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I would like to hear what peoples thoughts are on LOP. What I would like to know is what is affected if a gun is to short or to long. I guess what I need to know is if a gun is to long what shooting characteristics will I see in my trap game.
 

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If all other dimensions are "right" for you, the longer LOP will put the weight of the shotgun farther away from your body, changing the swing characteristics and may possibly tire you faster over a long day's shooting. -Ed
 

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Finding the right LOP is what you have to do. Make small changes, shoot the gun, and find what works
best for you. HMB
 

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I'd agree with "Edsy" and also add that the gun will catch on your clothing and drive you nuts. Too long, I believe, will also affect your ability to point it properly since your face is moved rearward, as your hands are moved outward too far, and you'll be inclined to fish your head forward to see down the gun better.
 

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Dennis DeVault has discussed LOP in his newsletters. You might try Newsletters
and see what he has to say about the topic. He has built and sold his own guns as well as being a world class stock maker. I would put a lot of faith in what he has to say, and the newsletters get to the point.
 

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Your thumb hitting your nose is a good indication that your Length of pull is too short!!! There are a couple of variables for it being to long though. Try bending your forearm 90 degress to your upper arm and place shotgun up against your upper arm like it was your shoulder and see how your finger reaches the trigger this way. The trigger needs rest in the first notch in your trigger finger. This is the old rule of thumb method of checking your length of pull. This is not always the perfect way to gauge it. Sometimes it is necessary to lengthen the stock so you can raise your eye up a bit (as it follows the stock upward), so with that, you may also have to shorten the length of pull to lower your eye as well. Up to the point that, again your thumb hits your nose (which is bad). Good luck and break em all. Jeff
 

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Your thumb hitting your nose is a good indication that your Length of pull is too short!!! There are a couple of variables for it being to long though. Try bending your forearm 90 degress to your upper arm and place shotgun up against your upper arm like it was your shoulder and see how your finger reaches the trigger this way. The trigger needs rest in the first notch in your trigger finger. This is the old rule of thumb method of checking your length of pull. This is not always the perfect way to gauge it. Sometimes it is necessary to lengthen the stock so you can raise your eye up a bit (as it follows the stock upward), so with that, you may also have to shorten the length of pull to lower your eye as well. Up to the point that, again your thumb hits your nose (which is bad). Good luck and break em all. Jeff
Do a search on You Tube. Lots of info available.
 

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I respectfully suggest that Jeff (Pull & Mark) has misunderstood all that he has heard regarding LOP over the years, or is regurgitating it backwards. Distance from your trigger finger to the crook of your elbow is a poor indicator of correct LOP. Most stock combs that are not "parallel" slope down to the rear so moving your head back by lengthening LOP would lower your eye, not raise it, etc. If you are consistently mounting the shotgun and finding your cheek closer than 2 fingers-widths to the base of your thumb, your LOP "may" be too short. You would not, however, need the LOP to be a lot more than this. -Ed
 

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grip length to trigger blade is another important factor in stock fit.
A good point that I did not understand until recently reading Rollin Oswald's book. I was wondering why my middle finger on my trigger hand was getting battered on the back of the trigger guard. Once I move the trigger forward on my 682 it stopped. It seemed counter intuitive to move the trigger forward to correct the problem, but it worked.
 

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Ed---Did I get it wrong??? I don't think so. The Stock Gets Wider as you move your eye back!!! Which is what happens if you add length of pull to a stock. The distance from your shoulder to your eye remains the same no matter what. So adding or subtracting wood from the stock only moves the receiver forward and backward!!! But as your body grows!!! so does your LOP grow with it.

Of course if you have a movable trigger adj., and need to move the trigger for proper placement for the hand on grip to finger placement first, do so before the crook of the arm trick.

It was a master gun fitter at Krieghoff who fitted me using this method a number of years ago (mid- late 80's). It was also he, that told me that a shooters stance could effect this slightly as well. I guess he didn't know what he was doing!!!

But my memory is not what what it used to be!!! But I've never had the base of my thumb hit my cheek??? but I have had my thumb hit my nose on some guns. Just saying. Sounds like your reading right from a book. Who's finger can I use to check this distance when I have my gun mounted and want to check this 2 finger distance myself??? How much did you pay for this book!!! Break em all. Jeff
 

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Years ago, Vic Reinders and I had a long talk about this very subject. He told me if a stock is to long for you it will usually appear to shoot lower than a stock that is to short. He also mentioned that you want to shoot a stock as short as you can without your thumb hitting your nose on station 1 & 5 while shooting hard lefts and rights. The closer you can get to the receiver of the gun is beneficial to one's shooting.

I was once in Gander Mountain and I witnessed one of their so called experts fit a stock to a guy by having him place the stock on his bent forearm and told him that method is fool proof for stock fit. The salesman went into the back room for a moment and I told the guy I would recommend not walking out of the store but running, as this guy knows nothing about stock fit.
Steve Balistreri
Wauwatosa Wisconsin
 

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I shoot 2 30" Brownings both having the same LOP which when mounted consistently leave me 4 fingers between my nose and thumb or 3 1/2"s. Conventional wisdom says I'm too long. Any input here about how much shortening their LOP has helped them? I get moving my head in to the receiver will change my POI but that's' easily remedied by comb adjustment.
 

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Thumb hits your nose Too short
Thumb hits your glasses Too short
Finger nail cuts your lip Too short
Otherwise Not too short
 
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