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I'm shooting a 12-GA Model 12 in two overlapping trap leagues (16-YD singles) at the moment. This particular gun dates to 1953. It apparently started life as a field gun, but a previous owner tricked it out to shoot trap. It now sports a Simmons ventilated rib and trap wood - and the bolt and lifter have both been jeweled. It's a good shooter and fits me well.
Wood Air gun Hardwood Gun accessory Trigger

So, anyway - last night at the club - a fellow shooter came over to look my gun over and cautioned me to "be careful." He said that field guns weren't made to shoot thousands of rounds, the way trap guns were. The implication was that, since my gun started out as a field gun, it wasn't manufactured to be as robust as a trap gun and likely wouldn't hold up as well. That struck me as implausible, but he used the 870 TC as an example - he said that they are noticeably heavier that field-grade 870s.

I've been around a while and have never heard that line of thinking. I alsways assumed that a Winchester Model 12 field gun would have been manufactured to be every bit as solid and robust as a Model 12 trap gun.

Have I been wrong all these years?

TIA,

Tom
 

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The Technoid once stated that field guns are made to carry a lot and to shoot a little bit. Target guns are made to shoot a lot but carry a little bit.
 

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The model 12 was a well built gun. You might need a spring or two along the way, but I would not worry about it. Shoot it, keep it cleaned and lubed. Inspect the wear points every couple years. Try to wear it out. That is what it was made for. Depending on how old you are, the gun will still probably be running longer than you are.
 

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I'm shooting a 12-GA Model 12 in two overlapping trap leagues (16-YD singles) at the moment. This particular gun dates to 1953. It apparently started life as a field gun, but a previous owner tricked it out to shoot trap. It now sports a Simmons ventilated rib and trap wood - and the bolt and lifter have both been jeweled. It's a good shooter and fits me well.
View attachment 1784827
So, anyway - last night at the club - a fellow shooter came over to look my gun over and cautioned me to "be careful." He said that field guns weren't made to shoot thousands of rounds, the way trap guns were. The implication was that, since my gun started out as a field gun, it wasn't manufactured to be as robust as a trap gun and likely wouldn't hold up as well. That struck me as implausible, but he used the 870 TC as an example - he said that they are noticeably heavier that field-grade 870s.

I've been around a while and have never heard that line of thinking. I alsways assumed that a Winchester Model 12 field gun would have been manufactured to be every bit as solid and robust as a Model 12 trap gun.

Have I been wrong all these years?

TIA,

Tom
If we're talking 870's/MD12's/1100's/and such, your club guy is a fool. Magnum models had a few stouter areas.
 

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I'm shooting a 12-GA Model 12 in two overlapping trap leagues (16-YD singles) at the moment. This particular gun dates to 1953. It apparently started life as a field gun, but a previous owner tricked it out to shoot trap. It now sports a Simmons ventilated rib and trap wood - and the bolt and lifter have both been jeweled. It's a good shooter and fits me well.
View attachment 1784827
So, anyway - last night at the club - a fellow shooter came over to look my gun over and cautioned me to "be careful." He said that field guns weren't made to shoot thousands of rounds, the way trap guns were. The implication was that, since my gun started out as a field gun, it wasn't manufactured to be as robust as a trap gun and likely wouldn't hold up as well. That struck me as implausible, but he used the 870 TC as an example - he said that they are noticeably heavier that field-grade 870s.

I've been around a while and have never heard that line of thinking. I alsways assumed that a Winchester Model 12 field gun would have been manufactured to be every bit as solid and robust as a Model 12 trap gun.

Have I been wrong all these years?

TIA,
I have a friend that shoots a M12, he only has 84,000 singles and 71,000 handicap through the old junk Model 12 OH !!! by the way he has an average of 97 singles and a 95 handicap. Not to bad with a modified field gun. The gun is great just look at the prices for a 50-70 year old gun
shoot it and enjoy it, break all of them.
Tom
 

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Take the examples of some of the most popular trap/skeet vs field guns and how the parts interchange in the same gauge.
There are a few exceptions, Remington Special Field, Competition Trap 870 single shot models and Standard Weight 20 gauge models come to mind.
Accept that the trap guns may have a better fit/finish, better engraving and nicer wood in many cases.
To the best of my knowledge the guns below all have complete interchangeability of parts.
1. Remington 870, a couple of million have been made and I have 3 currently and all internal or external part will interchange.
2. Remington 1100, in gauge all the internal and external parts interchange that I know of, I have 4 and swap parts in them frequently.
3. Winchester Model 12, as far as I know all the parts will interchange as in your example.
4 Winchester Super X, great gun and as far as I know all variations parts will interchange in the same gauge size.
5. Beretta 390/391, basically anything can be swapped in the same gauge size. This goes from the few special runs through the trap/skeet/sporting clays to the field models.

There's obviously going to be a few examples of some guns that may have some heavy duty parts installed in the competition models but realistically it wouldn't make sense for any gun in mass production to have different mechanical specifications than base field models.
 

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I'm shooting a 12-GA Model 12 in two overlapping trap leagues (16-YD singles) at the moment. This particular gun dates to 1953. It apparently started life as a field gun, but a previous owner tricked it out to shoot trap. It now sports a Simmons ventilated rib and trap wood - and the bolt and lifter have both been jeweled. It's a good shooter and fits me well.
View attachment 1784827
So, anyway - last night at the club - a fellow shooter came over to look my gun over and cautioned me to "be careful." He said that field guns weren't made to shoot thousands of rounds, the way trap guns were. The implication was that, since my gun started out as a field gun, it wasn't manufactured to be as robust as a trap gun and likely wouldn't hold up as well. That struck me as implausible, but he used the 870 TC as an example - he said that they are noticeably heavier that field-grade 870s.

I've been around a while and have never heard that line of thinking. I alsways assumed that a Winchester Model 12 field gun would have been manufactured to be every bit as solid and robust as a Model 12 trap gun.

Have I been wrong all these years?

TIA,

Tom
Your friend is full of nonsense.
 

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Shoot it have a good time. It takes a hole heck of a lot of shells to wear one out.
The only shotguns I have see wore out are 1100’s and that was after many shells of heavy competition
 

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The Technoid once stated that field guns are made to carry a lot and to shoot a little bit. Target guns are made to shoot a lot but carry a little bit.
Weight .
Field gun = appox. 6 1/2 pounds
Target gun = appox 8 pounds
Which would you rather carry all day ?
Bet your fellow shooter also believes there is some beach front property in Vegas .
 

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Tom in Pittsburg,

Your fellow shooter should join TS so he can learn about shotguns, this site has the most firearm knowledge that you can't find anywhere else. Your Model 12 appears to have the early type Simmons dounut rib strut, those are the early (rarer) Simmons rib Winchester installed after 1955. Now as far as "robust" all Field and Trap model 12's had the "Take up ring" on the barrel extension so when the barrel loosen could take up the ring to the next notch and when you ran out of notches installed the next size "take up ring". Amazing so many TS member still shooting Model 12's that was designed by Thomas Johnson in 1912, just 110 years, now that's "robust".
 
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