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Have always used a PC but its time for a new one and I want to know whether to stick with a PC or go to a Mac. Have an I-phone and an I-Pad and love them so was wondering if going to a Mac is worth the extra money. Need some opinions please.
 

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I switched from PC to MAC approximately 8 years ago. There is no comparison between the two. The MAC is in every way superior to the PC. My wife still uses a Toshiba PC laptop. (Windows 7) Once in a great while I will use it. What a piece of junk!! By all means get the MAC; you will not be disappointed once you get used to the system. I have the OS X Lion and love it. Ed
 

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If you are on the fence here is a push. I switched to mac 9 years ago I still have the same macpro. It is running as good as the day I unpacked it. I have none of the issues pc have. Can open any file without going to the web to look up drivers. Not nicked and dime buy programs to run music videos etc. The mac system is geared toward the arts photography video etc. You already have a iPhone and a I pad if you would like all out of them you can buy a mac main frame to intergrade all system together.

I will give you the negative mac all so tries to intergrade its way into everything. Day planers who you buy your music and movies from etc. I’m happy with my system hope make the correct decision also.

One of the best places to purchase a mac from is macmall. They have great deals on window/mac programs you can run word excel etc. on mac and a faction of the cost to run windows based programs on a pc platform. If I can help you more pm me.
 

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Don't get a mac to game. If your going to surf a mac is ok but if you want to do most anything else get a pc. Most apps are designed for pc. Just sayen.
 

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My son builds gaming machines for a hobby/side job.

he replaced his old laptop (a seven year old Mac iBook) with a new MacBook Pro - retina display with SSD drive and 16 GB RAM.

He says the Mac plays games as well as his monster tower PC running Windows 8, also with 16 GB RAM.

I run an IT company - we specialize in Macs - 85% of the machines we deal with are Macs. 95% of the problems I deal with involve PC's.

Food for thought.
 

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If you get a Mac with an Intel chip it will run Windows and thus Windows programs. Not at the same time. You have to switch back and forth between the operating systems. But, this can help prevent loss of expensive or useful Windows software.

For those used to Windows, there will be a bit of a learning curve with a Mac, because some commands are different. This is not a big problem. It's just going to take a bit to get used to it.

The nice thing about Macs is that they are not as full of security holes as Windows machines are. This does not mean they are immune from malware. It's just that it's easier for criminals to target Windows machines and there are simply more Windows machines to exploit. One issue is that if you run Windows OS and software on your Mac your Mac will be as vulnerable as any Windows machine while Windows is running.

One big drawback to Macs is the cost. Especially the software. I suppose, though, it could be justified if you look at it from the standpoint that Macs don't become obsolete as quickly as Windows machines.

Myself, I went with Linux, specifically Ubuntu and Lubuntu. Because the operating system and software are free. Even though Linux has progressed over the years for simplicity, it still is not as easy to use as Windows or Mac. I will not surf the Internet with a Windows machine.
 

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Till I retired a couple of months ago I provided technical support to about 300 Macs. They were a mix of iMacs and MacBook Pros. This was in a university setting with student labs, high end printing, animation, digital photography and electronically generated art, both 2D and 3D along with both professors and office system users.

The Mac were very easy to support both because they had very, very little hardware trouble and when troubles did arise with the hardware, Apple Care (the Apple extended warranty program) provided excellent support. Apple technical support has always been ranked #1 among all computers.

One big advantage is that if you do need support, it is just a phone call away and if you put your help request in via e-mail you can specify when you want them to call you. If you say immediate, your phone will ring within a minute or so. The longest I ever had to wait was about two minutes. AND a big advantage is the person on the other phone will be speaking American English and not some Indian dialect. Apple has their call centers in the country the call is made from, at least for the larger countries like the U.S.

Apple users also have a number of forums (they are called communities) available right on the Apple Web Site. The users provided a lot of very useful information to allow us to get very much more out of the machines usefulness than the users I supported even realized could be done.

The two main problems I had involved systems that just kept going and going and going. I had to justify replacing six and seven year old machines that were still running fine but the program suppliers created newer versions that we had to train the students on so they could be ready to enter the job market being familiar with the latest technology. These newer software versions sometimes would not run on the six or seven year old systems. Note that this same condition will also occur with PCs. I do know that the life of the Macs was considerably longer than the PCs used in other parts of the university. The other problem was that users did not realize that the Mac they had was capable of doing a whole lot more than what they realized. By training the instructors I could show them how to get a lot more of the features inherent in the Mac into the users regular routine usage.

