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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help... I own several firearms (pistols/rifles) and shoot often but for the first time, I picked up a rented shotgun for some trap shooting off a Groupon discount and got the bug after a 30-40 percent hit rate 1st time out. Ideally, I want to learn to hunt but because I live in Southern California, I almost feel like I would be at the shotgun range shooting Trap or Skeet 75-90 percent of the time practicing and/or just to have fun, much more than I would be hunting.

So based on this, what type of shotgun do I buy? Ideally, it would be nice to get one that I could shoot all three with. BTW, when I say hunt, I mean highland birds, not waterfowl.

Currently I have had my eye on Browning, specifically the Citori 725 Sporting w/or w/o Adjustable Comb, and the 725 Field; I really like the mechanical firing system of the Citori 725. I was at one time looking at the Browning BT-99 but now I feel that is to Trap Specific, not versatile enough, and an over/under makes the most sense.

Any recommendations would be much appreciated.... LisaNicole
 

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Welcome to ts.com, Im sure you will get quite a few replies to your thread. The Browning 725 sporting with the adjustable comb is a nice shotgun, my dad has a 725 trap combo and the O/U is the 30" Bl. version. I have shot it a fair amount and it handles well.There are a couple of shooters at my local club who have the sporting version and like them quite well with no issues so far. My dad did switch from the factory chokes to Carlson's extended with positive results.
 

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Browning 725 is a great choice. I would go for sporting version (vs. field), you will be able to shoot anything with it - trap, skeet, sporting clays, etc. Another comparable gun to look at is Beretta Silver Pigeon 1. But... get the one that fits you best. Good luck!
 

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I have found memories of Prado. Shot there many times. Once won a really nice Buckle there. Sounds like your idea on the Browning is right on.....nice thing about So.Cal is if you get hooked and are competitive, you can shoot ATA targets every weekend and not drive too far to do it.

You can have alotta fun and meet some great people. Hope you stick with it....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I appreciate all the feed back... So, If I decide to hunt with a Sporting Clay gun, what is the negative by doing that? Weight/barrel length, or something else? Are Sporting gungs considered too nice to take out in the field where they might get banged around? Very curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have found memories of Prado. Shot there many times. Once won a really nice Buckle there. Sounds like your idea on the Browning is right on.....nice thing about So.Cal is if you get hooked and are competitive, you can shoot ATA targets every weekend and not drive too far to do it.

You can have alotta fun and meet some great people. Hope you stick with it....
Thanks, I live just a short 10 min drive from Prado so it is convenient. I got to join on my second roud of trap with some experienced trappers who were very generous with shooting advice. I think they didn't believe it was my first time. lol
 

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I do not think you would be at any real disadvantage to hunt with the 725 sporting.As with any shotgun used in the field it will show cosmetic wear and tear and if you are in elements/rain ect. you will definitely have to do all the proper maitinence. I know quite a few shooters who use their sporting models to hunt.
 

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Thanks, I live just a short 10 min drive from Prado so it is convenient. I got to join on my second roud of trap with some experienced trappers who were very generous with shooting advice. I think they didn't believe it was my first time. lol
Then your not far from Redlands....you'll like it there even MORE....
 

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+1 for the 725 Sporting with adjustable comb.

I've been shooting a field model for sporting clays for the past year, and it's a great gun. The only problem I have with the sporting model is the slightly longer length of pull (14 3/4"). I shoot sporting clays gun down, and the field model seems smoother to mount (at least for me). And I don't like the hi viz front bead on the sporting.

I am also new to trapshooting, and I just bought a BT-99 golden clays. Great trap gun, but it won't do the job if you plan to shoot sporting clays and skeet. The 725 sporting would make a good all-around clay shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I do not think you would be at any real disadvantage to hunt with the 725 sporting.As with any shotgun used in the field it will show cosmetic wear and tear and if you are in elements/rain ect. you will definitely have to do all the proper maitinence. I know quite a few shooters who use their sporting models to hunt.
That is sort of what I was imagining. After all, isn't Sporting just like hunting only with clay and not walking around on/in who knows what and in possible weather? The shooting I thought is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
+1 for the 725 Sporting with adjustable comb.

I've been shooting a field model for sporting clays for the past year, and it's a great gun. The only problem I have with the sporting model is the slightly longer length of pull (14 3/4"). I shoot sporting clays gun down, and the field model seems smoother to mount (at least for me). And I don't like the hi viz front bead on the sporting.

I am also new to trapshooting, and I just bought a BT-99 golden clays. Great trap gun, but it won't do the job if you plan to shoot sporting clays and skeet. The 725 sporting would make a good all-around clay shooter.
thanks, this is very helpful. have you tried just trap with your Field? would the Sportying be a better compromise for all shooting?
 

