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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is the way the trap will run in Tokyo.
6 per squad. Men and women in separate events. You must stay on your pad which is 1 metre square until the shooter on your right has shot. Then you can move. The shooter may load and move except going from 5 to 6 (the waiting pad before #1). Gun must be empty and open as you walk.
Each shooter gets the same 25 targets in random order. 2 lefts 2 rights and a straightaway from each lane.
All targets are 76 metres. Heights vary from 1.4 to 3 metres at 10 metres. Angles are up to 45 degrees. Straightaways can be up to 10 degrees off centre.
The program is announced before competition on each layout. Typically 3 will be used. There are about 10 programs that determine how each of the 15 machines is set- eg, 30 degrees left 2.2 metres. The machines do not oscillate.
The clays are 110mm, 2mm wider than ATA targets. They are flatter in the dome and harder, to survive being thrown at 60-70 mph.
The shooter has 12 seconds to call. That time is set from when the result of the previous shooters target is known.
No call for a hit. Hooter for a loss. 2 line judges will confirm the central referees call.
Each shooter has one challenge. Video will be used in such a case. A successful challenge means the shooter retains a challenge.
75 targets first day, one round on each layout. 50 on the second.
2 shots per target allowed. Most guns will be 30 or 32 inch, 1600 or less barrels, low rib. No penalty for second barrel.
Ammo is 24 gram 7 1/2 usually at 1300-1400 FPS.
The top 6 go into the final. Q position will determine who remains in the final in the event of a tie. This is why finalists on the same Q score will shoot off, even if they’re already in the final. Shoot offs and the finals are single barrel.
One shooter is eliminated after 25 targets in the final, then again at 30, 35 and 40. The last two shoot 50. Only in the event of a tie for the last 2 is there a further shoot off.
 

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This is the way the trap will run in Tokyo.
6 per squad. Men and women in separate events. You must stay on your pad which is 1 metre square until the shooter on your right has shot. Then you can move. The shooter may load and move except going from 5 to 6 (the waiting pad before #1). Gun must be empty and open as you walk.
Each shooter gets the same 25 targets in random order. 2 lefts 2 rights and a straightaway from each lane.
All targets are 76 metres. Heights vary from 1.4 to 3 metres at 10 metres. Angles are up to 45 degrees. Straightaways can be up to 10 degrees off centre.
The program is announced before competition on each layout. Typically 3 will be used. There are about 10 programs that determine how each of the 15 machines is set- eg, 30 degrees left 2.2 metres. The machines do not oscillate.
The clays are 110mm, 2mm wider than ATA targets. They are flatter in the dome and harder, to survive being thrown at 60-70 mph.
The shooter has 12 seconds to call. That time is set from when the result of the previous shooters target is known.
No call for a hit. Hooter for a loss. 2 line judges will confirm the central referees call.
Each shooter has one challenge. Video will be used in such a case. A successful challenge means the shooter retains a challenge.
75 targets first day, one round on each layout. 50 on the second.
2 shots per target allowed. Most guns will be 30 or 32 inch, 1600 or less barrels, low rib. No penalty for second barrel.
Ammo is 24 gram 7 1/2 usually at 1300-1400 FPS.
The top 6 go into the final. Q position will determine who remains in the final in the event of a tie. This is why finalists on the same Q score will shoot off, even if they’re already in the final. Shoot offs and the finals are single barrel.
One shooter is eliminated after 25 targets in the final, then again at 30, 35 and 40. The last two shoot 50. Only in the event of a tie for the last 2 is there a further shoot off.
Pretty good description of the event.
 

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One additional point about the Finals. Shooters are assigned a bib number from 1-6. 1 is high shooter from the qualification rounds/125 targets. As mentioned, shooters with same scores in top 6/Finals will shoot off (miss and out) for the higher bib number. If after 25 targets 2 shooters have the same number of hits, the lower bib number is out; i.e., no miss and out to continue. This process is used until the top 2 shooters remain with 10 targets to go of the second 25 target round. This has spawned a new term in the sport. If you are the low shooter of the 2 and are out, you were ‘bibbed’.
V/r
Maxey
 

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Perazzi MX2000 34” unsingle 0.031/34” Wilkinson o/u with a prosoft
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Has any Olympian ever gone on to shoot ATA trap??
Derek Mein shoots NSCA and ATA.

Kim Rhode also shot ATA on rare occasions.

Stafford shot Olympic. But shot ATA first, which is pretty common, like with Corey Cogdell, Josh Richmond, Frank Pascoe, etc.
 

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Has any Olympian ever gone on to shoot ATA trap??
I believe Paul Shaw

Biography
Paul Shaw will be making his fifth Pan Am Games appearance at TORONTO 2015. It will be the fourth major Games at which he will compete alongside son Drew, following Guadalajara 2011 and the 2010 and 2014 Commonwealth Games. The elder Shaw has won three medals at the Pan Am Games: silver in team trap and bronze in individual trap at Indianapolis 1987 as well as silver in team trap at Mar del Plata 1995. He had a dream come true in 1996 when he competed at the Olympic Games in Atlanta. Shaw made his ISSF World Championship debut in 1994 when he achieved a career-best placement of fifth in the double trap. In his nearly-three decade international career, Shaw’s career-high ISSF World Cup result in the double trap is seventh, achieved in 1993 in Los Angeles
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Has any Olympian ever gone on to shoot ATA trap??
Down here it's usually the other way around.

However Michael Diamond, Russell Mark and Deserie Baynes (Wakefield) have won Olympic medals and are or were notable trap shooters in our version of the event.

Other Olympians who now shoot trap as well include Craig Henwood, John Maxwell, current Olympian Penny Smith and my fiancee Lisa Smith. I'm sure there are others.
 
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