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Been shooting pistol rifle regularly for about the past five years. I was reduced to shooting when I was young. Just came across this site researching about shooting shotguns. Done a lot of talking, research and some shopping. There is a local club here that I will will likely go to for more education and for training.

1) As far as gun selection. I still don't know much yet but I do like the Remington 1100. I also like classic firearms like a Winchester model 12 and model 21 styles.
2) I have a lot of 12 gage 2-3/4, 1-1/8 oz, 9 shot and some 20 gage.

So if anyone has any wisdom or thoughts I would appreciate any thoughts you may have.

Thx, DZ
 

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First comment, shooting a pistol/rifle and a shotgun are TOTALLY DIFFERENT.

You DO NOT AIM when shooting a shotgun at clay targets. Some pistol/rifle shooters that I have worked with really struggled with this concept.

As far as a gun for a guy just getting into clay target sports, an 1100 is a good choice. IMO, you should make sure you get one that has interchangeable chokes rather than fixed chokes since you will more than likely be trying several different types of clays shooting.

Also, I would suggest a barrel length of no less than 28".

Good Luck and Good Shooting!
 

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1100s are great guns to start out with. They are light on recoil and parts are easy to come by.

The biggest thing is to just get out and shoot. Listen to the old guys Bs after shoots and make friends. Offer to help out around the club and you'll fit right in.

As far as loads go, 1oz 1180 to 1200 fps are great for trap. I personally don't like shooting anything faster than 1200 fps for 16 yard line. Look for #8 shot or #7.5 shot. 9s might not legal in some shoots.

Also get yourself a decent pair of safety glasses. If you can't see the bird, you can't shoot it. Also shoot with both eyes open. Takes some getting used to, but it will be nice in the long-run.

Another helpful tool is a rangebag. You can keep all your stuff together, such as shells, hearing protection, choke tubes, and snacks/beverages.

And as mentioned above, POINT the gun. Loom at the bird and bring your gun up to it and shoot it. After you shoot a few hundred rounds, you might get the hang of it. Takes some people a long time, and others not so long. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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I made the change your investigating about a year and a half ago. The Remington 1100 is a good gun to start. I like 7.5 shot, others like 8.

Shooters are universally friendly. Let it be known that you're just starting out and their will always be someone to give you some advice, instruction, and help you get acquainted with the clay sports. Where I shoot the range officers are happy to help new shooters. You will find that there will be a big difference from shooting pistols/rifles.

Try the different clay sports to see what you like. As you settle on one, sign up for a lesson or two to kick start you progress. Have fun!
 

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Welcome to the trap shooting addiction. The 1100 is a good choice, they handle decently and the recoil is mild. I still have the one I used from many years ago. Welcome to the forum from sw PA.
 

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I would try to find a club that has a selection of loaners for you to try out. It is very addicting and extremely satisfying watching clay turn to dust. Find a gun that fits you, or that can be fitted to you, and get as much lead downrange. Just remember the they are moving targets, so as mentioned above, don't aim. If you get a chance to join a clinic or get some instruction, private or just pointers from the guys at the range, I would recommend it. I've found that most people at the clay busting range are friendly and happy to help you effectively throw lead downrange.
 

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Shoot it before you buy it. That way you can find a gun that is user friendly. HMB
This is probably the best advice you will receive. Go to a major event like the Grand where you the manufacturers will let you shoot different styles of guns free of charge. Most of the vendors at these events will let you shoot a used gun. This should help you get an idea of what you like best. Also, be sure to seek out someone who can explain the concept of proper gun fit. It is important.
 

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Welcome to the board and to these WONDERFUL sports of shooting at moving targets.
(Yeah, plural).

I am also a beginner and my beginner experiences are still quite fresh.
Not wishing to stir up the pot about this being a TRAP shooting forum, but at this point I am finding that variety seems to be improving my general shot gun shooting skills.

For TRAP the first thing I noticed was that everyone stands on the line, calls for their birds, fires their shots, rotates their positions and after 25 shots each its all over.
That is all very well, it is the way the game is played - shut up and shoot.
Someone MIGHT give you a tip at the end of the round.

In contrast because skeet is played very differently, i.e. at each station one shooter at a time, there seems to be a lot more conversation and "tip giving".
It "works for me" for someone to quietly say "you shot over both of those" as I leave the station. The shots are still fresh in my mind, so the feedback helps my learning.
My biggest problem was leads, 4 ft from station 4 being the hardest until someone spoke up just before I shot one time. Approximately;
"The trap house is just about 8 ft wide, your lead needs to be half that, look at the trap house just before you shoot."
I almost fell over laughing when I got both of them immediately after that.

I'm going to suggest that you don't try 5 stand for a while, I did - enuf said.
 

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Well, your choice (liking ) of Guns is all over the place . I guess : Remington 1100 > over 1 million made in about 50 different ways ( stocks,finish ,Guage ,barrel lenght etc. ) .Mdl12 is nice & a lot of people had great scores with them . Win 21 high $$ has not been around as long as the Mdl. 12 and you do not see many on a Trapfield .It all depends what you want to shoot . Best thing is, try somebodys gun first and understand the gun you will buy is very likely not the last one . I started this "crazy STUFF " about 40 some years ago with a $ 85.oo Pumpgun , graduated to a Rem. 3200 ,about $ 380.oo then ( I guess ) . Over the years stopped shooting ,restarted again and now have way more $$$ in guns then I should have and shoot a bit of everything ,but I'm lucky since I have about 12 Gun clubs withhin 1 h driving from my house . Read all of the above posts ,again ,because that is all good advice .
 

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Welcome.

Keep your eyes on the target and shoot when the gun goes through the thing you are looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you one and all!!! It all sounds like great imput and advice. I knew step-by-step process I will take one step at a time. Thank you again!! DZ
 

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Welcome. The Remington 1100 is a great gun to start with. 1oz 7.5 or 8's are great. IMO you don't need anything faster than 1200fps.
 

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An 1100 is a great gun to start with ...reasonably priced, soft shooting, and breaks targets. Always remember to have fun while your breaking or not breaking targets!
 
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