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My 725 with Factory comb is a bit long for me. However, cutting it is very involved due to the way Browning constructs their comb. So I struggled for 6 months and built up some serious head trash shooting 5 stand sporting poorly ,but with determination

I got this response on another forum and want to share it as it might help someone on this forum. I tried the suggestion and shot the best 3 rounds of 5 stand in a year. Here it is.

" It just depends on how much too long the LOP is. When I have a student that has this problem I have them to move their leading hand back on the forearm. This will compensate for a stock that is too long. On the other hand, if the stock is too short moving the hand forward will help. I would say that a long LOP could cause recoil problems. Also a long stock will sometimes raise the shooters head and create an over problem. Remember, (in my opinion) a gun that fits is a pleasure to shoot. My definition of good gun fit (not necessarily perfect fit) is simple. If the gun goes up easy, shoots where you look and doesn't hurt you it will be a fairly close fit."

Mike McAlpine
The Clay Target Academy
 
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Do you like the gun? Did you buy it to shoot it or re sell it?
Listen to Tron, he knows of what he speaks.
 

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Just cut the stock and also cut the rod that sets the comb. Once you cut the rod, mill a groove for a flat screwdriver. Pretty simple stuff.
Trons right, I did that to a couple of browning stocks after I put countercoils on them.

jack mc
 

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" It just depends on how much too long the LOP is. When I have a student that has this problem I have them to move their leading hand back on the forearm. This will compensate for a stock that is too long...
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a gun that fits is a pleasure to shoot. My definition of good gun fit (not necessarily perfect fit) is simple. If the gun goes up easy, shoots where you look and doesn't hurt you it will be a fairly close fit."
Please don't take this the wrong way, but if you said those first three sentences to a European shooter in general, and a British shooter in specific you would be laughed out of the room.

The second part of the quote is spot on.

The FIRST step of buying a shotgun is gun fit - so is the second thing, and the third thing. Everything else can be dealt with, but if the gun doesn't fit scores will be low and recoil may be painful.
 

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My experience has been that an ill fitting gun can cause some real problems now and down the road. My first trap gun was a model 12. It didn't fit but I was so proud of it and the fancy stock that I didn't want to make it adjustable. Listened to some of the old timers at the gun club that told me just shoot it. You'll get used to it. By golly they were right. When I finally got a TM 1 with an adjustable stock that actually fit me I couldn't hit anything. I went to the pattern board with both guns and shot them off hand 3 shots each into 1 pattern each gun to get a nice average on my POI and walla! problem figured out. The M 12 had always shot 6" left. I stuck with it long enough that I learned to shoot to the right of straight aways and compensate all other targets for the errant POI. Lessen learned. If I really like a gun I make a commitment to it. I make it fit perfectly. (usually adjustable stuff so the gun can be sold later and made to fit the new owner) I realize up front that most or all of the money I put into the adjustable stuff probably won't come back at resale. OH well. Small price to pay to make you and the gun perform the best possible.
 

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One more thing while I am rambling on. When I get a new gun, before I invest any time or money in fitting, I take it to the pattern board to check POI. I know that a bench rested gun needs to pattern 70/30 to 80/20 (6 to 9"s) high for me to ever shoot it well. When I am bench resting a shot gun is the ONLY time I adjust myself to the gun instead of adjusting the gun to me. When bench rested I do what ever is necessary to figure 8 the beads and stay right on the target with a good follow through as you would with a rifle. That will tell you where the gun will shoot after fitting. If it's an O/U make sure both barrels pattern well for you. Depending on the guns intended use the height of the POI impact can be slightly different to match the dicipline. Live birds, trap, skeet, sporting, trap doubles. I like my trap doubles gun to shoot slightly higher with the under barrel to accommodate the rapidly rising first target in doubles. Sporting clays I like POI to be as identical as possible for both barrels. If a newly acquired gun doesn't pattern well for me I move it on without any further ado. So many guns so little time!
 

