old arsenic system that never worked. I can reuse the current filters and tanks for the new softener system, but what am I supposed to do about issues #3 to #6? I see that each of those problems is a separate tank with different media so I can't have 5 tanks in a row. For one, I don't have the space and two I REALLY don't want to have weak water pressure in the house. I like having good pressure at the taps.

Thanks
 

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I am in the water business. Talk to your neighbors or water company before you buy anything from a water treatment company salesman. You can easily waste thousands of dollars. Is this your own well? Ron
 

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Depending on monthly water usage

1. 30,000 grain water softener for 18 gpg hardness in water. This size system will not regenerate often and will save on salt consumption. Remember you will only clean or be regenerating ~ 80% of the resin bed capasity every cleaning.
2. You should also chlorinate your water with a seperate system for bacteria or any other living organism in the well water.
3. pH is high (7 being neutral <7 acid, >7 alkaline) but not extremely alkaline. Should be easy to fix.
4. Slightly elevated arsenic and tannin(assuming tannis acid from decaying vegetation)-Treat Drinking water only R/O system which will also remove the chlorine you will be adding to the water.
5.The TDS which is total disolved solids could be a number of thing inclusive of the hardness and sediment in your water. However, depending on where the well is you could have other problems. If the well is at the base of a hill side, sometimes you could be tapped into or through a salt vein. You will not taste the salt with the other contaminants present i.e. Hardness(calcium carbonate) and so on. Because the water softener thru ion exchange removes the calcium ion and replaces it with a sodium ion, this could add enough sodium to effect the taste. Under normal circumstances where no sodium is present in the initial water source the water softener will not add an appreciable amount of sodium to taste.

Contact more then 1 company and compare each analysis.

Just my opinion take it for what it is worth. I have been out of the business for 20 years. I am sure that there have been several developements in the water treatment field in the last 20 years that may make this less stressfull on your wallet. I will tell you it will pay off to do your homework and ask the right questions.
Good luck!
Regards, Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #6
ohhh i see this is going to be difficult. i was going to call come local guys, but (no offense to anyone here) i am really weary of them. its one of those things that i feel they will try to sell the world. so before i call them, i wanted to have a good basic understand of what i need so that i can call their BS. thanks
 

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If you are non-technical you need to find a reputable dealer in something besides snake oil.

Culligan has the country saturated with dealers, and a large market share.

That doesn't make them the best for YOUR application. See if there is a GE water tech outfit nearby, and check a couple others.

As stated, reverse osmosis for drinking water is the only way to go. I stayed at a motel in SD where the aroma from the sink made you retch, and across the road the restaurant had sweet good R/O water.

Learn to do your own testing so you won't be flim flammed.

HM
 

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One other part of the equation that would be good to have in your pocket is knowledge of the reservoir, i.e. sand & gravel, limestone, shale. The driller's log should have this information and it will give you a leg up on what & how you need to be treating. Just a guess, but it sounds like shale (acidic, arsenic), and maybe shallow (tannin)? No odor or bad taste from the water?
 

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Take my advice do not call Culligan. You will pay a fortune for the system when someone elese can do it for a fraction of the cost. Drop me a email with you phone number and I can provide you info on whom to contact.
 

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I agree with Blazer1, DO NOT CALL OR DEAL WITH CULLIGAN !!! My mother in law had culligan for over 30 years and after 10 years the salt consuption doubbled every 5 years. All culligan would do was reset the meter and sell her more salt.
It used over 240 lbs of salt a month.
I bought and installed a Home Deop water softner and had the water tested and set machine for the hardness. The same amount of salt would last 5 months !!
And the water tasted great !!!
Tom
 
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