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Nobel Sport 688 followed by Cheddite?

3885 Views 19 Replies 14 Participants Last post by  Pull & Mark
I’ve heard both of these are larger than Winchester 209s. However, anyone have any problems using Cheddites in hulls previously loaded with Nobel Sport 688s?
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I’ve heard both of these are larger than Winchester 209s. However, anyone have any problems using Cheddites in hulls previously loaded with Nobel Sport 688s?


You are hearing wrong on the size. The Chedditie's and Winchester's can be interchanged. I believe the Nobel and Fiochi primers can be interchanged but am not completely sure of that.
 

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All you have to do is de-prime 5 of your hulls. Then with your fingers push the Cheddite primer into the pocket and see how far up the hole you can push it.

Now take a brand new once fired Win. AA hull. Try pushing a Win. primer into the primer pocket and see how far up you can push the primer. Now you'll have your answer.

If you can push the Cheddite primer 80% of the way up the hole easily? Then you run a high risk of the powders explosive gases passing around the primer and onto your breech face. This can cause more carbon to build up in your receiver. If you clean the inside of your own receivers? You can simply just clean it more often. If you pay someone else to do this work for you? Well you may not want to use those Cheddite primers? Good Luck to Ya. break em all jeff
 

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I’ve heard both of these are larger than Winchester 209s. However, anyone have any problems using Cheddites in hulls previously loaded with Nobel Sport 688s?
Cheddite CX2000 primers are only .001 larger in diameter than Winchester 209's, While Nobel and Fiochhi primers are ..005 - .006 inch larger than the Win 209. You can go back and forth between Wincheter and Cheddite's, but either of them will fall out of a hull previously primed with Nobel or Fiochhi..
 

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Here are the primer dimensions.
Chart was accurate when first posted but that was 20 years ago. Manufacturing changes have occurred that make it inaccurate today. Most overseas manufacturers acquiesced to American demands and sized closer to our 209 standard. Not all, but some.
 

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Cheddite primers will not be a tight fit in hulls previously loaded with Noble Sport 688 primers. They "may" not fall out but will subject your receiver face to blow-back leakage around the primer. I am speaking from recent personal experience using both primer's.
 

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A micrometer is your friend
Absolutely agree. Use a micrometer and learn how to measure with it.

I've seen a lot of folks (on this site and others) talking about and showing measurements made with low quality Chinese dial calipers and calling them micrometers. They ain't the same thing, folks. The number produced by these measurements is just that, a number. Absolute accuracy isn't guaranteed. Are they pretty good? Perhaps. Exactly how good or bad? That all depends.

If you want to compare diameters of one primer on your bench with that of another, you can do it with almost any instrument and get an idea of the deltas - but I'd still go with a real micrometer, and preferably one that's capable of 4 digits of precision (a tenth of a thousandth). If you want to produce a chart of real measurements you need calibration standards to validate and provide offsets to the measurements provided by your instruments. If you don't, it's just a table of arbitrary numbers.
 

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Absolutely agree. Use a micrometer and learn how to measure with it.

I've seen a lot of folks (on this site and others) talking about and showing measurements made with low quality Chinese dial calipers and calling them micrometers. They ain't the same thing, folks. The number produced by these measurements is just that, a number. Absolute accuracy isn't guaranteed. Are they pretty good? Perhaps. Exactly how good or bad? That all depends.

If you want to compare diameters of one primer on your bench with that of another, you can do it with almost any instrument and get an idea of the deltas - but I'd still go with a real micrometer, and preferably one that's capable of 4 digits of precision (a tenth of a thousandth). If you want to produce a chart of real measurements you need calibration standards to validate and provide offsets to the measurements provided by your instruments. If you don't, it's just a table of arbitrary numbers.
I’ve got Starrett tools in their wooden precision fit cases in the cabinet area. But I haven’t needed or used them for coming on 25 years now. A “cheap” Chinese made digital caliper and a short section of drill rod as a “standard” is all I’ve really needed lately. It’s just too easy going from a 4 digit past the decimal precision to a decimal is good enough sloppy fit in hacking out something that works. Most of the time.
 
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Horses for courses. When you need accuracy, you need it. When the need is to do something without that degree of precision, 'good enough' is just that. As my dad used to say about fabricating things on a destroyer in WW-II, "Pound to shape, file to fit, paint to match". Getting it done is what counts.

BTW the old Starrett mill factory in Athol, MA isn't far from here. Been on a tour there a time or two when they were still making dial indicators there. My collection of Starrett tools are mostly acquired from the flea markets where the old machinist's beloved tools ended up when they shuffled off this mortal coil. Quality stuff that will last longer than I.
 

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Use a live 243 round for a plug gauge. If it goes into the hole all the way up to the brass, your hole is oversize.
For Winchester size primers the bullet will stop about 1/8 - 3/16 short of the brass. Don't ask how I found this one.

HM
 

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Horses for courses. When you need accuracy, you need it. When the need is to do something without that degree of precision, 'good enough' is just that. As my dad used to say about fabricating things on a destroyer in WW-II, "Pound to shape, file to fit, paint to match". Getting it done is what counts.

BTW the old Starrett mill factory in Athol, MA isn't far from here. Been on a tour there a time or two when they were still making dial indicators there. My collection of Starrett tools are mostly acquired from the flea markets where the old machinist's beloved tools ended up when they shuffled off this mortal coil. Quality stuff that will last longer than I.
"Measured with a micrometer, marked with chalk, and cut with an ax."
 
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No micrometer needed. Use a live 243 round as a plug gauge. If it goes in up to the brass you need big primers or you should toss the hull. found this out after acquiring a huge batch of Gold medals with stretched pockets years ago.

Works for me.

HM
 

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I have all three primers in front of me cheddites, Nobel sport 688 and Winchester's all measure .243 at the back end where they lock in to the base. The Winchester's have more taper towards the front. All three fit tight into a shell previously primed with a Nobel sport 688
 

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Its pretty simple. I had a gentleman give me some older, but still useable 20 ga. STS hulls this past winter. I wanted to load them for a buddy who was low on ammo. I did not want him using my current STS supply of hulls which were all new. The problem was the hulls had been loaded many times with Cheddite primers. I use only Win. primers. I de-primed 5 hulls. Then by hand I tried to push up 5 new Win. primers into each of the empty hulls. All were nice and tight. I could not even get them to go up not 1/4 of the way by hand!!! There were no gas leaks after firing them as well. I loaded them twice for him and then he tossed them and headed back up north for the summer. If the primer only gets tight 3/4 of the way up the pocket. You will get gas leaks around the primer during firing. This will cause your receiver to build up carbon inside at a much faster rate. No need to measure everything with fancy tools. Just use some common sense. If you can get the primer halfway up? You may, Or may not get gas leaks? Just because you can get your primers to stay in the hull. Does not mean that they will not leak lots of gases from around the primer during firing. Not the best thing for your shotgun. But I will let you decide if its worth it to you. Since primers are almost impossible to find right now. Good Luck and don't forget to break em all jeff
 
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