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My 725 with Factory comb is a bit long for me. However, cutting it is very involved due to the way Browning constructs their comb. So I struggled for 6 months and built up some serious head trash shooting 5 stand sporting poorly ,but with determination

I got this response on another forum and want to share it as it might help someone on this forum. I tried the suggestion and shot the best 3 rounds of 5 stand in a year. Here it is.

" It just depends on how much too long the LOP is. When I have a student that has this problem I have them to move their leading hand back on the forearm. This will compensate for a stock that is too long. On the other hand, if the stock is too short moving the hand forward will help. I would say that a long LOP could cause recoil problems. Also a long stock will sometimes raise the shooters head and create an over problem. Remember, (in my opinion) a gun that fits is a pleasure to shoot. My definition of good gun fit (not necessarily perfect fit) is simple. If the gun goes up easy, shoots where you look and doesn't hurt you it will be a fairly close fit."

Mike McAlpine
The Clay Target Academy
This advice stems from an era when little adjustability was available in fitting a gun. You pretty much shot them the way they were.

But there's no reason to today. Just send your stock to Tron if your planning on keeping this gun.
 

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Trons right, I did that to a couple of browning stocks after I put countercoils on them.

jack mc
When I was installing a Jones butt pad adjuster on my BT99, I was able use Browning part # B1337260. This was shorter than the original adjustment rod/screw. Not sure if 725 uses the same system but there is a possibility of finding a shorter screw. I think you could just Dremel a slot if you have steady hands.

" It just depends on how much too long the LOP is. When I have a student that has this problem I have them to move their leading hand back on the forearm. This will compensate for a stock that is too long. On the other hand, if the stock is too short moving the hand forward will help. I would say that a long LOP could cause recoil problems. A
Does not compute. What has forearm to do with hand holding the grip? May be someone can draw a picture? Like others said, with all new tech out there why bear yourself up?
 

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If it doesn't fit right, it won't shoot right.
There somebody out there to make any kind of stock mods you want or need, the trick is to finding that right person or company for the job.
 

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" It just depends on how much too long the LOP is. When I have a student that has this problem I have them to move their leading hand back on the forearm. This will compensate for a stock that is too long. On the other hand, if the stock is too short moving the hand forward will help. I would say that a long LOP could cause recoil problems. Also a long stock will sometimes raise the shooters head and create an over problem.
i do not understand how this would work. so much of it has to do with the amount of drop of the comb and heel and how that affects where your cheek lays and hence your angle of view and if your thumb might block your view. none of the could change with ones hand placement of the forestock although hand placement on it might make a difference on ease of mount for someone who uses a low mount and brings the gun up as in sporting clays to prevent it from catching on ones shoulder or clothing while mounting.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When I was installing a Jones butt pad adjuster on my BT99, I was able use Browning part # B1337260. This was shorter than the original adjustment rod/screw. Not sure if 725 uses the same system but there is a possibility of finding a shorter screw. I think you could just Dremel a slot if you have steady hands.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
i do not understand how this would work. so much of it has to do with the amount of drop of the comb and heel and how that affects where your cheek lays and hence your angle of view and if your thumb might block your view. none of the could change with ones hand placement of the forestock although hand placement on it might make a difference on ease of mount for someone who uses a low mount and brings the gun up as in sporting clays to prevent it from catching on ones shoulder or clothing while mounting.
Just try it and you will see. Long LOP, hold the forearm in the front and your face will be farther back on the stock.
This week I had to rent a gun and it had a very short LOP, so I moved my hand out far and only then started to smash more targets.
My/Your eye is the rear sight on a shotgun. If your eye is above or below the front sight what do you think happens. Aslo, I am shooting 5 stand sporting. Sometimes I am pre-mounted , on other shots I am semi low gun. Where my face and eye land on the gun makes a huge difference.
 

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Your mount and where you place your lead hand on the forend will vary depending on the clay target discipline as well.
An adjustable soft comb paired with a gra-co adjustable length of pull pad are worthy of consideration.
 
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