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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Going to New Salem North Dakota the last week in Oct. Looking for a couple of days on self guided hunts or trespass fees if any information it would be greatly appreciated. I live in Ohio we have a few spots but just looking for a couple more. We can drive more than a hour away There will only be 2 of us Thank you, Mark
 

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If you go about 50 miles west of New Salem that gets you into the Dickenson area, from there go north or south and you will find lots of good areas. Most off of the land is privately owned but I have had very good luck just stopping at farms and asking. Very friendly people and they usually will let you hunt unless they have some hunters coming in or maybe they have leased the hunting out. In any event they will probably give you an idea of where you could get into some hunting. I have hunted pheasants in this area about a dozen times and never had a bad year. Don't be negative or stress out about the asking part and no matter what be polite and thank them for their consideration.

Take a camera because there is a lot of quirky 'farm art' around. Evidently the long winters inspire some of them to create various sculptures out of old farm implements and assorted metal junk.
 

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My Daughter and Son-in-law live in Western N.D. and there are a lot of pheasants on their property. I would also suggest that you bring a camera as there are a lot of old abandoned buildings and a lot of old machinery that the locals leave in old iron graveyards. I always call Western N.D. Heaven on earth.
 

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Thank you for your replies we always go and knock on doors sometimes it works But at least you get to meet very nice & interesting people Thats part of the fun of going different places.
 

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Hunting in Iowa in years past we had good luck hunting abandoned railways. It works good with 2 guys. Just take turns posting up at the end of the mile. We only went where the rails had been removed and no one had a problem with it.
Good luck
Bill
 

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First off get a PLOTS map. Private Land Open To Sportsmen. You can go on line and print out your area or pick up a book once you arrive. They are free. Some of those areas are hammered pretty hard but we've also had some good luck. Technically, land that isn't posted is open to hunt in Nodak but we ask whenever possible. We've made some friends that way. I hear that the crops are going come off a bit later this year so you'll need to concentrate on early and late. Unlike South Dakota, you can hunt at sunrise in Nodak. We love it there. Great people. Good luck.
 

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I waited a while to comment here. I've hunted out of state for pheasant, grouse and quail now for 40 years. This will be my 15th year in N.D. I don't want to turn you off from your idea. Times have really changed though over the years.Plot land can be good if you get some weather. Otherwise it's pretty much hammered. If someone lets you hunt readily you can bet your life he lets everyone else go. Some farmers are asked 30 times by the end of the second week. You'll see thousands upon thousands of acres but locating who owns it and getting permission can be overwhelming and countless miles of driving. N.D. being a right to hunt state allows you to hunt unposted land. Once again if it looks good and isn't posted it has been hunted heavily already. Now you may find birds there but there spooky as hell and flush well out of range. I'm not trying to dicourage anyone from a much anticipated hunting adventure. I do believe that magazine articles and such lead people to believe that if you go they will be there in numbers. Just knock on a door, be friendly . You'll be granted permission. Just walk the hunter walking trails in wisc. or Minn. and they just flush off of the sides for good sport. Go and have the adventure that you dream of. Just don't buy into the idea that it's going to be like asporting dog or outdoor life article. They paint a rosy picture. That's there job. Oh yeah. They also have told all there other readers where to go so you won't be alone. GoodHunting but be prepared for the reality. Comments wecomed. I hope everyone has a wonderful season.
 

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I've been lucky to have friends that lived there and still have family there. ^ All the advice up above is good advice. I'm planning on going again in a couple weeks. From past experience I've noticed that an area may seem hunted out as other hunters leave only to have pheasants hiding there the very next day. Our best results were on days when it warmed up. If you get a couple days of decent weather, make the most of it. We walked about 8 miles a day or more on the good days. Walk and cover as much as you can and keep your eyes open out there. Take your time when you still hunt. If you get your hands on a dog, you'll triple your chances of getting a bird.

My first time out was freezing with constant wind at 25-30mph. It was terrible. I froze. Only saw one bird that day and buddy only got one shot off that day. Next day was warm and beautiful. We both saw a few, and managed to bag one, and the more ground we covered, the more I learned how and where they hide.

We spent almost 3/4 of the day looking for land that was open to the public or where we could have permission to hunt. You most likely will need to ask permission and find some farmers that will let you hunt. If you offer them some $$ to hunt on their land it always helps or if you bag a couple, it would be good advice to offer them one. We did at one and they refused any offer. Instead they invited us in for coffee and gave us ideas of where to try. Very nice people up in N.D. Third day we borrowed a farmers dog and we flushed up so many that day we both limited out and managed to burn up all the shells we carried. Farmer couldn't believe where we found them and took his dog out to same spot and he got a couple. You just never know.
 

