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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Sounds like the coach teaching that is the same one who started that air plane spotting mount. You know, point the gun straight up and slowly bring it down.
I see them as well. Looks way overdone to me but to each their own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
the op said that they raised the gun to the mount before it was fully closed, I didn't see them mention they did this while the person on the station before them was shooting.

I can't say I have seen someone raise their shotgun up to mount while it was open, but I have seen all types of different methods people have for shouldering their gun
They wait for their turn before mounting the gun. It is fully open when mounted. After settling in on the stock with it slightly elevated as they lower their head down they bring up the barrel too closed.
I asked two people I see there regularly. Both said they were just trying it out. No mention of the reasoning behind it.
 

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If you do something bas-ackwards long enough you will believe it’s normal and get good at it. Kind of like typing with 2 fingers. Someone comes along who was taught to type can do it faster than you while on the phone holding a conversation.
 

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if i was shooting with someone that was mounting there gun that way i would stop them, not safe!
You might TRY. But you wouldn’t succeed. ATA sez you can hold your gun any way you want. The mount is part of the hold. Unless the shooter is sweeping with the muzzle it isn’t unsafe. Your hissy fit about his mount will get a charge of interfering with the harmony of the shoot and may get you tossed out on your ear.
 
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You might TRY. But you wouldn’t succeed. ATA sez you can hold your gun any way you want. The mount is part of the hold. Unless the shooter is sweeping with the muzzle it isn’t unsafe. Your hissy fit about his mount will get a charge of interfering with the harmony of the shoot and may get you tossed out on your ear.
Ata rule , States you may not raise your gun ,point, or create observable distraction
Screenshot_20210503-180031_Drive~2.jpg
 

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Ata rule , States you may not raise your gun ,point, or create observable distraction View attachment 1754091
Where is the distraction? Hell, you raising your gun is just as much a “distraction” as the fellow described in the op. To him YOU mount your gun funny.
 
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Where is the distraction? Hell, you raising your gun is just as much a “distraction” as the fellow described in the op. To him YOU mount your gun funny.
You're right, flashmax; dustydoo is misinterpreting the ATA rule he quotes.
It applies to shooter's gunhandling actions BEFORE their turn to shoot.
When it's their turn, anything goes that isn't unsafe.
 

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We have a just few kids on my sons trap team that do it... They seem like they want to shoot quickly and get through the round as soon as possible.

Personally, I am not a fan, but what do I know. I guess if you are ready to shoot, then you are ready to shoot.
 

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Hey whatever works, it's a process and a slightly different one for all of us, as long as it is safe then have at it,
 

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I have seen people do this, and when the gun is closed it usually is just being held high close to the mounting position when closed, and not yet making contact with the shoulder or cheek. If you are concentrating on what you should be, you should not even notice it. It seems that trapshooters always have a need to criticize others about their techniques and routines. If they are looking for a reason, they will always find something. Worry about your own game.

Same reason 7 1/2's or 8's draws such a response about right and wrong. There basically is no right and wrong way unless it is unsafe, or very distracting. I don't see either in this method. If you see that movement put horse blinders on that protrude past your glass lenses about an inch, and just shoot the damn thing. Watch out for the bugs, butterflies, airplanes, blowing leaves, birds, wads, high flying runaway broken bird chips, ants crawling up your legs, etc.

Another thing here, if you think this is unsafe, what about people closing their guns and holding the gun about a 45 degree angle out in front three shooters before their turn. Not to even mention release triggers. :eek: If everyone closed their guns this way I doubt there would be patterns on the back of the trap house, or gopher holes in the sod right in front of the pads.
 

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I'd be interested if someone could come up with a solid reason for doing it.
I would be interested as well.

I have seen people do this, and when the gun is closed it usually is just being held high close to the mounting position when closed, and not yet making contact with the shoulder or cheek. If you are concentrating on what you should be, you should not even notice it. It seems that trapshooters always have a need to criticize others about their techniques and routines. If they are looking for a reason, they will always find something. Worry about your own game.

Same reason 7 1/2's or 8's draws such a response about right and wrong. There basically is no right and wrong way unless it is unsafe, or very distracting. I don't see either in this method. If you see that movement put horse blinders on that protrude past your glass lenses about an inch, and just shoot the damn thing. Watch out for the bugs, butterflies, airplanes, blowing leaves, birds, wads, high flying runaway broken bird chips, ants crawling up your legs, etc.

Another thing here, if you think this is unsafe, what about people closing their guns and holding the gun about a 45 degree angle out in front three shooters before their turn. Not to even mention release triggers. :eek: If everyone closed their guns this way I doubt there would be patterns on the back of the trap house, or gopher holes in the sod right in front of the pads.
At the time you start your gun to the shoulder pocket is when mentally you should click the focus switch for intense mental concentration. When the butt hits the shoulder pocket and simultaneously your cheek connects with comb, you call for the target.

This type of mount would sound to be a significant interruption in gun mount fluidness which involves mental focussing.

I stand open minded about this method till I can observe it in use. I would enjoy having two or three advocates who teach the method present to evaluate the positive/negative aspects.
 

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I am going to take a guess here.....
It takes more muscles and energy to close your gun mounted.
I bring my gun up from the pad and let the forend settle into my other hand. The gun's weight actually assists the closing of the breech. In the mounted position your forend hand has no assist and has to bear the weight alone. Meanwhile Your grip hand has to use more energy to hold the buttstock in position and still. May not mean anything for 25 target, but what about 200 ?
We need a Kinesiologist to actually confirm the mechanics of both methods.
On the other hand you have to remember someone once said "That it is one thing to have people think you don't know what you are doing. It is another to prove it to them. "
 
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