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For New Years we have some friends coming over and I want to smoke a 6 pound fresh ham and a 10 pound turkey. The electric smoker I have will allow you to set the temperature and time along with setting the smoker timer as well.

Smoker uses the small wooden biscuits with each biscuit burning for 20 minutes.

Here is what I need to know, what temperature and how long for the turkey and prep insturctions if you have any along with the same thing for the ham.

Smoker has racks so I can put the turkey and ham in separately.

Thanks for any info you can give me the guests will appreciate it.

Roger Edgington
 

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Roger if this is a Bradley, particularly a digital one, take a bit of time beforehand to check what temperature you really get. It depends a lot on the outside temperature, of course, but you might find it's a lot cooler or hotter than planned.

Once you find out how to get about 325 F. or so, it works like an oven. I find that hotter is better, since it dries the meat less.

Put a cheap aluminum roasting pan on the first "meat" shelf and fill half full of boiling water. If the temperature in the box is right, it will simmer/evaporate and give you a nice, not-too-dry product.

I use about a dozen pucks, practically a whole "flat," but I like a lot of smoke flavor!

Good luck; your guests will love it!

Neil
 

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Check this site out, it has lots of info for smoking turkey, I personally have never done a turkey, smoked lots of butts, briskets,beef clods , chickens, but never a turkey.....Good Luck..

http://www.smoked-meat.com/forum/showthread.php?t=25
 

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I brine the turkey first in water, salt, allspice and garlic. The slow cook at 225-250 degrees for 7-8 hours depending on size. Check with a meat thermometer. Do not over cook!
 

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Sounds like you have a Bradley smoker. I have one as well, and I used it to cook a 10 lb Turkey for Thanksgiving. I ran my smoker at 210 degrees F, and it took about 10 hours. It was pretty cold, though (about 10 degrees F) when I started, so the first hour was pretty much just ramping up to temperature. I placed a meat thermometer into the deepest part of the breast before I started and left it there for the duration. I smoked for the first 4 hours using apple wood biscuits. I covered the back end of the bird with aluminum foil for the last 3-4 hours to help keep in the moisture.

You should plan on getting the temperature on the meat thermometer to no less than 175 degrees. If the Turkey has a pop up timer, you can use that as a guide as well.

Immediately prior to putting the bird in the smoker, I covered it liberally with rub. I used "Fat Boy's" brand, but I think anything you like would work fine.

Make sure you have water in the bowl that catches the spent pucks. In addition to extinguishing the pucks, it also helps keep moisture in the cabinet.

The end result was wonderful. Hands down the best turkey I've ever ate. Very moist and flavorful.

Gary
 

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I have an identical smoker and its taken me about a dozen cooks to really get the feel of it. I suggest that you look on the internet for there are all kinds of smoking recipes. For poultry though usually "low and slow" until an internal temp of about 165 degrees is reached. I "wet smoke" everything like Neil suggested . However, I use a separate small tray filled with apple juice. I never go over 225 degrees though. Good luck.

blade819
 
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