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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you have the super high grade wood or your needing a comb on a long time competition stock it's easy to have it done at any of the top shops and your adding $$$ to to an already special stock.

BUT

What if you have that lower value wood on an older gun and you just like to shoot it at tournaments sometimes. It needs an adjustable comb but most comb jobs cost 3x what the woods worth. What are the lower cost options? ??

And BTW... I have one already done on a target gun and another kinda custom stock.. I know where to turn in that regard.

Thanks for your help. ...
 

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Do it yourself. When adjustable combs first started to appear in the early 80's, I made my own on a Beretta 680 stock. My son still shoots it and it still has the comb I made. All you need is a band saw a couple of 1/4" pins and a couple of set screws. Piece of cake.
 

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Put on layers of moleskin to get the height you need. You can layer the moleskin so it raises the height but doesn't change the cast. If you need to lower it again, just peel it off. The entire cost is only a couple dollars. Several of the top sporting clays shooters use this on their 7-8,000 dollar guns.
 

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As you've figured out it costs the same in time and hardware to install an adjustable comb on high end or low end wood. Two options, search for a used stock with an adjustable comb at a reason able price or as suggested do the installation yourself purchasing the hardware from one of the suppliers such as Stock Positioning who I favor for price and value.

If you have a drill press and band saw, you should be able to do all the cuts and fitting with these two tools, if not maybe a friend who has them could help you do them. A mill works better for inletting but a drill press will work with right cutting tool.

The old style hardware which is still available uses two round base pieces in the stock requires just drilling but are more difficult to center and require cutting deeper into the stock which may require wood glued inside the stock. The base plate system requires inletting but is shallower overall making it somewhat less intrusive than the two piece system .

I saw a shooter who cut his comb and screwed the baseplate hardware directly on top of the stock, his comb needed to go up not down so it solved his problem, obviously he didn't care about appearance only function.

Surfer
 

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I have molded a couple of cheek pieces from Kydex sheet to raise the comb and make it a parallel comb on 2 field guns.

It is easy to mold comes in different thicknesses, I use 1/16 or 1/8 in. Coming up with one that looks fairly decent in size shape is the hardest part.

If you mess up just reheat it will flatten right out an try again. Can be cut and shaped with tin snips and cleaned up on a sander before and after molding.

Did one on a synthetic stock and it is held on with small black torx screws, on the wood stock I did 3M side molding tape holds fine and can be removed with O damage.

Also works on rifles for good cheekwelds with scopes.
 
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