One of the reasons Macs will continue to run is that they generally use a higher grade of hardware. Foe example, a manufacturer may make two or three different hard drives with the same basic specifications as regards storage size but the mechanical systems are designed so that a higher grade hard drive will have a much longer life under harder working conditions. The same holds for other hardware items.

If you go Mac be sure to check out the help files that show a PC user how to make an easy conversion to using Macs. There are also several open source (you can read that as FREE) programs that can be used on Macs and thereby let you get away without having to purchase programs to do the same thing. Open Office and Libre office provide virtually the same capabilities for free as Microsoft's Word, Excel and other programs for most users.

I do know that there would be absolutely no way I could have supported the same number of PCs as I did Macs. So yes, I would definitely say "Once you Go Mac, you will never go back!"
 

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You CAN run Windows AND Mac at the same time on the same machine IF you use a virtulization program like Parallels. You will have to buy Parallels or another similar program VMFusionware and the actual Window operating system (Windows 7 suggested) but then you can run Windows ONLY specific programs but you can freely transfer data back and forth between the two different operating systems. You could also use Linux or such with Parallels.

If you use Apple's provided Bootcamp software (free) but you still need to buy the Microsoft OS and application software to run Windows based software. Or you could go to Linux but with either Microsoft or Linux you will have to restart when you want to go to the other OS.
 

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I have a Mac pro from work. Still trying to figure it out, how do I "right click?"

Also it seems there are multiple websites that I can not view video on because MAC does not seem to like flash/java on websites where this is a window to click "play" for instance showing the features of a new gun on a manufacturer website.

How do I fix this? I get the error message of something like flash/java is not supported and it is just a black box that doesn't work. So then I come home and get my normal PC and it works fine. That is very frustrating, there probably is a patch or something that I am unaware of that you guys that have had macs for years know about? Please let me know what I need to download to make the flash/java work.
 

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Noknock1,

Right click on a Mac Pro can be done a couple of ways. The ways listed are based on you having a modern USB mouse but a wireless can be similar. If you have only an OLD one button Apple mouse then option 1 is your only way. If you have the Mighty Mouse (wireless and combines features of a trackpad and mouse in one unit), use the Help files to learn about it

1. Hold the Control Key when you click on the left mouse button. This equals a right click.

2. Open systems preferences, abbreviated here to -SP-, (available from the Apple in the upper left corner or the "gear wheel" icon on the dock at bottom of screen or from opening Systems Preferences in the Applications folder. Yes, Apple usually offers two or three ways to do the same thing. Which you use is up to you. Once the -SP- is open, find the Mouse preference panel. It is usually in the second row (labeled Hardware). Click on it and depending on your mouse and software, various mouse settings become available. There are a couple of different mouse units and software so you will have to see what your system shows. You can click on an unused part of the desktop to show Finder in the top menu and then to access the Help menu and enter "mouse" (without the quotes) to see your particular set up process.

To get Adobe's Flash Player you can go to the Adobe.com website and download Flash Player. Flash has been a very heavily used malware attack vector so be sure to have it update automatically. This is true for Apple and Windows. Once installed you can check it using the -SP- Flash Player preference panel.

Java is another malware attack vector and unless you need it for a specific use, it is best left uninstalled. If you do need it, you can get it from Oracle.com but once installed, turn it off and only turn it on when you actually need it. Then turn it off when you are done.
 

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What pyrdek said about flash and java being malware exploits is spot on. Some of the things that increase usefulness for the Internet are also some of the biggest drawbacks for security as well.

Instead of turning java on and off, you can use two different browsers. Have java turned off in your main browser and use it for most of your Internet use. Turn java on in the other browser and use it for those sites that require it that you know are safe.
 

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thanks guys for the advice, I have a two button wireless mouse with the track wheel. Not being able to right click has been driving me nuts. I guess I don't "need" java, but it and flash is nice on certain animated websites.

I was on a gun site some time ago, maybe Browning and was looking at a new rifle and I just had a black box. I go to my HP all-in-one, go to same website and got to watch a neat video on the rifle. So go to oracle to install the flash. I hate having to worry about turning it on and off though, I will inevitably forget...
 
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