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I agree, my shotguns weather for trap or sporting are shooters and I use them a lot. I take care of them and service them and definitely do not abuse them but they are out in all the weather esp. here in MT.
 

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Dear Lisa

Welcome to the forum. Since you are a girl, you likely are not built like a guy. Your hands are likely smaller, arms a little shorter, higher cheekbones, etc. Getting a gun made for an average sized guy might not work for you. If you shorten the stock on a standard gun, you still have a gun that does not fit, and is worth a lot less on a sale or trade.

Not trying to empty your pocketbook, but you might look at the Syren shotguns. They are set up for women. Shorter length-to-grip (smaller hands, remember?), shorter LOP (stock length), higher comb for a petite face and higher cheekbones, and such. They put these stocks on gas autos and O/U's.

The only catch of hunting with a Sporting gun is a little extra length and weight. Other than that, they are much better than a field gun for harvesting game.

Shotguns for Women - Syren USA
 

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Dear Lisa

Welcome to the forum. Since you are a girl, you likely are not built like a guy. Your hands are likely smaller, arms a little shorter, higher cheekbones, etc. Getting a gun made for an average sized guy might not work for you. If you shorten the stock on a standard gun, you still have a gun that does not fit, and is worth a lot less on a sale or trade.

Not trying to empty your pocketbook, but you might look at the Syren shotguns. They are set up for women. Shorter length-to-grip (smaller hands, remember?), shorter LOP (stock length), higher comb for a petite face and higher cheekbones, and such. They put these stocks on gas autos and O/U's.

The only catch of hunting with a Sporting gun is a little extra length and weight. Other than that, they are much better than a field gun for harvesting game.

Shotguns for Women - Syren USA
The Syren is what my wife ended up with and she really likes it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I agree, my shotguns weather for trap or sporting are shooters and I use them a lot. I take care of them and service them and definitely do not abuse them but they are out in all the weather esp. here in MT.
Well I guess the real question is if having ported barrel, and an adjustable Comb with the next higher grade of wood that is available with the Sporting model is either worth the extra $1000 or something I might end up wishing I had when nit hunting and shooting clays either in sport, trap, of skeet. Unlikely it would ever see much of the weather that you experience. And yes, taking proper care (cleaning & lubrication) of any firearm is mandatory in my mind any time it is taken out side.
 

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I feel the adjustable comb is very important/porting not so much/up-grade wood is nice but will not make it shoot better :) You an always have a adjustable comb installed on the sporter of your choice if it does not have one and you can get up-grade hardware such as gracoil ect. I will be doing the very same thing to a Browning Citori 30" Bl. field model soon. I was blessed with finding a basically new in case(sat in a safe since 1989)Citori and will put a adj. comb on it and that is about it. It will make a nice hunter and sporting shotgun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dear Lisa

Welcome to the forum. Since you are a girl, you likely are not built like a guy. Your hands are likely smaller, arms a little shorter, higher cheekbones, etc. Getting a gun made for an average sized guy might not work for you. If you shorten the stock on a standard gun, you still have a gun that does not fit, and is worth a lot less on a sale or trade.

Not trying to empty your pocketbook, but you might look at the Syren shotguns. They are set up for women. Shorter length-to-grip (smaller hands, remember?), shorter LOP (stock length), higher comb for a petite face and higher cheekbones, and such. They put these stocks on gas autos and O/U's.

The only catch of hunting with a Sporting gun is a little extra length and weight. Other than that, they are much better than a field gun for harvesting game.

Shotguns for Women - Syren USA
I appreciate that. Actually, I am about 5-11 and have a pretty strong upper body from other sports, mostly swimming, and have no problems with common sized stocks. Yes, my higher cheek bone is perhaps the only thing that was left sore after shooting a rented 12 gauge with a composite stock, thankfully not visibly bruised; not sure how to get around that and wonder if the Adjustable Comb on the Sporting model, which the Field doesn't have, would help. Additional thoughts? I will definitely suggest the Syren to a friend of mine I shot with who is 5'-0" and struggled with a standard size 20 gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I feel the adjustable comb is very important/porting not so much/up-grade wood is nice but will not make it shoot better :) You an always have a adjustable comb installed on the sporter of your choice if it does not have one and you can get up-grade hardware such as gracoil ect. I will be doing the very same thing to a Browning Citori 30" Bl. field model soon. I was blessed with finding a basically new in case(sat in a safe since 1989)Citori and will put a adj. comb on it and that is about it. It will make a nice hunter and sporting shotgun.
Good to know. I can definitely investigate that with Browning or Gunsmith. I didn't know you can add on or modify a factory stock in that way. I thought you would have to install a new aftermarket of custom stock. Sometimes that can backfire, no pun intended, and alter the characteristics of a firearm negatively if not done right.
 
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