Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When finishing a new wood gun stock, after sanding smooth, do you stain before filling pores with wet sanding birchwood casey tru oil and sawdust, or fill the pores first with wet sanding?
Thanks for your help. Long time shooter but novice stock finisher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
A old wood workers tip, I used ice cold water on a cloth, rub on stock/forearm helps raise the grain, allow to dry. Best method is fill pores with wet sanding then a few strokes with 0000 steel wool. I always stain by wood with Danish Oil, rub on lightly then wipe off and ran a coat hanger thru the stock and hung it up for 24 hours. Then light strokes of 0000 steel wool before next application to obtain desired color. You don't need slap too much Tru oil just apply with cloth and wipe off allow to dry 24 hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
Did. Your stock have the OLD FINISH removed......OR.... is a brand new piece
Of wood ?
If totally new.....stain now (if needed) and start wet sanding with Tru Oil to fill
Any pores.....many coats are required.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,661 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
A old wood workers tip, I used ice cold water on a cloth, rub on stock/forearm helps raise the grain, allow to dry. Best method is fill pores with wet sanding then a few strokes with 0000 steel wool. I always stain by wood with Danish Oil, rub on lightly then wipe off and ran a coat hanger thru the stock and hung it up for 24 hours. Then light strokes of 0000 steel wool before next application to obtain desired color. You don't need slap too much Tru oil just apply with cloth and wipe off allow to dry 24 hours.
Thanks for the good info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
This is the wood with water on it, in its rough form.
PRETTY WOOD; Now I see lots of open pores to fill. How fine sand paper will you be using for final sanding ? Maybe try extra fine or 200 grit plus to eliminate pores. When I was refinishing Model 12 stocks for John Durkin @ Winchester Custom shop I used Herters "Red" stain that had filler in the stain, left beautiful color tone. I think Brownell's carries it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
375 Posts
I find it difficult to both stain and fill pores using Tru-oil. You have to be careful not to sand through the stain while removing the excess finish from the pore filling operation. Unless I had a mis match between the forearm and the stock I would not stain. But I may have weird tastes in wood. I like wild grain and gaudy color contrast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
I would DEFINITELY NOT Stain that stock!!!
I cut Tru Oil with a little Japan Dryer. Start with 400 wet/dry sand paper.....
eventually go to 600 until ALL pores are filled.....then coat after coat of Tru Oil
applied as thinly as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
793 Posts
I would DEFINITELY NOT Stain that stock!!!
I cut Tru Oil with a little Japan Dryer. Start with 400 wet/dry sand paper.....
eventually go to 600 until ALL pores are filled.....then coat after coat of Tru Oil
applied as thinly as possible.
Stain could and should bring out more hidden color and gain in the wood. O.P. can test a area with a Q-Tip like I used to do after it dried if pleasing stained the whole stock but apply small amounts as don't soak it on first coat. Apply and use cloth to remove excess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
By the photo, it looks like there is some sculpting left to do. If so, finish that completely before doing anything so final finishing results will be uniform.

I recently redid a Winchester 67A Boys Rifle that had close to 60 years of use. I took what little finish it had back to raw wood. It was a very open grained cheap grade of Walnut that you would expect for a rifle that retailed for around $10 in the early 60's. I wanted to "try" and produce a color that was closer to Maple. I used two coats of Maple stain, sanding with 600 grit between coats. The stain fuzzed up the grain some, but I still wanted to fill up some of the pores before final finish as I had the color where I wanted. I hit it with two light coats of lacquer sanding sealer using steel wool after it dried. Once satisfied there I used several coats of OTC tung oil. Pretty happy the way it came out considering it was a very cheap grade of wood. Photo attached. I also attached a photo of a Model 70 I have with a custom Maple stock that I was trying to emulate.

The other two photos are of a 25-06 my Dad built before there was a commercial one available. I was a kid but still remember when that stock was being finished. His best friend was a stock maker/gunsmith and he used a tung oil blend that he made himself. Of course, this wood was much tighter and I don't think he did a lot of prep work. I remember he applied the oil with his fingers and wiped with a lint free cloth. He had a little closet that he used to dry it in between coats. I seem to remember him saying that he kept the humidity low in it (no idea how). Anyway, in the several stocks I have done over the years I followed his method of applying oil using my hands and wiping with a cotton cloth after. It might take a few more coats that way, but I think it's worth it.

Boys Rifle 2.jpg 270 Model 70 2.jpg 101_6629.JPG 101_6630.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Thank you. That Zebra Maple stock is one of my favorites and the only Maple stocked rifle I own. It is a pre-64 Win. 70 in 270. My Dad cut the factory stock for me to shoot when I was about 11 so it would fit me better. I grew into this one when I was about 13 after a huge growth spurt. I still have the shortened one and it will go to my youngest Grandson when his Dad thinks he is ready.

I had not shot it for better than 20 years until recently and in its present form is not a great shooter. I will probably play with it a bit and see where the accuracy issue might be coming from. I think the stock may be pinching on one side of the barrel or maybe the receiver. If so, that is a fairly easy fix. I have tried a few loads that shoot great out of my Ruger #1 .270, but each rifle seems to have their own favorite powders/bullets/velocity. The receiver bedding seems to be okay, but it was done over 50 years ago. :D

Here is a better photo of the Boys rilfe I re-did. I guess you can't get a Maple look unless it is actually Maple.
Boys Rifle 1.jpg
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top