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I need to ship a small package to Canada. Weighs less than 1 pound and has little value. Are there any special rules to obey? Would like to hear from someone who has actually done this. Thanks
 

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USPS.

If you ship via UPS, they use a brokerage house for customs and it can wind up costing you around $40 EXTRA dollars for your shipment.

Dunno about Fed Ex. Ask them.

I always used USPS to ship to Canada to avoid brokerage houses.
 

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For small packages I insist on USPS/Canada Post or I don't do business with the seller. Been screwed once by UPS...never again...and BTW I have sold to and bought gun stocks from US sellers/buyers and have always labelled the package "carved walnut". Never had a problem, but maybe I was just lucky.

Ron Burr
 

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More then you may want to know : )

RE: a gun part

Shipping Gun Parts to Canada

Question: I want to buy parts in the US for my firearm and import them into Canada.

Under USA regulations, suppliers in the United States need an export permit to permanently export firearms and firearm parts to Canada. To get an export permit, they need to include a Canadian import document with their application. It is up to you or your import agent to obtain such a document from the Government of Canada and give it to your supplier.

Your supplier does not require a Canadian import document for muzzle-loading firearms, antique firearms, pellet guns or BB guns. Neither do they require one for shipments of firearm parts (other than frames, barrels, cylinders, receivers, and complete breech mechanisms) with a total wholesale value of less than $100 US. (Update: $500 value, not all businesses have increased).

It should be noted that there is no equivalent exemption offered by the Department of Commerce for shotgun parts. Further, there is no exemption for ammunition or ammunition components.

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Borderview Posting. As of July 2013, the previous “$100 limit” has been raised to $500 USD” for Canada only.

United States law (specifically the “ITAR” – International Traffic in Arms Regulations”) allows for the export without an export license of certain firearm-related parts and components. This guide provides some details about the so-called “small parts exemption.” Here are the basics:

•Does not apply to any parts/components related to Shotguns (these are regulated by the U.S. Department of Commerce rather than the U.S. Department of State, and there is not equivalent exemption for shotgun parts in the Export Administration Regulations).

•Does not apply to ammunition-related parts and components. These are classified as “Category III on the U.S. Munitions List, while the exemption only refers to “Category I(a) firearms.”

•Does not apply to “Significant Military Equipment,” which includes any firearm itself.

•Also does not apply to barrels, cylinders, frames (receivers), or complete breach mechanisms.

•Exemption can only be used and claimed by a DDTC Registered Exporter (not just any business, nor a foreign individual traveling in the US).

•As the Registered Exporter, we must still file documentation online (using the Automated Export System, or AES) to notify the government that we’re using this exemption, including the item description, tariff code, value, weight, date of export and Port of Exit.

•By law, orders cannot be broken up into smaller shipments to meet the $100/500 threshold.

•It is defined in the law as $100 ($500 for Canada) “wholesale” value, so in limited cases we may export something that retails for slightly more than $100/$500 USD if our wholesale cost is less than the applicable amount
 

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Import ans export duties might be wrapped into your package. Ran into this getting a stock recarved. I have another to do, but shipping expenses make the deal seen less than worthwhile!.....merlyn
 

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The moral of the story is the risk isn't worth the reward. Yea, there's a 99% chance it will make it though without issue. But within that 1% remaining, there's a 100% chance of a huge pain in the ass if you get caught.
 
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