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I like the idea of self sufficiency, I always feel better about things that I build or make than the uncertainty that comes with buying new untried things. I have enough supplies to survive at least a five year period of shortages or stupid politicians.
 

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If you find a handload that works well for you it will be equal to higher end ammo and you can load the same load all the time. If you shop for cheaper ammo you may not find the same brand everytime. Different brands will probably not shoot the same. Even The same brand may pattern differently from Lot to lot.

People compare Gun Club, Top Gun and other cheaper shell prices to reloading costs and state they are only saving .50 to .75 a box. . I compare my reloads to STS,, AA's and Federal Premium shells and save almost 3.00/box.

I don't know what i would have done during the shutdown during the pandemic if I didn't load a little over 28 flats of 12 ga,
You're so right, I did not think of the Gun Club to the Nitro's prices. So now I even feel better about reloading and saving money. As I was comparing the less expensive ammo. But I have found that the Gun Club has shot many of high 90's for me in the ATA. Same with the Nitro. On another note. The STS & Nitro's reload with better crimping, even though the Gun Club looks almost as good without changing anything on the reloader. I've reloaded Gun Clubs as well as the Nitro's over 7+ times
But I shoot FACTORY AT THE MATCHES.
 

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Given the political/economic environment we live in, I am happy that I have reloading gear not only for shotgun, but for metallic cartridges as well. For me, it is much easier to buy reloading components than loaded ammo. Yes, it is work and time consuming but, make your choice. While cost is an important factor, my survival against blm/antifa/democrat/communist thugs outweighs the cost factor for now. I have reloaded a boatload of 40 S&W for my p229, for which I am proficient with and glad I have it and it does perform very well and 5.56mm and 30-06. I keep the P229 next to me at night on the night stand, reload 5.56 for my AR15 platform and 30-.06 for my M1. Meanwhile, I keep reloading for trap, while is is not very cost effective, the benefit is you can reload what you want and keep shooting than run around town trying to find ammo/ or paying high shipping fees for ammo you want/need and it may not be what you want. Where you live can dictate what is available. Bottom line, make your choice.
Agree, Trump 2020!
 

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Always has been worth the hassle for me. But... you have to want to do it. It does not pay.
But when I retired, the pay is the same. Reload or buy new.. I have a problem when I see the fired hulls sitting in a bucket calling my name. Shoot today... Reload tomorrow. Better than sitting inside the house watching worthless TV Shows with no values that or on today. (or any day) But love the old Westerns, and family shows. When not on.I'm in the garage!
 

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Only if you like it I buy shells on sale and bulk 25 to 50 cents not worth it to me unless u want to load 5/8 ounce cuts cost a little. that said i have the making for several thousand rounds on hand.
 

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When I started shooting trap just after my post-college graduation job I started loading shot shells on the kitchen table in our small duplex apartment using a MEC single stage loader. Over the years I progressed to a MEC Grabber (two of them) in a dedicated work area in the detached garage at our new house. It was a hobby which was an extension of the shooting and I enjoyed the quiet time doing the repetitive work and watching a newly reloaded shell emerge from the last station of the loader. An "oldies" station on the radio or a CD in the player added to the ambience of that hobby.

When my son got old enough to take interest and help the reloading process became doubly enjoyable. After he was big enough to shoot his interest spiked and he enjoyed the loading process much. We were a real team at the loading bench and it great times together. In time my son grew up, graduated from college and moved away. I gave up reloading a few years later as after 30 years I simply no longer enjoyed it. The spark was extinguished and I have no interest in starting again. But, that's just me.

Now I buy my shells or shoot the reloads my older brother gives me as he is still reloading shot shells and all the metallic calibers I used to reload for. I no longer have the interest in reloading much of anything except a couple of rifle calibers.

For the OP I can only say it is definitely and without doubt worth "the hassel" if you enjoy it. But, only if you enjoy it. And no one can make that judgement for you. Good luck with whatever you decide and may you continue to shoot in good health.
 

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I loaded 150 rounds yesterday morning before it got to hot. I only took about 20 to 25 minutes. I didn't lose any money from not working because I an retired, I didn't drive to 4 or 5 stores to look for premium ammo. I figure I saved about 3.00/box x 6 boxes = 18.00 for what I loaded comes to about 42.00 to 54.00/ hour I saved over buying Prem. ammo. I actually didn't save it I just didn't spend 45.00 for the 6 boxes.
 

