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New member, advice appreciated.

2479 Views 25 Replies 23 Participants Last post by  gcbailey
Hi i have recently joined my high school school trap team in northern MN and I’m loving the sport. I’ve grown up shooting and hunting so naturally when I found out my school had a trap team I joined it. I’m using my dad’s old style ruger red label. I was doing some research and read that a high shooting gun is preferable for trap, and that the red label is a fairly flat shooting gun. I was wondering if the red label would be good for trap, or if I should look into a different gun. I’ve been getting half decent scores and The gun fits me fairly well, thanks for having me in your community.
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Hi i have recently joined my high school school trap team in northern MN and I’m loving the sport. I’ve grown up shooting and hunting so naturally when I found out my school had a trap team I joined it. I’m using my dad’s old style ruger red label. I was doing some research and read that a high shooting gun is preferable for trap, and that the red label is a fairly flat shooting gun. I was wondering if the red label would be good for trap, or if I should look into a different gun. I’ve been getting half decent scores and The gun fits me fairly well, thanks for having me in your community.
Try cutting moleskin in 1 inch wide strips and adding them 1 at a time to the top of the stock to raise your cheek up. Add them until you start making smokeball hits MOST of the time from post 3 at 16 yards.
 

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You would be better off with a purpose built trap gun, and they do shoot higher. I started with a Remington Model 31 field gun. Shot very flat, had to completely cover the target to break it. Trouble is, you can easily go too high on the target without knowing it and shoot completely over it.
 

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Welcome to the forum. First off, don't believe every single thing you read or hear. Some of it will be good advice and some will be not so good advice. One thing about this sport is that everyone is different. Some love a high shooting gun, others love a flatter shooting gun. You just need to find out what works for you. I would work with your coach and see what instruction he has to offer. If that does not get the results you are looking for seek out another proven coach/trainer. It won't take long for you to figure out what works for you.
 

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Welcome to the forum! My first time shooting clays was in the 1980's with an 870. The man who ran the operation gave me a used Red Label to try and I ended up buying it from him. I shot lots of birds with the gun, but it beat the snot out of me. When I started shooting trap, I used it until I tried guns set up for trap and went out and bought a used trap gun and traded for several more used guns until I could afford the gun I have now. Just remember the Red Label is a field gun and you pretty much need to cover the bird. Go enjoy yourself and make friends who will let you try different guns.
 

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When I started shotgun sports, my first gun was coicidentally a Ruger Red Label, with an English stock... bought for hunting birds.

I used that gun with its choke tubes for quite sometime... I liked the gun and while a field gun and flat shooter, it broke birds when I learned to cover the birds.

The gun is only a tool. We all talk about the biggest issue in breaking clays, that its the Indian, not the arrow... once you've felt that you have taken the Red Label as far as you can and that you're going to truly stick with the sport, only then consider buying a target gun.

Respectfully offered...
 

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You're young and tough. If you can handle the recoil and break targets (decent consistent scores with it) go for it, but I would strongly suggest trying to find a reasonably priced dedicated trap gun. They're out there. I have nothing against Rugers. I own a 28 and 20 gauge, but the 12 was not made to be a trap gun. JMO
Good luck and good shooting
Steve
 

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I'm wondering - where does that Red Label shoot at the pattern board? It'd be good for you to know that as a starting point. You might be surprised. Post a picture of the pattern if you do test it. 13 yards is all you need with an x in the middle of a piece of cardboard. One shot for each piece of cardboard. Start with 3 or 4.
 

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Many trap shooters (myself included) started out shooting with a field gun. I shot a field grade Remington 1100 with a modified choke for a couple years. Shot good scores, broke straights now and then with it. Some folks,like me, don't care for the real high shooting guns. I like a 60/40 pattern. Shoot that Red Label till you see if you like the sport and figure the game out. Just my opinion, everybody is different. Have fun and be safe. Colonel
 

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Keep in mind that a dedicated trap gun doesn't have to cost a lot. There are many 870 trap and guns like them made for trap that can be had for reasonable money. Shoot what you got but IMHO being able to see the bird on top of your barrel is easier.
 

