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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our club is very small and ran down, we're trying to bring it back from the dead, our traps are old otter's we can't even find parts for. anyway, everything I think maybe out of adjustment. I found the old stakes for the angles, what I would like to do is make a T bar out of pvc pipe to set 16 yards from the center of the trap to set the height.I'm just not sure on how tall to make the T bar, seems I have read several different opinions on this.I also have read some use a "hoop" How big should the "hoop" be? I'm pretty new at this and not real sure what I'm doing but no one else seems to want to put in any effort and we got to start somewhere so any advice will appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I fully understand the rule book, they should be between 8'-10' high at 30' (10 yards) at the front center of the trap house providing the ground is level at the front of the trap. that sound right?
 

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Our club is very small and ran down, we're trying to bring it back from the dead, our traps are old otter's we can't even find parts for. anyway, everything I think maybe out of adjustment. I found the old stakes for the angles, what I would like to do is make a T bar out of pvc pipe to set 16 yards from the center of the trap to set the height.I'm just not sure on how tall to make the T bar, seems I have read several different opinions on this.I also have read some use a "hoop" How big should the "hoop" be? I'm pretty new at this and not real sure what I'm doing but no one else seems to want to put in any effort and we got to start somewhere so any advice will appreciated.


E. FLIGHTS AND ANGLES


Singles targets shall be thrown not less than 49 yards nor more than 51 yards. Distance measurements are on level ground in still air. Targets shall be between 8 feet and 10 feet high, when 10 yards from Point B. The recommended height is 9 or 9 1/2 feet. The height at a point 10 yards

from Point B is to be understood to mean height above an imaginary horizontal straight line drawn through the post and Point B. (See Diagram

II) (See also the alternative to setting by distance - setting by speed - in Section F, following.)

Target height may also be set based on the height of the target at ten yards as measured above the level of the trap arm in the house rather than the height as measured from the number 3 shooting station. This is the recommended procedure at facilities where the installation of traps in the houses is inconsistent as to height.

Point B is defined as the intersection of a line measured 1 foot 6 inches from the outside vertical wall (farthest from the shooting stations) of the trap house and the centerline of the trap house. Please review Diagram I on page 55. If the trap machine manufacturer specifies a dimension other

than 1 foot 6 inches, that dimension may be used in construction of the trap house. Clubs constructing new trap house and fields should use the

same point B measurement as their existing fields to keep all fields as consistent as possible, provided the same trap machines are being used.

In Singles shooting the trap shall be so adjusted that within the normal distribution of angles as thrown by the trap, the right angle shall not be less than 17 degrees measured to the right of center (3BF), and not less than 17 degrees measured to the left of center (3BF), with a total angle between outside target limits of not less than 34 degrees. (See Diagram II) Under no circumstances shall a Standard Model 1524 trap be set in less than the #2 hole. Any other trap machine shall be adjusted so as to throw not less than equivalent angles. Where terrain allows, a visible stake may be placed on the centerline of the trap on the arc of a circle that has a radius of 50 yards and its center is Point B (Point F, Diagram II). To help in determining legal angles, stakes may be placed on the arc of a circle that has a radius of 50 yards and its center is Point B. One stake should be placed where a line drawn through Point A and Point B intersects this arc and another stake placed where a line drawn through Point C and Point B intersects the arc These lines and stakes will assist in determining the required angles, but it is to be understood that the angle specifications apply when the target is from 15 yards to 20 yards from the trap rather than where the target strikes the ground. However, no target is to be declared illegal unless it is significantly outside normal parameters (e.g., more than 10 degrees outside normal).

In doubles shooting, targets shall be thrown not less than 44 yards nor more than 46 yards. Distance measurements are on level ground in still air. Targets shall be between 8 feet and 10 feet high when 10 yards from point B. The recommended height is 9 or 9 1/2 feet. The height at a point 10 yards from Point B is to be understood to mean height above an imaginary 47

horizontal straight line drawn through the post and Point B (See Diagram II). The trap shall be adjusted so the angle of target spread is not less than 34 degrees. (See the alternative to setting by distance - setting by speed - in Section F, following.)

Target height may also be set based on the height of the target at ten yards as measured above the level of the trap arm in the house rather than the height as measured from the number 3 shooting station.

The 17 degree angle will appear to be a straight-away from a point 3 1/2 feet to the right of post 1; the 17 degree angle will appear to be a straight- away from a point 3 1/2 feet to the left of post 5. This 17 degree angle

refers to the flight line of the target from the house to 15 or 20 yards out

and can be used for singles, handicap, and doubles targets.







 
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You'll find that most folks are comfortable with 9 1/2 to 10 ft. My t-bars have always been 9 1/2'.

But some like them at 11 feet and 20 MPH. HeH.

9.5 ft targets present enough 'face' for good visibility and if the speed is right folks think they are shooting Garbage Can Lids. Go as best you can by the book specs above and know that you must get within book specs before you can throw ATA targets but if you get close with your machines ( a bit fast, a bit wide, and a bit low or high ) they will make excellent training traps for all-conditions ATA targets.

Don T
 
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Beasty 1.... Congratulations on deciding to become involved. Someone has to take the lead, right? You are correct in what you read. Your T bar, hoop, or whatever you use to measure the height, should rest on a monument set in the ground 10 yards directly in front of the trap house measured from the pivot of the trap throwing arm: Read this again as it is critical to a properly set target:

Target height may also be set based on the height of the target at ten yards as measured above the level of the trap arm in the house rather than the height as measured from the number 3 shooting station. This is the recommended procedure at facilities where the installation of traps in the houses is inconsistent as to height.

Target height may also be set based on the height of the target at ten yards as measured above the level of the trap arm in the house rather than the height as measured from the number 3 shooting station.

Follow these rule as best you can and you will have set some pretty decent targets for your shooters. As Barry above said, most shooters prefer a 9 1/2 to 10 foot target. I, personally, prefer a 9 1/2' target over a 10' target just for the reason Don T said above: Enough "face" on the target to make it clearly visible... Good luck...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Right or wrong I have the height bar made, one thing about 1 1/2" PVC it's easy to shorten or lengthen, If the wind ever die down I'll go get the keys for the traps and see what damage I can do.:032: I know a couple of guys that shoot are concrete workers so maybe they have access to a transom to fine tune everything . I have tried to find parts for the old otter's traps,(tried Champion too) but they are so old there isn't much to be found on the web, luckily I know a machinist that can make a couple of the worn parts on them. Thanks to all that have responded to this thread.
 

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beasty 1, set the target speed first, then use the T-bar. 9.5' is the best setting IMO, because you could have some tail and some head winds during the shoot. I don't wish to complicate your life, but the 9.5' is not height above ground 10' out, it means above Point B. In your situation, I would not get too fancy. Set the target speed correctly, then approximate the height. Have a bunch of shooters opine on whether they look too high or too low. When you get it set so a majority agrees, call it done. Cut your pipe to match and you are good to go.

BTW, if you set the speed correctly, you can get a pretty good idea of whether the height is right by looking at how close they come to the 50 yard stake. If they are right at the base or a tad short, you have the right height.
 

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Hi everyone:
I was and still am confused with going off the Pat-Trap arm. SO at the pivot point of the arm? Or where it rests in the cocked position? Confused about where the 1'6" lands. I just went 26 yards from station 3 and shot the elevation, because my field climbs a hill just past the trap house. Adjusted the T-bar to match. Then radar the bird to be set at 42mph. Dave T.
 
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