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Discussion Starter #1
By a quirky turn-of-events, I am about to get a family gun that has been 'lost' for a couple of generations.

It has been in a closet, loaded and cocked for at least 30+ years. If the mainsprings are not completely set and worthless, I'm sure they will break quickly.

If not a Springmaker ... If somebody has a small machine-shop who can precison-slit and rough-shape spring-stock, I can fine-file, polish, finish & fit, harden & temper.

Bob



 

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Why not remove, and re-arch the existing ones? You'll never make new ones the same.

Randy
 

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Randy, thanks.

I'll probably do just that, but historically, that's an iffy proposition, and I suspect the springs in the gun (the pic is of fairly new origin and is a different gun) are not going to be full-performance, anyhow.

I've got spring stock, Cold Rolled 1095 in a few thickness' & widths. Other than the slitting, that's a pretty simple spring to make: couple of hours of filing for the pair. Polishing will take more time, especially the slit, and I haven't quite ciphered-out how to do that just yet.

Bob
 

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Bob: there are several problems with 1095. First it is not designed to be used as spring material. It will fatigue and crack. The second is heat treating it so it doesn't fatigue and crack. It's primary usage is in files which as you know are pretty brittle. This is one of the traits of 1095, it gets nice and hard but tempering it does not decrease it's brittleness very much.

A better material would be 5150. Which is the same material as used in leaf springs in a car. Still the heat treating problem is still there, and must be done after the material is formed to whatever shape you wanted. You can't do anything to it except grind it after it is hard.

O1 Toolsteel could be shaped and heat treated with a torch to 1450F, quenched in oil, and then pulled back in your wifes oven 450F for 2 hours. It is available in "Precision Ground flat stock" from Starrett in a variety of thicknesses, and machines pretty easily. I think this would be the easiest, most readily available, and overall best choice to make replacement parts like leaf type springs out of. It's available thru most tool catalogs or any industrial supply company.

Others may have differing opinions.

Good luck,

Randy
 

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Bob,

I've a good friend in the UK who is a gun smith/gun maker.

I am sure he could reproduce the springs for you (I often carry spring stock to the UK for him).

Feel free to be in touch... drop the X's

David D
 

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i can make the new springs for you. if the locks are from a westley richards, i have made them in the past. they will be made from digitized information from the old spring and altered to the original shape and be close enough to require no fitting.

bruce bowen [email protected]
 
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