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Discussion Starter #1
++++++It

I thought this was pretty interesting.

In a motor accident, wherein a speeding car hits a slower moving vehicle coming from the side, the speeding car drivers often swear that they just didn’t see the vehicle coming from the left or right. Well, they aren’t lying. They really don’t see the vehicle coming from the side, in spite of broad daylight. This phenomenon on the car drivers’ part is known as “Motion Induced Blindness”. It is definitely frightening.

Once airborne, pilots are taught to alternate their gaze between scanning the horizon and scanning their instrument panel, and never to fix their gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. They are taught to continually keep their heads on a swivel and their eyes always moving. Because, if you fix your gaze on one object long enough while you yourself are in motion, your peripheral vision goes blind.

Till about three decades ago, this “heads on swivel & eyes moving” technique was the only way to spot other aircraft in the skies around. Now-a-days they have on-board radars, but the old technique still holds good.

Let me give you a small demonstration of motion induced blindness. Just click on the link below. You will see a revolving array of blue crosses on a black background. There is a flashing green dot in the centre and three fixed yellow dots around it. If you fix your gaze on the green dot for more than a few seconds, the yellow dots will disappear at random, either singly, or in pairs, or all three together. In reality, the yellow dots are always there.

Just watch the yellow dots for some time to ensure that they don’t go anywhere!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
....I am not sure how this might pertain to Trap shooting but I would be interested in your thoughts....Smokit
 

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I have always felt that the concept of "Soft Focus" is a contradiction of the idea of staring at the target with maximum intensity. If I focus too hard at a spot in front of the trap house the target can get the jump on me before I even know what is going on. I practice my "Quiet Eye" period before I mount the gun to my shoulder instead of holding the gun there too long before calling for the target.
 
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