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For Your Viewing Pleasure

Photos of the largest U.S. cities, made about 100 years ago.

That was 100 years ago and not today.....

Enjoy,

Stu

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1.




Woodward Avenue, Detroit , Michigan, in 1917.

2.




Atlantic City, 1910.
Wonder why they're carrying umbrellas - no sun! No rain!

3.




The main street of Memphis , north of Avenue Gayoso, 1910.

4.




Station Louisville-Nashville, Florida , in 1910.

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Forsyth Street, Jacksonville , Florida, in 1910.
Love those cars.

6.




The beach in Atlantic City , 1915.

7.




Grant Avenue after an earthquake in San Francisco in 1906.
I didn't realize there was so much distruction in that earthquake.

8.




Carts for transporting dairy Thompson , Washington , 1927.
How in the world did the dairy get those horses so evenly lined up.

9.




Washington, DC, 1914.
Not so thoughty having those horses run on a railroad track.

10.




Cadillac Square, Detroit , Michigan, 1916.

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Ninth Street, Washington DC, 1915.

12.




I wouldn't want to walk across this street in a long dress.

13




Corner of Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street , New York , 1910.

14.




Broad Street north of Spruce Street , Philadelphia , 1905.

15.




View of Manhattan Bridge from Brooklyn in 1909.

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Fire at 55th Street , New York , 1915.

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Fifth Avenue, New York, 1913.

18.




Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 1907.

19.




The New York Public Library, New York , 1915.
Didn't realize they had 4-laners in those days.

20.




Wall Street, New York , 1911.
The 2 sidewalks together are as wide as the street in this pic.

21.




Fifth Avenue, New York, 1913.
Look at those top hats!

22.




Manhattan, 1907.

23.




The northern part of Fifth Avenue , New York , 1913.
Must have been something big going on. Look at the crowds and traffic jams.

24.




City Hall in New York .

25.




Dexter Avenue and the Capitol, Montgomery , Alabama , in 1906.
WoW! Really wide street. - 6-lane and it's practically empty.

26.




Valnut Street, Cincinnati , Ohio, 1910.

27.




Washington, DC, 1913.

28.




Broadway and the building of The Times, New York , 1915.
 

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The people wearing top hats in picture #23 was because it was the Easter parade in NYC. That's when you put on your fanciest clothing and women wore their Easter bonnets and walked up 5th ave in NYC. If you get the opportunity go watch "Easter Parade" with Fred Astair & Judy Garland.

Eric


 

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Relative to the picture of the NY Public Library on Fifth Ave and 42 Street, there was gun shop on the second floor of the building diagonally across from the library. I knew it througfh the 1950s. It was Stoeger's, billed as the world's largest gun store.
 

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Picture of the horses running on the RR track reminded me of the story of a fire horse, I believe in Indianapolis, that caught it's hoof in a RR track, and pulled it off.

Can't remember where I read the story, but I think it was the Indianapolis Star.

That horse was quite remarkable, as the story goes.

Maybe someone remembers this.
 

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Trolley track almost always in street installations uses what is called girder rail. There is a lip extending out from the top, just deep enough to let the wheel flange clear, but not so deep as to allow injuries to horses or people.





Railroad track that is placed in streets may be quite different. It still needs a guard, but often they are simply another rail turned on its side or an L beam spiked down, resulting in a wider and deeper space than trolley girder rail.

My guess is the horse did not get injured from a trolley rail, but in a commercial district where a railroad ran, like a warehouse or industrial area.
 

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Would be neat to show current day photos. I can provide Jacksonville Fl if anyone interested. Nice post Stu. Jake
 

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BTW, much of Wall Street still looks that way today. Same narrow street and wide sidewalks. most of the buildings are the same. I was there in 2012 and walked through the district after going to the 9-11 memorial.
 

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The Great Fire in SF really was a big deal, massive losses. Interesting read on Wiki on the statistic's, right up there with Katrina for cost of the loss in today's dollars, and people killed over 3,000. I always find looking at the old pix interesting, comparing them to what is there now, where they show just a block full of bricks and leveled buildings. There's little pockets of pix you'll find all over town that show the destruction, a lot of business's have their own little museum to make sure nobody forgets. Interesting that dynamit'g to build fire breaks by the Army led to most of the destruction, and then more fires. Funding of rebuilding effort contributed in part to a financial hickup of the US banking system, along with other factors. Interesting in comparing the days after the quake/fires to Katrina, things don't change much in 100 years in the US; shoot to kill looters, Army involved in relief efforts, tried to push the poorest folks out of town but they wouldn't stand for it. Sounds just like Katrina 100 years later.

You can open, then save this picture to your computer, then zoom in to see the block after block after block of nothing but rubble. The Ferry Building is still there, remodeled recently, and thousands of folks go thru there on the way to/from work every day, including me some days.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_San_Francisco_earthquake


 

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I was doing some logging railroad research yesterday, and while going through an old book of mine ("Logging Railroads of the West" by Kramer Adams) I came across destruction by the San Francisco earthquake out in the woods.

A long, very tall, wooden trestle of the Caspar, South Fork & Eastern Railway over Jug Hhandle Creek was turned into a pile of toothpicks by the quake. The trestle is just outside Caspar on the map at the link.

Caspar is about 160 miles north of San Francisco, so the quake hit an area well beyond its boundaries.
 

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Ladies used umbrellas as a fashion item and also to protect their skin. Back then, white skin was treasured.

Gene in Illinois
 

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Great seeing the old pic's from that time. Its a shame that there weren't any today pic's of the same spot.

I noticed the bouble decker bus in one pic.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone A Very Merry Christmas and A Most Excellent New Year...


I would also like to thank everyone who has commented on my threads and have told me how much they have enjoyed looking at them...


I have made a lot of new friends, this year and I am looking forward to making many more friends this up coming year...


Thanks,


Stu


Stu Gabriel (MrGun)
 

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I didn't even recognize Detroit without all the spray paint and gang sign on it.
 

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Looking at the top hats you will notice in all the pictures that none of the males are bareheaded. This was a time when hats were in.
 

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Did anyone notice the cigar ads on the sides of some of the buildings. Parking it appears was not an issue. Top hats and Derbies were in. Thanks for the photo's, very interesting. Side by side "new -vs- the old" photos from the same angle/areas would be interesting.
 
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