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I'll add a few more comments since the above comments confirmed what I said. I didn't want to be a negetive. We like bad weather . it bunches the birds up in the pockets and they hold well. Beautiful weather is nice but the birds are out in that countless thousands of acres of wheat stubble and they spend the day there running like race horses and flushing wild. Don't go in a two wheel drive vehicle. The weather there can be beautiful all week . Then again it can get brutal overnight and you can't tell where the roads are and covered in ice. Yeah be prepared to drive a hundred or more miles per day to find a good spot or two and get permission. You will spend as much time driving and asking as hunting on most days. Some days more. Let us know if you went and how you did. Good Luck
 

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I'll take issue a bit with Octoberclaire. We've been going out there for 10 years and don't have issues. Part of that is because we go late, but there are some things you can do regardless of time of year...
1. Ditches. If it's a gravel road or two-track, and not posted on either side, you can hunt the ditches. Can be very productive and comes in really handy if you've got an older hunter or older dog with you.
2. Drive the two tracks. The street may be named 40th street, but it may only be two tire ruts. Get back on those when looking for cover. Get away from the paved roads and even the gravel roads to the extent you can. That's tougher if its been a wet year. Bring a tow strap!!
3. Smaller Plots sections away from towns. Yes they've been hunted but not as much. Plan your approach and your hunt on these.
4. Once the corn is down, look for the low weedy areas in the middle of or adjacent to the corn. Assuming its not posted or fenced or you have permission.

I recommend going in November...the later the better. Fewer hunters and the corn is down. The locals are finished with birds and are focusing on deer hunting. The people are a bit more welcoming once the crowd has diminished.

Good luck!
 

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You make a good point. However there isn't any corn where we hunt. I love the idea of a late hunt but after the first week of nov. the weather can be unpredictably brutal. Single diget temps. with 20 mile an hour wind. If you live a reasonable distance from your destination weather may not be an issue. A couple of 30 hour straight through drives in white out and ice conditions cured me. The ditches where we hunt can produce but the road hunters pressure them pretty well. Not very good dog work for us. Last year was a rough year as most of the plots were hayed off. Everybody has a differant opinion of what a good hunt is and differant expectations. Once again good luck this season.
 

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We go Thanksgiving week....but we're in the south-central part of the state. We've run into some brutal weather, but mostly its been ok. That time of year it can be zero one day and 40 the next...but the wind just never goes away. Sometimes you run into that blessed first snowfall...when the birds hold so amazingly close. October...looks like you're a setter person...which automatically makes you OK in my book!
 

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I agree with Trail. I lived in ND for 26 years and hunted pheasants every year. The later you can go the better. Most of the locals are done hunting after the first two weekends. Knock on doors and you will find land to hunt and meet some of the friendliest people in the world.

DC
 

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Yes, we normally go up there in December. Very little hunting pressure by then and the ground is frozen which means you can get into some of the sloughs that you would otherwise avoid.
 

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3 of my buddies have traveled to ND this year. They got birds but it was a lot of work. All had good dogs and stayed for 3-4 days. Fun trip to make.
 

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I saw on TV that North Dakota is known as the state with 11 months of winter and one month of bad ice skating..?. Flame Away...Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks to everyone that responded to me. Came back from ND Had a great time limited out everyday 2 guys 1 dog (pointer) I think we spent more time getting permisson then hunting but meat a lot of really nice people Very interesting to talk to. Some of the friendliest people always waving when they drive by or stop to talk to you.
 

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Back after eight days of hunting in N.D. Unseasonably warm weather. Great days and so so days and inbetween. Drove a thousand miles while there traveling , looking and asking. Thanks to the wonderfully gracious landowners that allow us to hunt your land and visit with you. Thankyou to the landowners who said no for taking time out of your day to answer and open your door to a stranger. We had some very good conversations,talked politics and met each other. Not one stonechip in the windshield. Now waiting for some cold fronts and some ducks and geese.
 

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Eight days to shoot 12 roosters each! Not my idea of a good trip.... Made my first trip to Nodak in 1994 and have been there every year for at least one pheasant hunt since. I hunt in the Glen Ullin, Richardton area(just west of New Salem, north of Mott) You would not believe how good it was back in the 90's! I'm ONLY 6 hours away but the attractive part is they always open the 2nd Sat in Oct., the week before Sodak and often a week before Minn. We used to be able to limit on ducks and pheasants in the SE corner of Nodak but it keeps getting harder as the hunting pressure increases every year. Amazing the difference in hunting pressure a decade or 2 will make! I guess it depends on how you define a quality hunt.
If you really want to kill pheasants South Dakota might cost a little $ BUT they have ROOSTERS!!
Joe O
 

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