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Hi i have recently joined my high school school trap team in northern MN and I’m loving the sport. I’ve grown up shooting and hunting so naturally when I found out my school had a trap team I joined it. I’m using my dad’s old style ruger red label. I was doing some research and read that a high shooting gun is preferable for trap, and that the red label is a fairly flat shooting gun. I was wondering if the red label would be good for trap, or if I should look into a different gun. I’ve been getting half decent scores and The gun fits me fairly well, thanks for having me in your community.
Welcome to the sport. Glad you are enjoying yourself.
The High shooting guns aren't for everyone.
Some of the very best Trap shooters like a flat shooting gun.
If the Ruger fits no harm in shooting it for a bit.
Avoid heavy shells. 1 ounce @ 1180 FPS or 1&1/8th ounce @ 1145 FPS are all you need for 16 yards, doubles or short yardage handicap.

As you gain some experience with the Red Label I am sure you will decide what you like in your price range, BT99 & Remington 1100 are 2 of my favorite entry level guns.

You can build up your comb as described above if you want the gun to shoot higher.
I wouldn't be to quick to make changes, work with your coach before you start making changes.

Its All Good

West
 

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Honestly everyone that has responded has given good advice. In the end there is no magic gun or poi as everyone is different. If just takes time to find out what YOU like and need. Don't get frustrated honing your craft , unfortunately it is part of the game, but once you find a set up and some success stick with it for a bit.
 

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Welcome aboard, and thanks for showing interest in shooting sports. And helping keep the sport strong 👍
I also started with my Red Label, it fit me great, never felt any recoil, or face slap.
I shot my first 25 with it, within the first 6 weeks of shooting competively. The only problem I had was mine shot flat.. Like about center mass 6 inches low. So I never knew if I was hitting birds hard without a score keeper, as the top barrel would block the bird.
After adding some moleskin to raise the comb I could see the bird as I shot it.
In my opinion gun Fit is the most important thing going. You can always make the gun shoot higher by adding moleskin, or having the comb cut.
If you know you are going to be shooting for years , and can afford a gun designed for trap. And that has the proper fit for you then yes buy a dedicated Trap gun.
If you are new and unable to afford shells, gun, and bird fees. Then I recommend you stay with the Red Label for now.
Just my opinion 🤷
 

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I'd be more concerned with fit and how you are feeling after shooting a couple hundred rounds than whether where you want you poi to look like at this point. Proper fit will help with recoil, whether or not you are recoil sensitive, there is a cumulative effect of recoil on fatigue...think about how you will feel at the end of a 90 degree say and found out you are in a shoot off, do you feel prepared to extend for a couple more hours?
 

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Hi i have recently joined my high school school trap team in northern MN and I’m loving the sport. I’ve grown up shooting and hunting so naturally when I found out my school had a trap team I joined it. I’m using my dad’s old style ruger red label. I was doing some research and read that a high shooting gun is preferable for trap, and that the red label is a fairly flat shooting gun. I was wondering if the red label would be good for trap, or if I should look into a different gun. I’ve been getting half decent scores and The gun fits me fairly well, thanks for having me in your community.
Welcome! You've found one of the fun games out there.

The Red Label is a fine starter gun. Use it until you develop a sense of what you want and develop s style. Some like really high shooting guns while some others don't. It's your score sheet so find what works for you.

Eventually, I would look into another gun only because the Red Label is discontinued. If a gun is going to break, it is always at the worst moment.

Good guns do not have to be expensive, though they certainly can be. If at all possible (and it may not be) go to large ATA shoots such as the Grand American and you can demo pretty much anything you want.

Take your time, learn and enjoy yourself!
 

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henrydog,

I disagree. The magic gun is the one that fits you and the magic POI is the one that works for you.

Jason
No I agree, I own mine. However, what works for me is differnt than you. A K80 that does not shoot were I look is not going to help me out vs a 870 that inkballs for me. English is not my strong suit.
 
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If you plan on strictly shooting trap sure, something that shoots 70/30 high or more is great. If you are on a team that might go shoot trap then five stand or sporting clays, skeet and even bunker trap and olympic skeet at a single competition, then I would stay with something that was flatter, like 60/40.
 

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All good info. Just remember to shut the auto-safety every time with the Red Label. Shoot a few other guns that people have and find something that works best for you. It may even be your gun that works best for now. Welcome to the sport and thank you and especially your parents for getting into the shooting game. We need more fine young gentleman such as yourself to perpetuate our passion.
 
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