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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long story short, can the cocking rods in a Citori over/under be straightened so they ride in their tunnels smoother?
Disassembled my receiver for a long overdue cleaning and had to drive the cocking rods out with a piece of 1/8" brass rod. Cleaned both the rods and tunnels with very little change. Problem is where the rods transition into the slotted flats.
Anybody?

cocking rods.jpg
 

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That's exactly how they're supposed to look /act. Those are the ejector trip rods, not cocking rods and they need to stay in position as the hammers are cocked. If you're a reloader, you can leave them out so your gun doesn't eject but otherwise, they're fine.

-Scot
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Scott,
I'll clean everything up and put it back together. Appreciate the info.
 

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Long story short, can the cocking rods in a Citori over/under be straightened so they ride in their tunnels smoother?
Disassembled my receiver for a long overdue cleaning and had to drive the cocking rods out with a piece of 1/8" brass rod. Cleaned both the rods and tunnels with very little change. Problem is where the rods transition into the slotted flats.
Anybody?

View attachment 1644141
They can be straightened but as Scot said "the bend is so they stay in position to trip the ejector sear." If they slide to easily as the hammer reaches it's fully cocked position and is no longer holding them forward they can slide away the ejector sear giving eradict ejection or extraction.

As a case point the first replacement ejector trip rod I bought for a Perazzi came with written instructions that read "after fitting the length and making the side specific cut where it engages the ejector sear ""bow the rod so it reliably trips the ejector. ""

Browning figured out how to get reliability out of what for many years was the premiere Over and Under shotgun. The copies that would be called clones today use the same bow to make the needed resistance. And there are only two mechanisms being used to create the fired shell being ejected and the unfired shell is only extracted/lifted. The first is the independent rod that is pushed forward by the falling hammer. The second is the cocking rod acts on the ejector so the hard resistance of recocking the hammer works on the ejector sear to trip it while opening the action unfired the shell is only extracted/lifted. There are mechanisms where the ejector is going to eject when the action is opened or the mechanical extractor that only cams the the extractor up to lift the shell fired or unfired up so it can be removed, some only use a heavy spring that only pushes out as the action is opened no sear it only extracts.

But in short a hundred years or so ago Browning figured out what it took to make a reliable mechanism that has been copied and modified as to how the hammer acts on it but that simple bow to cause resistance is still the key to reliable functionality.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
They can be straightened but as Scot said "the bend is so they stay in position to trip the ejector sear." If they slide to easily as the hammer reaches it's fully cocked position and is no longer holding them forward they can slide away the ejector sear giving eradict ejection or extraction.

As a case point the first replacement ejector trip rod I bought for a Perazzi came with written instructions that read "after fitting the length and making the side specific cut where it engages the ejector sear ""bow the rod so it reliably trips the ejector. ""

Browning figured out how to get reliability out of what for many years was the premiere Over and Under shotgun. The copies that would be called clones today use the same bow to make the needed resistance. And there are only two mechanisms being used to create the fired shell being ejected and the unfired shell is only extracted/lifted. The first is the independent rod that is pushed forward by the falling hammer. The second is the cocking rod acts on the ejector so the hard resistance of recocking the hammer works on the ejector sear to trip it while opening the action unfired the shell is only extracted/lifted. There are mechanisms where the ejector is going to eject when the action is opened or the mechanical extractor that only cams the the extractor up to lift the shell fired or unfired up so it can be removed, some only use a heavy spring that only pushes out as the action is opened no sear it only extracts.

But in short a hundred years or so ago Browning figured out what it took to make a reliable mechanism that has been copied and modified as to how the hammer acts on it but that simple bow to cause resistance is still the key to reliable functionality.


Al,
Thanks for the thorough explanation, makes sense to me now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
All back together with no leftovers. Much smoother opening. Lower barrel goes bang. Life is good!
 

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After shooting tonight I will be bending my rods back. This post needed to be a couple days sooner, I wouldn’t have done it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah, I tweaked mine back before I put it back together.
 
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