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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased a brand new Krieghoff K20 with Pro Sporter barrels. I have about 500 rounds thru the gun now. When I first got the gun it was VERY difficult to open with the factory snap caps in place. Removing the snaps resulted in alleviating the opening difficulty - that problem seemed to be solved.

However, after firing two shells the gun is still difficult to open if the hulls have been reloaded several times. If I shoot once fired shells (and the first time be reloaded) the gun opens pretty easily. Shooting hulls that are pretty well worn makes the gun hard to open.

This phenomenon happens with the old hull in the lower barrel causing me to suspect my MEC 9000 doesn't resize old hulls as well as it does new shells (?). Is this a realistic probability ? Granted, some of my many times loaded shells require a "little push" to seat them in the barrel as opposed to new shells which just "drop in." But, none of my other guns are hard to open after firing regardless of the new/old shell scenario.

The retailer suggested the gun would loosen up after a while. I've owned other new guns, including other new K guns, w/out experiencing this issue. I'm borderline considering having the dealer send the gun to Krieghoff for inspection.

Thoughts, comments, or suggestions appreciated. (Please don't suggest I just shoot all new shells. )
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The gun is easy, or easy as any new stiff gun should be, to open if I dry fire it.

I'm reloading Remington STS and Winchester AA ( old compression formed) hulls. No distinction re: difficulty in opening from either brand. It seems to be more about the case condition - actually the plastic being "pregnant" - and not the brass being insufficiently resized.

However, using these same shells in other 20 ga. guns doesnt result in the same issue.
 

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An efficient way to determine if it is a shell sizing issue, place the loaded round in a PW full length sizing die. If this solves the problem, get rid of the MEC and buy a PW with full length sizing dies.
 

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Run the sizer adjusting nut up a notch, maybe 2 (counterclockwise). Your gun may have minimum headspace. Most O/U's have generous headspace, but some are toward the minimum side. The case body being a little swelled up will not cause what you are experiencing.
 

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Is it harder to open when you shoot the top barrel?

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
Are the hulls you’re having difficulty with steel or brass? I shoot a K-80 and I reload with a MEC 9000 and haven’t ever had that issue.

I don’t think the K snap caps are necessarily the best. I was dry fire practicing with the K snap caps just yesterday and if the K snap cap stays in the same orientation the blue paint wears off of the head snap cap.
 

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Are the hulls you’re having difficulty with steel or brass? I shoot a K-80 and I reload with a MEC 9000 and haven’t ever had that issue.

I don’t think the K snap caps are necessarily the best. I was dry fire practicing with the K snap caps just yesterday and if the K snap cap stays in the same orientation the blue paint wears off of the head snap cap.
In case you overlooked this part of his comment in his reply above.

I'm reloading Remington STS and Winchester AA ( old compression formed) hulls.
 

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You didn't say if it does it with new ammo, but you mentioned using some new ammo. If it doesn't do it with new, follow Coach's advice. What primer are you using?

I'll have some reloads that don't slide in as easy as new rounds, so it's a sizing problem. As long as your firing pins don't pierce or hang on the primer it's a solvable problem. Some guns pierce Cheddite primers and get hung up.
 

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If new shells just drop in, and your reloads need to be pushed in, your reloader isn't adjusted properly, or you need to change components. You need to learn how to adjust it. You may have gotten away with sloppy reloads in your other guns, but you should be able to turn out reloads that look and work as well as factory shells, when you learn more about the process. Read the manual, watch youtubes, call MEC, have a mentor help you, until you are producing a good shell.
7/8 oz 20 gauge can be a challenging shell to reload, as many recipes for Remington shells try to fit too much stuff in the hull, and it affects stack height. I use a dense powder and the proper wad, and produce good performing shells. The cost of reloading 20 gauge is really pretty close to factory shells at the moment. I reload 3/4 oz 20 gauge most often. I love these.
 

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You need to dial down your initial resize die to get the base back down to original factory spec, or at least .002 to .003" less than your chamber dimension. I set mine to resize AAHS brass base to .472-.473" at 1/8" above the rim and have zero issues. YMMV
 
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