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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at getting into the progressive reloader game and would like to know if they will load a 1 1/4 or 1 3/8 load just as easy as they do with the lighter weight loads? Single stage mec is starting to take too much time. Thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes lead, but do the progressive reloaders seem to have any problems loading the heavier loads or not was my question. Sorry for the confusion
 

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I've used a MEC 1-1/4 oz. shot bar in my Grabber for years to make hunting and practice "Flyer" loads...NO issues whatsoever.
 

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With the proper shot bushing or bar, the loader won't know the difference between 1-1/8oz. or 1-1/2oz.
 

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While my experience is Hornady... no issues with large or small... just test run a few until you get the crimp you want...

Regards all,
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I've been reloading with a mec jr for a while now but keeping my options open to any brand. I'm leaning toward a hornady 366, pros and cons?
 

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I've been loading on a 366 for over 20 years now and really like it. It is a heavy duty machine that turns out consistent reloads. You can tailor your crimps just so--I put a nice taper on the ones for my semiauto shotguns. A sleeve bushing is available that will let you use all your MEC powder bushings. The negative is that it is not as "tolerant" as a MEC 600 to various hulls. With my MEC 600 I can load Remington, Winchester, or Federal hulls with no adjustments. With the 366 you'll likely have to make changes for primer depth and crimp. It also took me a long time to get the crimps on the new Winchester high strength hulls just right.

I usually load a run of at least a thousand shells on the 366 and still use my MEC 600 for short runs of hunting loads. Hope this helps
 

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Please Take a look at the RCBS GRAND. It is a fantastic machine! It is packed with great features like turning off the shot and powder without having to empty. Case activated powder and shot drops(no case=no powder or shot spillage)! Emptying the machine is a breeze . And to top it off...LIFETIME parts for free if you ever needed any. I havent.
As far as price goes it is less than all of the big names (spolar, P/W, Dillion,Mec 9000) Give it a look...I can say that I love mine. I also own a Mec 9000 GN and it is a nice machine but I love the Grand!

Reap
 

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Another happy MEC grabber owner who has easily made a lot of different shels on the press. WIth the right charge bar and bushing you can load anything that will drop in your gun.
 

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I've been loading on a 366 for over 20 years now and really like it. It is a heavy duty machine that turns out consistent reloads. You can tailor your crimps just so--I put a nice taper on the ones for my semiauto shotguns. A sleeve bushing is available that will let you use all your MEC powder bushings. The negative is that it is not as "tolerant" as a MEC 600 to various hulls. With my MEC 600 I can load Remington, Winchester, or Federal hulls with no adjustments. With the 366 you'll likely have to make changes for primer depth and crimp. It also took me a long time to get the crimps on the new Winchester high strength hulls just right.

I usually load a run of at least a thousand shells on the 366 and still use my MEC 600 for short runs of hunting loads. Hope this helps
I, too, load on a 366. The issue with the new style Winchester hull is with the hulls, not the 366. Hornady makes a straight walled crimp die that helps with them. And the primer depth issue can be eliminated with the optional spring loaded priming die.

The issues with the 366 include not having a resizing die on the shell plate and the capacity of the primer tube. I have found not having the resizing die on the shell plate does not slow one down as much as one might think; once I get the rhythm going, the finished hulls seem to fly out of the machine. And I have heard an aluminum arrow can be used to replace the brass primer tube to give more capacity. All reloaders have their peculiar issues and when going from one brand to another you just trade one set of issues for a different set. You can do better than a 366 (Spolar?) but it will cost you a bunch more. The 366 is a solid machine and once you have it fine tuned for your load, there is nothing that can get out of adjustment and the only wear parts are the plastic wad guide and the measure casting seals.
 

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The only thing you have to be watchful of is the shot hanging up in the drop tubes with Mec Loaders. The larger shot sizes and heavier drops tends to make the shot hang up and not drop when you want it to, thus leaving shot all over your loader turret. I used to have quite a few drops of 5's all over the place, loading slower with larger shot is a good idea. Even taking a crescent wrench handle a lightly striking the drop tube can be a help to get shot to drop when you want it too.

PD
 

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7 1/2's and smaller are not a problem in heavier loads, but it's the larger shot that causes the problems. Good news there are less pellets to pick up but you have to do it more often.

PD
 
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