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As said by others " It isn't a hassle, it's a hobby". Something to do when there is a foot of snow on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
As said by others " It isn't a hassle, it's a hobby". Something to do when there is a foot of snow on the ground.
I agree and given the fact that just buying a flat of shells worthy of reloading in todays market is also a PITA. I'm headed out tomorrow to buy 4-6 flats and I already know that is going to be chore and will have to hit several stores in hopes of finding that.

To be honest I don't care what the up front cost is in a reloader I just want to have access to shells when I need them.
 

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10 years ago when I was shooting I reloaded using a MEC 9000H. Around 2010 I relocated to North Alabama and haven't shot since than. At the time I stopped reloading lead was getting so expensive it wasn't cost effective. I than sold ALL my loading equipment and supplies during a recent move (should not have done that).

Fast forward to now and I'm getting back into shooting and finding myself think well it sure would be nice if I had all that equipment I sold right now. I ran the numbers and it's still not cost effective to reload so that leaves just doing it as an extension of the sport and/or playing with special loads.

My thoughts were to keep it on the down low if I decided to pick up reloading again and buy a MEC 650N but after using a 9000H for a few years I'm think I'm spoiled on that machine or the Auto-Mate. I tend to be a all in or nothing kind of guy with my hobbies.

If you had it to do over would you reload? Do you have equipment now and don't reload?

Dennis
It's like any other hobby. If you enjoy it, do it. If money or cost is an issue, don't do it. Like others I find it relaxing and can forget about other problems for awhile. Plus, taking pride in what you're doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Given my dismal trip out today to buy shells local looks likes getting back into reloading is going to come sooner than later. My luck on the internet this past week wasn't much better.

As I stated earlier my last machine was a MEC 9000H and while I did like this loader it could be finicky but when adjusted correctly it would crank out shells. I have also been looking at the Spolar Gold w/ hydraulics that appears to be a top shelf machine.

**The cost you soon forget but the quality stays with you forever**

Both machines would do well for me and I doubt I would wear either machine out in what time I have left. That being said I was reading another thread on MEC vs. Spolar and someone made mention that the MEC had the collet sizer for steel hulls and that they didn't load those on the Spolar. Can you load steel hulls (Remington Gun Club) on a Spolar?

I understand both machines are at each end of the spectrum from a cost point but I tend to over analyze this stuff to the ends of the earth before pulling the trigger.

Dennis
 

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Given my dismal trip out today to buy shells local looks likes getting back into reloading is going to come sooner than later. My luck on the internet this past week wasn't much better.

As I stated earlier my last machine was a MEC 9000H and while I did like this loader it could be finicky but when adjusted correctly it would crank out shells. I have also been looking at the Spolar Gold w/ hydraulics that appears to be a top shelf machine.

**The cost you soon forget but the quality stays with you forever**

Both machines would do well for me and I doubt I would wear either machine out in what time I have left. That being said I was reading another thread on MEC vs. Spolar and someone made mention that the MEC had the collet sizer for steel hulls and that they didn't load those on the Spolar. Can you load steel hulls (Remington Gun Club) on a Spolar?

I understand both machines are at each end of the spectrum from a cost point but I tend to over analyze this stuff to the ends of the earth before pulling the trigger.

Dennis
FWIW. Don’t overlook the RCBS Grand in your decision making.

RK


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #78
While the Spolar Gold would be a nice machine to own I'm leaning towards another MEC 9000 as it's 1/3 the cost of the Spolar. I considering the Automate if I can figure out the foot pedal Mod I see people using on YouTube.
 

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I have loaded about 6 thousand this year. I enjoy doing it. I am now shooting 7/8 ounce loads, lower velocity and crushing 16 yard birds. 1 ounce 7-1/2 for handicap league. Do I save much, probably not but my shoulder likes them.
 

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Here is why reloading is worth the hassle: It gives the illusion that the sport of shooting is less expensive than it really is. When I load up 6-8 flats and and take a couple to the range, I only have to pay for the targets I shoot. I don't have to think about the cost of the ammunition I will be shooting. In my mind, it separates the cost of the ammo from the cost of the targets. I don't think about the investment in all the equipment/components I have in the basement. It also helps hide the cost from the CFO.
 
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